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What is expected from a Line Cook?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

Hello

 

So as of right know I am at a 2 yr college and after I am done I will transfer to J&W to finish off my bachelor degree. At my college we have to get 180 hrs of field experience before we can graduate. I started in spring of 2016 however I am zipping through everything so fast that I am more than likely to be done by fall of 2017 or maybe even the summer of 2017. So what that means is that I basically should be trying to get on this field experience unless I want to be here longer than I plan to. 

 

I have noticed that I am seeing a lot line cook jobs available in my city but I have been hesitant to go after them because I am bit afraid of rejection. I think this mindset is due to me being intimidated which is due to me wanting to be my best at everything I do despite that not being exactly realistic. With that being said I have decided to bite the bullet and just go to an open interview that is available.

 

What should I wear to an open interview?

I was thinking that I should go in my chef uniform like I have been told but I am not sure if open interviews are different.

FYI I never been to an open interview so this is new to me.

 

A good acquaintance of mines told me that it is good that I wear my school uniform to interviews because employers like to see that you are in school. What do you guys think about that? 

Also I am going to bring my resume, I think that is obvious. However; do you have any advice for how I could sell myself despite not having that much experience?

post #2 of 7

Look clean and neat.  Be on time.  Be straight forward and honest.  Don't worry they won't bite.  Good luck and remember they all started somewhere. 

post #3 of 7

I always liked to see applicants in their street clothes.

Told me a lot about their true nature (clean..no wrinkles...you get my drift).

Shirt with collar and clean, trimmed hair.

Not a lot of makeup or scent (to include shower gel).

Clean shoes (closed toe) with socks.

 

Look the recruiter in the eye and smile when you shake their hand.

You may get a question needing a heartfelt reply so have one ready (my personal favorite usually drew a blank stare "where do you see yourself in ten years").

 

Good luck!

mimi

post #4 of 7

Different people have different perspectives, so I can only tell you mine. If someone showed up to an interview in a chef uniform, my reaction would be "Boy, they are pretty proud of themselves (and I don't mean in a good way".

 

IMO, uniforms belong in the kitchen (and sometimes the dining room), not on the street. It wouldn't be a deal breaker one way or the other, but that would still be my first impression, and ( in homage to Will Rogers) you only get one chance at those.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #5 of 7

+1, I second that. I would probably laugh if someone showed up wearing a student chef's outfit. But my line of work is a tad different than most students would be looking for.

 

Do you expect to cook at your interview?

 

Most places around where I live would never have you do that. Most prospective employers are just looking for a short, sit down, one-on-one interview the first time they see you...in my humble experience... I've never had to cook or stage for any job and I've worked in 18 kitchens and probably went to two or three times as many interviews. 

 

I always ask at an interview if I should bring my knives the first day, or if I can bring my own chef clothes. Sometimes you'll get surprising answers. 

post #6 of 7

Dress clean no chefs jacket thats overkill. I know in school everyone calls each other chef. That doesn't happen in the real world. The only thing you know right now is how to use a knife without killing yourself. The only thing a Chef will know about you is that your interested in cooking because your going to school for it. All that being said, just be yourself. Tell the chef you will work hard and try to learn as fast as possible. You will work in any position needed in the kitchen. Right now you should work in every position in the kitchen. If you work the dish room you learn where everything is located where all the utensils are stored. All people and all positions are important in the kitchen. Respect for these jobs are also important. You will find this out one day when you dishwasher doesn't show up. Don't worry about failing, just don't put yourself in a position to fail. If you begin your career properly, you will move up at the proper pace. In your position you would be best to be a utility person in the kitchen so you can learn every job. This is also a real important person for a chef to have in their kitchen. Have a open mind right now knowing there are bigger and better things to come in your future.........Chef Bill

post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefBillyB View Post

 In your position you would be best to be a utility person in the kitchen so you can learn every job. This is also a real important person for a chef to have in their kitchen. .........Chef Bill

 

Great advice.

Like in baseball one of the most important people in the kitchen is someone who is competent enuf to slot into most of the stations.

If your particular leadership does not cross train ask why.

It may not have occurred to them to do so.

 

mimi


Edited by flipflopgirl - 8/30/16 at 8:26am
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