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Baking Powder substitute

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

I would like to make some biscuit dough but cant use any baking soda or powder, and was wondering what to use instead so it will rise and be flaky

 

Thanks DND

post #2 of 15

Hi there all I know is that a lot of biscuits are made with yeast powder but I use self raising flour and take out ounce of it and replace it with cornflour to make the biscuit crispy.  Hope this helps.​

post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 

Hi Apron

 

I cant use any stuff that make the gas bubbles, I heard once that an egg might help but thought I had better ask on this forum first

 

DND

post #4 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by DND75 View Post
 

Hi Apron

 

I cant use any stuff that make the gas bubbles, I heard once that an egg might help but thought I had better ask on this forum first

 

DND

 

May I ask why you can't have any stuff that makes gas bubbles? 

post #5 of 15

Hi there you mean you cannot use yeast as it makes gas bubbles.  The  cornflour will not cause gas bubbles it is to make the biscuit crispy. Eggs add volume you are right there.

post #6 of 15
Egg is often substituted by some baking soda for those who have an allergy to egg, the baking soda replicates the basic qualities of egg white. By basic, meaning its pH. Substituting baking soda with egg doesn't work because the volume and the moisture don't account for the reason you're adding baking soda.

Egg does add its own structuring and lifting capabilities varying with the recipe. So it's really more important why you're trying to avoid leavening agents. If it's about sodium, there are sodium free baking powder such as Hain Featherweight. This is a single acting baking powder that substitutes quite well for regular baking powder.
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post #7 of 15
Thread Starter 

I spent half of my life around chemicals in the racing game and it comes back to get ya, so I cant have any stuff that makes CO2 in my foods or nitrates etc

 

Been cooking for 50 plus yrs but new to the Baking stuff and just doing my home work for giving it a try

 

Like biscuits and butter and honey, and for dinner with some pork gravy

 

Thanks DND

post #8 of 15

I think you're out of luck for the traditional foods: cakes, cookies, quick breads.

 

Well, there are a few quickbreads that use egg and quick high heat to flash cook the egg and trap the steam. Popovers, Dutch Babies and such. I think that's your main option is this class of thing. 

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post #9 of 15

Give popovers a try with a standard muffin pan. And if you like it, get some of these cast iron pans to get serious about it. 

 

https://www.amazon.com/Lodge-L5P3-Seasoned-Cookware-Cornbread/dp/B00063RX60/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1469124850&sr=8-1&keywords=cast+iron+popover  

 

Get two. A standard batch of popover batter is based on 2 eggs. make a batch and a half and you'll fill two of these pans just right. Preheat them in the oven at least 20 minutes so they're good and hot. Cook's Illustrated disagrees with me and likes to use glass ones from room temperature in a cold oven. Just for full disclosure. 

 

Cheese popovers are also very good. 

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post #10 of 15

Hi there Phatch,

 

 

      That sounds lovely will give them a go.  Do I need a special griddle pan?

post #11 of 15

You can use a standard cupcake/muffin tin. The problem in my experience is that they don't have the thermal mass to do the job as well as these other pans and they release much more poorly. Less "pop" as well. 

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post #12 of 15
Thread Starter 

I was thinking about making basic pie dough and have thinner biscuits, and see how that works

 

Some times in life you don't get everything, at least they might be close to what Mom made yrs ago

post #13 of 15

Hey DND,

 

I'm not particularily fond of baking powder/soda, so I try and avoid it when I can.

 

When I make scones, I use a weird technique.  If you're new to baking, you might not know about puff pastry, but there are a zillion ways to make it.  One way is the "Blitz" or lightning method, where you cube your butter and mix it into the flour, add your water, and make a right mess.  Then you roll it out, fold it, and repeat a few times.  It rises quite well--not as good as classic puff pastry, but still quite well. What happens with puff pastry, is you have a thin layer of dough and a thin layer of fat (usually butter), paper thin layers,actually.  When you bake, the water in the dough turns to steam, but the fat layers prevent/slow it down from escaping, giving you a decent rise.  As it continues to bake, the steam eventually escapes and the fat melts into the dough.

 

So I use this technique with my scones.  If I'm in an extravagant mood, I'll whip some cream, and fold this into the dough--adding another shot of air, which rises when the heat hits it.

 

Being a Canuck, I confess I don't know much about "biscuits", but it would seem that the doughs of biscuits and scones would be somewhat similar.  

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post #14 of 15
Thread Starter 

Howdy Pump

 

I like your plan about layering the dough as I have seen that on the cooking shows too, just thought I could find a easer way

 

That sounds like my best plan for some thick biscuits with honey for breakfast and Pork gravy for dinner

 

Pretty neat idea of trapping the steam and making it work for you

 

DND

post #15 of 15
See the recipe for beaten biscuits in Joy of Cooking, 1976 edition.

Too, I believe if you research old cake recipes beaten egg whites folded into the batter will give the "lift" you need.

Louis DeGoy's "Gold" cookbook is a classic. I'm sure there's a recipe in there for.

The Betty Crocker cookbook from the 1950's has many cake recipes. A nice chocolate cake may be made with soda and buttermilk.

Good luck!
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