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Light and Airy Italian Cheesecake Recipe Help! - Page 2

post #31 of 54
Thread Starter 

I have never tried to use green mysore pepper.  I would definitely have to buy some and experiment with it. I do love tellicherry black pepper.  And honetly, I think the green coloring of the mysore would be more pleasant to the eye when it came to the dessert.  ((Perhaps if I crushed it into a fine powder and used it like a small dusting?))  Either way, I really liked your idea of then Meyer Lemon methodology.  Perhaps, I could use the peppercorn in with the zest when im folding into the dessert?  

Quote:
Originally Posted by cheflayne View Post
 

I personally like the sound of it and would probably lean to tellicherry black pepper, although I could also see green mysore pepper working.

 

I have been known to use pepper in desserts, but one thing to keep in mind is what do you think the public perception would be? We can make the greatest dish in the world, but if people don't buy it...well you know.

 

When I use pepper in desserts, I generally do it in prix fixe menus such as wine pairing dinners because it is easier to get people to try it that way. Every time I have done it, people have been blown away and said they would order it in the future if I put it on the menu, but they also admit that they never would have ordered it if I hadn't first slipped in on them via a prix fixe.

 

You all have given me a lot of good idea guys.  And haha Koukouvagia; That is totally true.  Thanks, I totally appreciate it!!!

post #32 of 54

I have used lemon curd in my cheesecake, but with cream cheese.  I just make sure it is mixed in very well and I have not had any problems thus far.

post #33 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by JackieD View Post

I have used lemon curd in my cheesecake, but with cream cheese.  I just make sure it is mixed in very well and I have not had any problems thus far.

If you blend it in all the way I believe you! But them why not go basic and just use lemon zest and juice? The added steps of making a curd seem wasted if not used as a swirl.

Regarding pepper... Forgive me and my classic taste buds but "no", just no. In a savory cheesecake maybe. But in a dessert it would only be successful if the words "innovative flavor profile" is said often enough and in a hypnotic tone of voice.
post #34 of 54
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post


If you blend it in all the way I believe you! But them why not go basic and just use lemon zest and juice? The added steps of making a curd seem wasted if not used as a swirl.

Regarding pepper... Forgive me and my classic taste buds but "no", just no. In a savory cheesecake maybe. But in a dessert it would only be successful if the words "innovative flavor profile" is said often enough and in a hypnotic tone of voice.

Hahaha... Yeah I hear ya Brian.  But, the mass of the people are on this entire new kick about savory and sweet at the same time.  I have made too many desserts lately for folks here that love the stuff.  And honestly, i can see why its a craze, it is actually pretty good.  But, the trick is finding that perfect savory to sweet without over doing it.  Im actually trying to perfect this recipe by November, so i can sell them for thanksgiving.  ((another way for us cooks to make the dough ya know..))  I do thanksgiving and christmas every year for both family and friends.  Then extra is what i sell.  Usually around $40 a pop.  

post #35 of 54
Convince me Chef. Send me a piece. I'll eat it and give you my completely unbiased opinion. I'll gladly be your test Guinea pig! I need to be brought into this new era of savory sweets and sweet savories somehow, right?
post #36 of 54
Thread Starter 

LoL, now that I can do..  You will have to give me your addy for thanksgiving or xmas.  And send you and your family one.  

post #37 of 54

For breakfast I prepared a plate of cantaloupe and proscuitto.  A classic sweet and savory combination made even better by a little bit of cracked black pepper on the melon.  It really is very good.

 

Lemon cheesecake is not something I would consider for Thanksgiving specifically.  It seems seasonally unappealing.  I like mellower spicier cheesecakes during the holidays like pumpkin or cappuccino.  Lemon cheesecake seems more appropriate for easter or a summer bbq to be honest.  

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #38 of 54
Thread Starter 

That may be true koukouvagia, however, I have had two specific requests for my lemon cheesecakes.  They are pretty good.  And my brother has married to a Sicilian.  And she wants a traditional lemon cheesecake.  And she said for me to surprise her on the taste.  Hence why I was thinking the peppercorn. 

post #39 of 54

I adore Meyer lemons but you do need to be mindful of the lower acidity, which may cause a loss in the pucker factor.

Plus the amt of juice you would need to add in order to reach that zing factor may thin out the batter enuf to cause a problem when it comes down to achieving a nice firm slice at service.

