or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Food & Equipment Reviews › Cooking Knife Reviews › New pastry cook, left-handed, and replacing school knife
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

New pastry cook, left-handed, and replacing school knife

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 

I just graduated from culinary school and got a job as a pastry cook in a fine dining restaurant. I want to replace the 8" chefs knife from my school kit, and I'm looking for recommendations.

 

Some of the line cooks recommended Shun, but I'm left-handed and it seems impossible to find the reverse grip knives.

 

I don't have any bias or prejudice when it comes to materials, aesthetic, or country of origin. I want a knife that I can easily keep sharp for cutting soft fruits and mousse cakes and the like. I'm not super confident in my knife handling or sharpening skills yet, so something that won't get chipped or damaged easily is preferred. I'm female and have small/medium hands.

 

I'm also looking at a 4" utility-type knife. My coworker has a Mac knife that he let me borrow, and it seemed acceptable.

 

I won't say price is no object. I'm really more comfortable in the under-$200 range, but I'm willing to spend more for the knife that sharpens itself and never cuts human flesh. ;)

 

Thanks for your assistance!

post #2 of 4

You could consider the Gonbei AUS-10 line from Japanese Knife Imports

https://www.japaneseknifeimports.com/collections/aus-10-series/products/gonbei-aus-10-210mm-gyuto

And a basic paring/petty knife from the Gesshin stainless line.

I'm thinking you'll want to trend to thinner knives for your cutting purposes. Stainless preferred?

Also the righty D-handles aren't always a death sentence to lefties, it depends on the individual and the knife. I've got a wooden handled right D on one of my knives which isn't a problem but the rest of them are symmetrical. But there are plenty of good western handled and oval/octagonal wooden handled knives anyways :)

 

How are you maintaining your knives?

post #3 of 4
If you like the Shun take a look at the Premiere line. Handles are symmetrical and fit left handed quite nicely.
post #4 of 4
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by foody518 View Post
 

I'm thinking you'll want to trend to thinner knives for your cutting purposes. Stainless preferred?

 

 

I'm open to anything, as long as it strikes the right balance of durability, ease of maintaining sharpness, and resistance to acidic foods.

 

Quote:

 How are you maintaining your knives?

 

I had the knives from my school kit professionally sharpened when the mobile guy came to the school a couple of weeks after I started. Since then, I've just been using a honing steel whenever I use them. Part of my interest in getting new knives comes from having somehow knocked a pretty good nick into the blade of my chefs knife during finals and part is that the chefs knife has the school's logo on and I'm thinking I'd like to keep it for sentimental reasons. It's a Mercer and it's served me well for what I need, but, yeah, upgrade time now that I have a Real Job™.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cooking Knife Reviews
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Food & Equipment Reviews › Cooking Knife Reviews › New pastry cook, left-handed, and replacing school knife