or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Bresse Chickens

post #1 of 59
Thread Starter 
Does anyone know if it is at all possible to get Bress chickens (the chicken with the blue feet) found in Bourg en Bresse, France? If that is not possible does anyone know of any farmers who are raising chickens in a similar fashion?

------------------
Thanks,

Nicko
nicko@cheftalk.com
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
post #2 of 59
Nicko,


Here is some information about poulet de Bresse.

The poulet de Bresse is the best chicken one can find. To be given the mark (appelation) poulet de Bresse, the chicken has to belong to the Bressane race. The main characteristics of this race are as follow: red cockscomb for the male, white feathers and blue feet.

The raising of the chicken is strictly regulated. At 35 days the chicken is released in a pasture where he is allowed a minimum space of 10 square metres. The chicken will remain in this pasture for nine weeks. He is then put into a cage for eight to 15 days. This will help the development of its characteristic white flesh. The chicken is slaughter at 16 weeks.

The feeding of the chicken is what gives it its main characteristic. cereal flour, corn, dairy products with, among other things, worms, mollusc and the insects the chicken finds on the ground.


All Bresse chicken have a tricolour tag on their leg.


Hope this will be helpful


Sisi
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
Reply
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
Reply
post #3 of 59
I went to an Organic Farmers Conf. last Feb and they were discusing pastured poultry. Breese came up in the conversation. what I would tell you Nicko is talk to your Dept of Ag in Ill. I have contacts in Springfield (I spoke at the speciality farmers conf 2000)if you need them and find poultry farmers willing to experiment for you...do a special grow.....get specifics and see what the farmers can do for you.
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
post #4 of 59
Thread Starter 
Thanks Sisi and Shroomgirl. I worked in Bourg en Bresse France, for awhile and so I was wondering if a chicken of similar quality was available. Shroom I did talk with a good friend of mine who had also worked in Bourg en Bresse and he was working with a local Illinois farmer to see if they could raise some chickens with similar characteristics. It wasn't easy as I remember, and I don't think it ever came to fruition.

------------------
Thanks,

Nicko
nicko@cheftalk.com
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
post #5 of 59
HMMMMM if this was not in the last year or so...you may want to try again, I could swear that there's been talk of bresse in USA
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
post #6 of 59
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
Reply
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
Reply
post #7 of 59
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
Reply
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
Reply
post #8 of 59

I pasture raise a breed of poultry from France called Freedom Rangers. In France this is the breed that is sold for their Label Rouge. These birds I raise are beyond Organic.

I am located in Peotone IL.

post #9 of 59

Look at this article:

http://nymag.com/nymetro/food/features/14787/

 

I know D’Artagnan is commonly available in NYC specialty shops, and they do mail order as well.

post #10 of 59

Guys, this thread is almost 11 years old...........

Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
post #11 of 59

......and a whole lot has changed in the culinary world along the way.

 

One of the positive changes is the greater availability of heritage livestock breeds. People are raising all sorts of old-time breeds, in poultry, hogs, and even cows.

 

I'd say interest in heritage livestock right now is about where heirloom vegetables were in the early to mid-90s; that is, it's sort of an agricultural subculture with ever growing numbers of participants. If it follows the same progression, we're sure to see many of those varieties mainstreamed in the near future. Meanwhile, if you search around, you can find them.

 

Shromgirl, I know, has been very active on the hog end, and can probably make references. Poultry probably is even bigger, in terms of breeders, because there were so many more varieties, and they require less room.

 

All in all, it's a great time for real food.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #12 of 59

   Hi grassfarmer42...welcome smile.gif

 

 

  Have you got a website that you can either post here or pm me?

 

 

  thanks,

  dan

post #13 of 59

We have a small farm in North Florida.  In 2011 we successfully imported Bresse into the United States.  You can see them at:

 

www.greenfirefarms.com

 

 

post #14 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by greenfire View Post

We have a small farm in North Florida.  In 2011 we successfully imported Bresse into the United States.  You can see them at:

 

www.greenfirefarms.com

 

 


Very nice!  I love your selection!

 

post #15 of 59

Thanks very much.  It's funny that this thread was started a decade ago and now we actually have some chickens to talk about!

 

We're hatching our first white American Bresse this week; the first ever hatched in America to the best of my knowledge.  We will be building them a rolling coop to put out on pasture in a couple of months.

 

The American Bresse are beautiful birds with muscular bodies and balanced proportions.  What I hadn't read but have now experienced is that they also have excellent personalities.  They're confident and inquisitive, and even the hens  --commonly flighty in other breeds-- are calm and enjoy people. 

 

 

 

 

 

post #16 of 59

D'Artagnan Farms-- It's a domestically bred blue footed chicken that's the closest you can get to in the U.S.  Apparently the French are very proprietary and have not let any Bresse chicken eggs get smuggled out of the country!  Warning:  they are very expensive and come with the feet on which you have to figure out how to lop off.

post #17 of 59

Until recently it is true that the only birds available in the US were the blue-footed chicken; a Bresse facsimile bred to look like a Bresse but genetically not an authentic Bresse.  This changed in 2011.  There are now authentic Bresse in the United States.

 

While it is true the French government banned the export of live Bresse, other European countries did not.  And, over time, small flocks of authentic Bresse were established in a few of those other European countries.  Greenfire Farms legally imported chickens from these other European countries.  In 2011, our imported Bresse were approved with a USDA import permit and quarantined for 30 days in the USDA quarantine facility in New York.  We call the birds we raise American Bresse to distinguish them from birds hatched in France.  But, the parent stock of our birds traces its lineage directly to the Bresse of France.

