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Quick Question: Docking Pastry

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

Hi Guys,

 

 

When poking holes in pastry, do you literally stab through the dough completely (you can flip the dough upside down and see through the poked-hole), or make basically an indentation? And do you poke holes in the side of the pastry as well? 

 

Regards,

KB

post #2 of 5
The reason for docking is to ensure there are no air pockets. If air is trapped between the form and the dough, it will expand during baking, giving you huge bubbles and an un even surface.

So yes, the hole has to go through the dough, but you want the holes as small as possible.
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post #3 of 5
Thread Starter 

Thanks. But I also notice that some recipes call to dock the sides, and some don't. Does it all depend, or is one way the better way for essentially all recipes? 

post #4 of 5

Docking pastry before baking is to prevent the dough from rising. Dough for pies or tarts especially so.

 

You should poke all the way through the dough....and yes....the sides too. Keep the holes tiny.

 

The holes will fill in during baking.

Some recipes have you docking then placing the pan in the fridge or freezer for an hour before baking.

Some recipes call for weighting the dough with foil.

post #5 of 5
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the help guys. smile.gif
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