Not being a huge fan of extracts ('cept vanilla of course) I keep my baking fridge stocked up with different flavors of oils and emulsions (LorAnn.com is my go to brand).

These oils are so concentrated that mere drops will be enuf to flavor the amt of batter it takes to fill a 10 inch springform pan.

You can discard the extract but keep the measure of lemon juice and zest and add in the oil.

If the batter is still flat tasting, try adding in lemon juice a drop or two at a time.

 

I fist bump you @Koukouvagia for pointing out the seemingly one note profile of the original recipe.

Some bittersweet chocolate sauce or balsamic vinegar sounds really good..... IMO adding in extra sugar would not bring much to the party.

 

mimi

post #40 of 54
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post
 

I adore Meyer lemons but you do need to be mindful of the lower acidity, which may cause a loss in the pucker factor.

Plus the amt of juice you would need to add in order to reach that zing factor may thin out the batter enuf to cause a problem when it comes down to achieving a nice firm slice at service.

Not being a huge fan of extracts ('cept vanilla of course) I keep my baking fridge stocked up with different flavors of oils and emulsions (LorAnn.com is my go to brand).

These oils are so concentrated that mere drops will be enuf to flavor the amt of batter it takes to fill a 10 inch springform pan.

You can discard the extract but keep the measure of lemon juice and zest and add in the oil.

If the batter is still flat tasting, try adding in lemon juice a drop or two at a time.

 

I fist bump you @Koukouvagia for pointing out the seemingly one note profile of the original recipe.

Some bittersweet chocolate sauce or balsamic vinegar sounds really good..... IMO adding in extra sugar would not bring much to the party.

 

mimi

 

I went to the whole Lorann.com and did not come back with a website.  I ended up googling it and got, "http://www.lorannoils.com"  I was wondering if they are one in the same.  Apart from that.. That is awesome and thank you for the tip Flipflopgirl.  Even though, what about the lemon juice reduction and the oil?  I wonder if that would make it pop too much?

post #41 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post
 

Plus the amt of juice you would need to add in order to reach that zing factor may thin out the batter enuf to cause a problem when it comes down to achieving a nice firm slice at service.

 

If you reduce the lemon juice until it is syrupy consistency, the thinning out issue becomes non-existent. I use the same principal when making key lime pie. Eliminates the problem in both cases.

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post #42 of 54
Thread Starter 

Awesome Chef Layne, I was/am curious about the syrup reduction.  Folding it in should not elevate too much pop and it should hold with the consistency on the cheesecake giving it that extra zing. I am definitly going to have to try out several flavor profiling with all the tips you guys have given me. I very much appreciate it all.  Indubitably, i cant weight just to make them and give them out to the local hospital nurses.. just to see who likes what..   

post #43 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheflayne View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post
 

Plus the amt of juice you would need to add in order to reach that zing factor may thin out the batter enuf to cause a problem when it comes down to achieving a nice firm slice at service.

 

If you reduce the lemon juice until it is syrupy consistency, the thinning out issue becomes non-existent. I use the same principal when making key lime pie. Eliminates the problem in both cases.

 

Most of the recipes out there using lots of lemon juice are tightened up with eggs/flour/starch to ensure that pretty slice but the reduction trick is a good one to have in the back pocket :).

It is switching out with Meyers that I found to be problematic....the end result still has a nice lemony flavor but not much of that acid hit (and then the sweeteners just kidnap the entire dish IMO).

Never tried to reduce them but did forget a full ice cube tray in the freezer.

By the time I rediscovered that experiment it was reduced by half and what was left was cloyingly sweet.

Used for a pitcher of lemonade and nope...no pucker.

Maybe it is the soil in which they are planted but my shrubs produce fruits with almost no citric acid.

 

@TheCookSaigium you found it... was kinda in a hurry getting one of the Grands ready for her first day of Kindergarten and should have posted the link but things were pretty hairy around my place lol.

They have few flavors I don't like but there are a few I cannot do without.

Good luck with your Tday dessert table.

Could I mention lemon desserts having an affinity for blackberry?

 

mimi

post #44 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post
 

 

 

Could I mention lemon desserts having an affinity for blackberry?

 

mimi

And blueberry!  

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #45 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post
 

 

 

Could I mention lemon desserts having an affinity for blackberry?

 

mimi

And blueberry!  

 

And blueberry!