 

 

     

post #18 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by greenfire View Post

While it is true the French government banned the export of live Bresse, other European countries did not.  And, over time, small flocks of authentic Bresse were established in a few of those other European countries.  Greenfire Farms legally imported chickens from these other European countries.

 

So if the French government banned the export of live Bresse, those other European countries got their Bresse chickens... illegally? Then Greenfire Farms legally imported illegal chickens? eek.gif

post #19 of 59

For years Bresse have been in a number of European countries other than France.  For example, here's an article that addresses Bresse being raised in the Netherlands:

 

http://www.aviculture-europe.nl/nummers/07E02A04.pdf

 

It is not illegal to import into the United States chickens from these other countries, nor are the Bresse that are currently alive in those countries "illegal" chickens.  Our importation of Bresse was perfectly legal, and hopefully over time it will grow to benefit Americans who treasure the taste of world-class food . 

post #20 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by greenfire View Post

(...) nor are the Bresse that are currently alive in those countries "illegal" chickens.  


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by greenfire View Post

 the French government banned the export of live Bresse


If the French government banned the export of live Bresse, how could live Bress end up legally in other countries? confused.gif

 

 

 

 

 

post #21 of 59

I recently acquired Bresse eggs from a farm that had been commercially producing them here in California, one of the few places that have real Bresse. The company that was marketing them went belly up and they destroyed all the birds. The man that was responsible for raising them salvaged 360 eggs. I have eggs due to hatch in 3 days, there are 140 eggs that made it into the hatching tray.  I am interested in marketing the meat. Not sure how to go about that. Anyone interested, please contact me at sweeth2o1@gmail.com

 

post #22 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by lhamid View Post

a farm that had been commercially producing them here in California, one of the few places that have real Bresse. 


The only real Bresse chicken (or eggs for that matter) are in Bresse. Just like you cannot have any real Champagne from California or China or Russia, or from any French region other than the region of Champagne for that matter. If I buy a chicken egg in Bresse and drive 20 miles in one direction so that I am now outside the region of Bresse and raise a chicken, I cannot legally call it a Bresse chicken. 

post #23 of 59

Oh, gosh.  I guess I'll need to rename my Rhode Island reds since I don't live in Rhode Island.

 

 

post #24 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by greenfire View Post

Oh, gosh.  I guess I'll need to rename my Rhode Island reds since I don't live in Rhode Island.

 

 



All names don't mean the same thing, and all names aren't controlled. I've never claimed that French Fries came from France or Italian dressing came from Italy. But Bresse chicken's are a controlled application and their name means something very specific: that the chicken were born AND RAISED under strictly specified rules and guidelines in the Bresse country. Just like you can't buy Champagne grapes and grow them in China and call it "Champagne wine", you can't get a Bresse egg, raise the chicken in the U.S. and call it a "Bresse chicken".

 

I was born and raised just a few miles from Bresse, and yet we had no right to name our chicken "Bresse" chicken, just because we weren't IN Bresse. I find it amusing that someone would today raise chicken in the U.S. and claim that they are "TRUE Bresse chicken". wink.gif

post #25 of 59

Pollo Real in the Santa Fe area raises interesting pastured chickens.

cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
post #26 of 59
French Fries, thanks for correcting me. I understand exactly what you are saying re: the term Bresse being controlled like the term Champagne. Would it be improper to refer to them as descended from Bresse stock?
post #27 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by lhamid View Post

Would it be improper to refer to them as descended from Bresse stock?


I suppose that would be ok. 

 

The breed and the selection are only a part of what makes "Poulet de Bresse". The way they are raised, the strict feeding times (the chicken have to be able to peck around early in the morning and late at night, which means more work for the farmers), the space alloted for them to roam, the local Bresse soil and grain, the absence of antibiotic treatments and many other factors all contribute to the famous taste of those chickens. 

 

 

post #28 of 59

In passing: I have tried the D'Artagnan blue-footed chickens, and was not persuaded that the quality is worth the enormous price. I find it particularly irritating that you can only get them dressed one way: plucked and drawn, feet on, some (not entirely consistent giblets), neck and head lopped off. I figure if I'm going to pay for chicken this expensive, I want all the bits: cockscombs, tongues, neck skin, everything. I was told, apologetically, that this cannot be done.

 

On the other hand, D'Artagnan's standard organic, free-range chickens are very good indeed, much better than what I can find in places like Whole Foods and so forth.

 

I intend no comment or criticism on what Greenfire is talking about, which is completely different and I haven't tried. (But I will probably be in touch....)

post #29 of 59

Thanks French Fry. Do you have details on how to feed them to approximate the way they do it in France?  I have just a few birds (got a poor hatch, eggs were quite old). We will just be using them for our consumption eventually so I can take the time and effort to do it right. I don't feed my birds any antibiotics or junk.They get a good quality feed and have access to pasture, insects, and organically grown fruit and veggies from my garden. I currently raise Marans and Buff Orps. I raised Freedom Rangers for meat last year. They were quite good but as they are a hybrid, they don't breed true. We like the idea of a sustainable breed like the Blue Footed Whatever I Will Call them (not Bresse!). Any suggestions on the feeding regime would be greatly appreciated

post #30 of 59

I do not have all the details, however you can find them online. Here is all the legal information:

 

http://www.legifrance.gouv.fr/affichTexte.do?cidTexte=JORFTEXT000021496520&dateTexte=vig

 

... with all the information you are looking for at the following link:

 

http://www.legifrance.gouv.fr/affichTexte.do;jsessionid=CD2A226B8DC86CBF520CE6F7859195A0.tpdjo08v_3?cidTexte=JORFTEXT000021496520&dateTexte=20120205#LEGIARTI000021502358

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking