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Room temperature meat's bacteria double every fifteen minutes.

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Does anyone think that pouring 100 proof liquor over all sides will slow this down? I'm talking about those circumstances when we have to let our meat lay in the kitchen at room temperature for 1/2 hour or 45 minutes. Let's say, for instance, that it must lay out so it can evaporate some of it's liquid, Or to become completely thawed at a slow pace, instead of using a plastic bag and submerging it in water..

 

Thx,

 

Roger

post #2 of 12

For whole cuts of pork or beef, you'll be fine without the alcohol. Such cuts are routinely left out this way immediately prior to cooking to bring the meat to room temperature. It would be poor practice to do this and then put it back in cold storage.  The only bacteria to worry about are on the exterior. And you'll pasteurize that when you cook it, even if the interior is still rare, or 140 or what ever. Chicken likewise for whole pieces. 

 

Ground meat should not be left out in this way, nor seafood.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 12

What Phatch said! And just to add something. If there is any bacteria on the outside of a steak, chop or chic breast it will be killed when the item is cooked. This is why e.coli is a problem with ground beef because the meat is ground and the bacteria can be spread throughout the mixture. 

post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 

For Pfatch and ChefBillyB,

 

I forgot to mention that truth about larger cuts of meat. I was still hung-up on thin cuts.
Thank you for your replies.

 

Roger

post #5 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefBillyB View Post
 

What Phatch said! And just to add something. If there is any bacteria on the outside of a steak, chop or chic breast it will be killed when the item is cooked. This is why e.coli is a problem with ground beef because the meat is ground and the bacteria can be spread throughout the mixture. 


Steak Tartare????

post #6 of 12
Steak tartare carries increased risk. Do you trust your preparer and the quality and handling of the beef?
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatch View Post

Steak tartare carries increased risk. Do you trust your preparer and the quality and handling of the beef?

Havn't had it before and don't serve it, but how do you insure no e-coli with eating raw  beef?

post #8 of 12
You can't ensure 100%.

The Red Cross already rejects my blood donations because I lived too long in Europe in the 80s. I might have Mad Cow. And the only known test is to dissect the subject's brain.

Some risks are bigger than others, even when you don't know about them.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #9 of 12
Tartare among other things is thin, exposing
more surface. Billy-be-right, anything ground
up is a whole different story, and needs xtra pre
cook care and thorough cooking.
Whole cuts and roastsvarent as dangerous as
people think, for reasons above. Mainly the bacteria
doent permeate the surface but a fraction of an inch.
This is one reason we sear first, then store for service.
If searing isnt preferable, a good salt rub is a deterrent as
well...salt is a natural aneseptic.
post #10 of 12
I grind burgers 5 min before cooking so I can go rare or mid rare. Tartare you would do as close to serving as possible. Takes time to grow bacteria so just limit the time. Or add acid and salt.
post #11 of 12

Never occurred to me to apply booze to a hunk of raw meat in order to inhibit bacterial growth so went in search of answers.

Keep in mind that PROOF is roughly half of PERCENT when liquor is at a temp of 60ish degrees Fahrenheit (meaning 100 proof booze is actually around 50ish percent).

http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/2978/can-liquor-be-used-as-an-emergency-antiseptic

 

mimi

 

The one time I had tartar (was not a fan ;-) cognac was in the mix as well as capers and salt.

Salt (as well as sugar) are great ways to slow bacterial growth (depending on the bug....some may be wiped out while others may actually develop a hard protectant shell (spores).

So on purpose (or not) freshly minced cold meat plus the alcohol and salt can be a trifecta of antibacterial agents.

Altho not so great if any fatal spores have been formed in which case all the above info may be rendered moot.

 

m.

post #12 of 12

@Navregor   I recommend you take a food safety class.  Even if you never plan to serve the public if you like to cook and not get yourself, friends, and family sick it is a worthwhile few hours.

 

One of many things you will learn  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FAT_TOM

 

I expect with proper training you won't ask weird questions like pouring alcohol over meat while you thaw it..

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