 

m.

post #46 of 54
Thread Starter 

lol you guys are cracking me up.  Blackberry, blueberry.  But of course.  I always did have a wonderful blueberry cheesecake with lemon that I have used.  Its one of my favorite cheesecakes.  ((Im a sucker for anything that im familiar with.))  

post #47 of 54
Thread Starter 

Update:  Alright got a chance to make it.  I used a full 32 oz of cream cheese, 2 tbsp of flour, dash of salt, 5 large eggs, 1/4 cup of corn starch, 1 3/4 cup of heavy cream, 1 tsp of Vanilla Paste (Mexican), 10 lemons (Both juice and zest). (Honey in the raw for topping with Crushed Szuechean peppercorn, its all we had until i order more peppercorn.))

Crust:  Simple sponge cake.  ((No true flavoring.))

 

Prep:  I got the eggs and cream cheese to room temperature.  Then I zested the lemons and rendered down the juice.  I then reduced the juice to about 1/4 its original to roughly about 1/2 a cup.  Then I added my sugar to the lemon juice and made a clear simple syrup.  I separated the eggs and made a soft peaks out of the egg whites and blended the egg yolks together with the corn starch and flour.  Then i folded the eggs into the egg whites.  Then slowly folded the vanilla paste and heavy cream into the mixture.  After throwing the cream cheese into the hobart mixer, i let it beat for about 5 minutes.  ((Until it was super soft.))  Then I folded the mixture into the cream cheese. Giving it a nice thick creamy consistency, then i folded in the all but 1/4 a cup lemon syrup reduction.  Then I set this aside and let this rest to give it air.  While I made the Sponge cake and cooked it off.  I then took a small straw and poked holes into the sponge cake.  Then I took 1/4 cup of the lemon syrup and added it to the sponge cake's holes.  Then after it cooled i poured the cheesecake mixture into the sponge caked and cooked it into a stone oven.  ((Without the water bath this time.))  

Topping:  Lemon curd folded with whipped cream and pipped with a tip # 17 (Floral star rose design.)

 

350F for 55 + (20 minutes extra time needed.) at sea level.  


Results.  Everyone did love it.  But, I think the cheesecake came out too rich.  So I might try for something not as dense, like adding ricotta cheese to it or sour cream.  The simple syrup reduction allowed the Lemon to pop with tang, yet was not over bearing, which personally was a great bonus, thank you Cheflayne.  I also liked the idea of the sponge cake crust, but I am going to stick to a more graham cracker crust for the next experiment.  The sponge cake crust came to a nice bonus to the cheesecake.  Yet, it when cut, it wanted to fall apart.  

 

Now, to wait until I get to next Sunday for the next experiment. Which will be Brianshaw's idea of the no bake cheesecake with the reduction.  

post #48 of 54
Thread Starter 

ALSO:

 

Started a limoncello prep:  I used a (Polmos Spirytus) grain alcohol. 750 mL, 750 mL of water, and 750, mL of sugar, 12 lemons and zest of lemons, 1 bunch of lemon grass, which was pureed.

post #49 of 54
If people think the cheesecake is too rich it could be that the portions are too big.


In addition to graham cracker, consider other crispy cookies, like Nabisco Nilla Wafers.
post #50 of 54
Thread Starter 
It was only a one inch tapered pie slice. So, and it was only two people out of the B.O.H. crew that claimed it as such. Even though it did sit heavy, especially with the coffee.
post #51 of 54

Yea I remember making a cheesecake where I forgot to put in the sour cream and it was really really heavy and cheesy.  I'm also careful about the crust, I usually make my crust with lady fingers because they are light and delicious, but cookie cracker crusts are very dense and too sweet for me too.  I'd rather have a big old piece of fluffy cheesecake than a thin small slice of dense cheesecake.  Preferences.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #52 of 54
Thread Starter 
Yeah it is all about preferences. And I do prefer sour cream in my cheesecake as well. I've heard about using ricotta to make it even lighter. Which I might do on the third try.
post #53 of 54
I'd rather have a big piece of dense cheesecake. It takes a whole lot of richness to turn me off!
post #54 of 54
Thread Starter 
Hahahaha BrianShaw yeah I used to be that way back when I was 300 pounds. Now I'm all about that healthier lifestyle. Even though I'd rather pack on 300 situps and 300 pushups. Then miss that cheesecake.
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