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To mop or not to mop?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

We're making ribs and we can't decide if we want to mop them or not.  I've got them rubbed with salt/pepper/garlic/onion/paprika/mustard/thyme/oregano and I don't want to add sweetness.  I also don't want to jeopardize the crust.  They'll be fine without a mop right?

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #2 of 14

LOL. How long have you been here?!? A question like yours ... on a topic like ribs ... could/will get answers from across the entire spectrum of "rib-making". 

 

From the way you're asking, I think you're looking for a "no mop" answer. I'll be happy to give it to you. 

 

You'll be just fine without mopping.

post #3 of 14
What rib? I treat pork rib almost exactly as you wrote (but I will put a bit of brown sugar in the rub) and never mop them.
post #4 of 14
Thread Starter 

spare ribs, thanks

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post
 

LOL. How long have you been here?!? A question like yours ... on a topic like ribs ... could/will get answers from across the entire spectrum of "rib-making". 

 

 

It's been a while since there's been an interesting conversation around here.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #6 of 14

Good point. Mine was that you'll get 50/50 YES or NO. 

post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post
 

 

It's been a while since there's been an interesting conversation around here.

<This post has been deleted.>

post #8 of 14
Thread Starter 

So we mopped 50% of the ribs and the rest we left dry :p

0

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #9 of 14
To me mopping is about the texture of the rub and how it s behaving during cooking. A coarser rub forms bark better if you give a little bit of mopping along the way. If the rub is fine enough you can get pretty good bark from the moisture coming off the ribs naturally.

A mustard slather helps in both cases.

Of course cooking here at high altitude and low humidity, those can be contributing factors to my theory too. I just can't control for those variables to tell.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #10 of 14

I mop every hour with a 50/50 cider vinegar/olive oil mix. It sets the rub and helps form a great bark. But I also put the rub on very heavy in the beginning because yes you do lose some.

post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post
 

They'll be fine without a mop right?


Bit late to the party but the short answer is: yes. I rarely mop my ribs. In fact the only times I do mop them is when I make a marinade that has a strong character, for example a vietnamese fish sauce/lemongrass/cilantro marine, and I want a strong taste of the marinade. Then I keep mopping more marinade on top of the ribs. 

 

Please understand that I'm not saying that one should never mop ribs. I'm just saying that it's perfectly possible to make great ribs without mopping them. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post
 

So we mopped 50% of the ribs and the rest we left dry :p

... were you able to tell them apart? What would you say is the difference? 

post #12 of 14

So thanks to all of you for your helpful suggestions. It helped also..

post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 
I could tell them apart in terms of flavor but they were both juice and had a great texture. Thanks all!

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #14 of 14

I usually don't mop ribs, but I have on occasion, especially if they are thicker and more meaty.  Babybacks, though, never get mopped.  No need to, IMHO, as they don't take that long anyway.

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