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That Darned Cheesecake!!

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

I don't know if here is a thread on a cheesecake or not.  But, here is a new one.  I am looking for any to all advice on that cheesecake recipe!

 

I;ve played around for a year or so on pairing different cheeses and lemon's and limoncello with honey on a cheesecake.  Allowing that balance of sweet and savory in that perfect lite airy bite.  I was wondering though if anyone knew about the ratio of ricotta to cream cheese cheese ratio. Yes im on that one quest for that ultimate traditional cheesecake.  

post #2 of 14

Hi there,

 

Cheesecake baking can be frustrating but once you have a great recipe and follow directions to the "t", it'll come out perfect!

 

I actually don't use ricotta, I find the taste and texture of farmer's cheese more appealing. Here's the recipe I use:

 

1) Cover the bottom and sides of a springform pan with heavy duty aluminum foil.

 

2) Crust:

15 whole graham crackers

3 T sugar

6 T melted butter

Pulse crust ingredients in a food processor to fine crumb consistency, press into the bottom of a springform pan and bake for 15 min on 350.

 

3) Cheesecake batter:

1 lb cream cheese blocks (NOT WHIPPED)

1/2 lb farmer's cheese

1 C sugar

4 eggs

2 T lemon juice

2 t vanilla extract

Beat ingredients in a mixer, then add in 2 C sour cream and mix to incorporate. Pour batter onto crust.

 

4) **this is the most important part: the water bath!

Put your springform into a large aluminum pan and pour water into the pan until it comes halfway up the foil covered springform.

 

5) Bake the cheesecake for 45 min on 350

 

DO NOT open the oven the whole time it is baking - the water bath creates steam in the oven that will prevent the top of the cheesecake from cracking, and opening the oven will let the steam escape, which WILL create cracks.

 

Once the cheesecake is finished baking, turn off the oven and leave the cheesecake inside to cool for hours - for best results, still don't open the oven until it is completely cooled.

 

I like to top my cheesecake with caramel sauce and shaved milk and white chocolate.

Get creative with the toppings and enjoy! 

post #3 of 14
Cheesecake is an egg set custard. Airy and custard do not really go together. The things done to achieve airiness detract from the cheese nature and heritage. Losing the flavor and texture of the fatty cheese. As well as it being custard.

It is about density.

You can pursue airy, but then it's no longer cheesecake imho. It's sonething else altogether.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #4 of 14

Bingo that.

post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
That's the thing though.. People are wanting "healthier" cheesecake options. So, I've been playing with the recipe. Usually, I just bake thing in a 4 inch hotel pan with a 6 inch water bath underneath. And I always dislike using spring form pans. I use ricotta because it blends well to make it lighter. And then over all not lose its nature. ((Gotta go with the flow on what people want ehh.))
post #6 of 14
The make them something whipped with meringue and set in gelatin. But you serve me that and call it cheesecake, you'll lose me a customer.

And it's not really healthier anyway
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 

Thats why i was trying to keep it traditional.  Alot of people are using ricotta mixed with cream cheese into their recipes in the cheesecake for healthier options.  I just was looking for something a tad bit more airy for those healthier customers...  

post #8 of 14

The fat is not bad really compared to sugar. And the ricotta needs more sugar as it's just filler. Yes, I've had decent ricotta cheesecakes, but they're not as good as mascarpone or cream cheese centered cheesecake. They're also much more prone to curdle and have an off texture. My opinion, if you're going to offer cheesecake offer the best. Not something just OK that's masquerading as healthy when it really isn't significant. I've stopped ordering cheesecake at most restaurants as its usually SYSCO junk anymore.  Buca Di Beppo is an exception where their house cheesecake is quite good. 

 

I'd look at something in the souffle family maybe. http://www.greatbritishchefs.com/recipes/lime-souffle-recipe  Light texture, good cheese flavor, citrus accent. This will solve those looking for a lighter cheese dessert imho.  Might also try something in a meringue base. http://sweetapolita.com/2011/04/mascarpone-meringue-cake/

 

But let cheesecake be cheesecake. 

 

Michael Ruhlman wrote a book about attending the CIA as a non pro chef. In it they are discussing the restaurant  the CIA runs that meetsUSDA recommended dietary guidelines and some of their "hacks". They make their cheesecake crust with orange juice. This adds the sugar and and the binding action without the fat, and at least more  nutrition to the base without just sugar. And their serving size was small. The crust is not stable more than about 36 hours though as it goes soggy quickly. The CIA has published this cookbook as well. 

 

https://www.amazon.com/Techniques-Healthy-Cooking-Culinary-Institute/dp/0470635436 The version I read was from about 15 years ago and had a different cover at least. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #9 of 14
Thread Starter 

Now that does give me things to ponder.  A Citrus (Lemony) Graham cracker crust...

post #10 of 14

You really couldn't taste the juice in the crust. It takes very little juice to bind the crust. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #11 of 14

A "lighter healthier cheese-cake" is kinda like "light cigarettes".  phatch ... DO NOT suggest anything that includes gelatin. The OP doesn't like the taste of gelatin. TheCookSaiguim ... could you please explain to me a "a 4 inch hotel pan with a 6 inch water bath underneath"?  Thanks.

post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 
I strongly dislike spring form pans. They always have something that sticks to them. And I've found by putting wax paper and spraying the crap out of it, that you can do a double flip method and releasing the cheesecake to a sheet tray. Make sure to do this cold though. Otherwise it defeats the purpose. I also can then cut any style of shapes from the cheesecake for designing and making the topping art for it. Usually leaving it in the walk in for 22 hours then the freezer for 2 hours and releasing the cheesecake after the freezer. This way after its transferred to a second sheet tray with wax paper and a flat small cutting board, ((one of those cheap flemsy ones that you can bend and fold)) cutting it is just simpler. It's also good for larger portions so you can make the cheesecake only once every 3 days.
post #13 of 14

Oh, the cringe-worthiness of it all!!

post #14 of 14
Thread Starter 
How is any of that cringe worthy? As long as it helps make cheesecakes and makes them right? Then how is it a problem?
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