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Teach a (young) man to fish (or in this case, sharpen) - Page 2

Poll Results: How are your knives sharpened?

 
  • 100% (7)
    Stones
  • 0% (0)
    Belt sander
  • 0% (0)
    Machine
  • 0% (0)
    other
7 Total Votes  
post #31 of 41

I have been working as a chef for over forty years. We have a professional sharpening service that comes into our work place (at the request of the owner) and who does all the house knives and everyone's personal knives... except mine. I have seen his work and I wouldn't let him anywhere near my knives...but that is just my take on his work.

 

I have lots of similar services over the years and the view expressed above seems to be my take on the vast majority of those services.

 

When I was in culinary school and took the class in Chinese cuisine, we took a walking tour through San Francisco Chinatown with the instructor who was a well known chef and author. He pointed to a restaurant that was full of Asians and said that must be a sign that the cuisine is good there. Then he laughed and said not necessarily so. Just because it is crowded and people are paying money to eat there it doesn't mean it is good. Asians people are no better judge of quality than other people. Make your own judgements. He then pointed another restaurant that was sparsely populated and said it had much better cuisine, but ...make your own judgement. That has stuck with me through the years.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #32 of 41

There's different levels of professionals.  I have a friend who had such a business and he has destroyed a lot of knives on a belt sander.  He had no idea what he's doing and he stinks at cooking!  He was a 'professional' sharpener.  Then there's Jon at JKI who charges $20 to hand sharpen a knife on stones.  Belt grinder = 30 seconds.  Sharpen by hand = 15-30 minutes at least.  You get what you pay for type of thing.

 

You need a real soft touch on a belt sander.  A trusted knife maker I know said he quenches in water EVERY 3 passes to avoid the overheating problem.  Others might use a wet grinder instead. 

 

Cooking is your business and your craft.  Knife is probably the most important tool, and your livelihood depends on it, no joke.  I don't care if you are a woodworker, mechanic or what, others can't be trusted to take care of your tools.  

post #33 of 41
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MillionsKnives View Post
I don't care if you are a woodworker, mechanic or what, others can't be trusted to take care of your tools.  

I would also add:

 

OR services like mechanical work on your car, renovating a room in your house etc.  I have trust issues, because the bad ones ruin it for the good ones, and if i can learn to do it myself, than i will.  Its not about being cheap, I will pay good money for quality work, but i can only trust myself.

post #34 of 41
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MillionsKnives View Post
 

There's different levels of professionals.  I have a friend who had such a business and he has destroyed a lot of knives on a belt sander.  He had no idea what he's doing and he stinks at cooking!  He was a 'professional' sharpener.  Then there's Jon at JKI who charges $20 to hand sharpen a knife on stones.  Belt grinder = 30 seconds.  Sharpen by hand = 15-30 minutes at least.  You get what you pay for type of thing.

 

You need a real soft touch on a belt sander.  A trusted knife maker I know said he quenches in water EVERY 3 passes to avoid the overheating problem.  Others might use a wet grinder instead. 

 

Cooking is your business and your craft.  Knife is probably the most important tool, and your livelihood depends on it, no joke.  I don't care if you are a woodworker, mechanic or what, others can't be trusted to take care of your tools.  


Who is "Jon @ JKI " and how is he known by other users

post #35 of 41

he owns this site:  https://www.japaneseknifeimports.com

 

Other than selling and sharpening knives, he has a great sharpening instructional playlist https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GB3jkRi1dKs&list=PLEBF55079F53216AB

 

It's geared to japanese knives obviously but the concept applies to all knives.  You will just find soft stainless harder to raise a burr on.

post #36 of 41

I'm Jon :)

 

I'm always watching stuff here, and though i dont always have time to post, i can always answer questions if you have any

post #37 of 41
I don't know how meticulous Mr. Belt Sander is about his work. Looking at your bottom picture in your opening post, many of the knives' profiles look wavy or otherwise changed from how you would have bought the knife.
Another part is I guess if you, the clientele, as well as others he is servicing, don't point out some of these things or have specific demands/standards, he'll just assume all is well.
Probably takes him a minute or two to redo a job, not a big setback.
post #38 of 41
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JBroida View Post
 

I'm Jon :)

 

I'm always watching stuff here, and though i dont always have time to post, i can always answer questions if you have any


lol, hi :)

post #39 of 41

Major confession here:

 

In the past 5 years or so I've become a woodworking "hand tool junkie", and  alot of edge tools like chisels, planes, etc. have followed me home from garage sales, fleas, and the like.  The ones I want, I keep, the others I fix up and sell.  A brand name $2.00 flea market  chisel that was abused to open paint cans can be sold for $25.00 if a new bevel is ground, a secondary bevel established, and the back polished. Same with planes, side axes, draw knives, etc.  The money goes into the ol' mayonnaise jar, and when I have enough I go out and buy a new toy.

 

Next week it will be a Tormek t-4.  This is a Swedish made, water cooled grindstone, running at around 90 rpm.  I've got a bunch of people bugging me to sharpen their knives, but my plan is a little different.  I plan on bringing the machine to their kitchen, and letting each cook sharpen their own knives for a buck a piece, or an unopened beer.  The machine is dead simple to operate, and the risk of burning an edge is almost impossible.

 

The machine sells for $460 CDN, which is a chunk of change.  It is also high quality and very practical to use.

 

In the sharpening world, you've got a zillion options......   

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #40 of 41

Some belt sander stuff:

 

http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/showthread.php/27108-How-do-you-grind-kitchen-knife-blades-(stock-removal)?highlight=belt+sander

 

http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/showthread.php/27108-How-do-you-grind-kitchen-knife-blades-(stock-removal)?highlight=belt+sander

 

http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/showthread.php/27047-Best-1x30-quot-sanding-belts-for-stock-removal-(please-read)?

 

highlight=belt+sanderhttp://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/showthread.php/27047-Best-1x30-quot-sanding-belts-for-stock-removal-(please-read)?

 

highlight=belt+sanderhttp://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/showthread.php/25494-Belt-Sander?highlight=belt+sander

post #41 of 41
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