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Discouraged at Current Job

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

I was standing there at the pre-shift and I was in utter shock the words that were coming out of his mouth.  Maybe he was having an incredibly rough day.  They did catch one of the prep cooks sleeping on the clock.

 

EC: I am not here to mentor or teach you.  You come in you pump out orders at your station and come back to do the same thing tomorrow.

 

Sous: Once you leave this job and walk out these doors, I will forget your face and pretend you never existed.

 

 

Well then...this being my first job out in the field--not so great.  I came into this hungry and wanting to develop my skills.  Don't get me wrong, I won't quit striving for more, but I've got a gut feeling about this.  I'm not saying BOH is supposed to be joining hands and singing 'Kumbaya'.  I was expecting mentorship and networking.

post #2 of 8

There is nothing standard in the industry, especially management style. There are managers who mentor. There are mangers who don't. When you interviewed for the job, did you interview them? Interviews should be a two way street.

 

They need to select someone who they think will fit their organization, but the second side is up to you; you need to select an organization that you think will fit your goals and aspirations.

 

Interview potential employers hard. Ask tough questions. Listen to the answers, both verbal and non-verbal.  Do your due diligence. Ask for a tour. Ask to speak to employees. Ask to observe a shift. Evaluate, evaluate, evaluate.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #3 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheflayne View Post
 

There is nothing standard in the industry, especially management style. There are managers who mentor. There are mangers who don't. When you interviewed for the job, did you interview them? Interviews should be a two way street.

 

They need to select someone who they think will fit their organization, but the second side is up to you; you need to select an organization that you think will fit your goals and aspirations.

 

Interview potential employers hard. Ask tough questions. Listen to the answers, both verbal and non-verbal.  Do your due diligence. Ask for a tour. Ask to speak to employees. Ask to observe a shift. Evaluate, evaluate, evaluate.

Truer words were never spoken.

 

Many times people who are looking for work will be so blindsided by the fact that they are trying to impress a potential manager, when it should be the other way around.

Even if you are out of work, you still have your ethics and standards for them to impress you.

post #4 of 8
Thread Starter 
Thank you for those words of wisdom. I'm really glad that you both took the time to explain. When I met the chef, I was blown away by what he was telling me about molding young cooks. I should have asked to observe a shift. I talked to only one employee and should have talked to more.

I will take this with me on my next potential employer. What would be categorized as hard questions?
post #5 of 8
I think you have to factor in the relationship you have with the Chef.

There is no law or rule--written or unwritten that says the Chef HAS to mentor you. All s/he really has to do is pay you the agreed salary.

That being said I really enjoy mentoring cooks, BUT....

Show up consistently late, yap/text on your phone during work, show no interest in anything, or even worse, ask stupid questions, and I will have no interest and no incentive to show that person anything but the absolute bare minimum.

We're all human, we get p.o.'d and we have employees that we don't like but we are professional enough to tolerate them during working hours.

I'm not saying you have to kiss butt and get my coffee every hour, but if the cook isn't interested in learning, or demands or feels s/ he is entitled to mentorship, it ain't gonna happen
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by brewhaha View Post

 What would be categorized as hard questions?

 

What have you enjoyed the most about working here? What have least enjoyed about working here? Do you have any questions about my qualifications? How long was the person who previously had the position here and why did they leave? If short time, ask about person before that, etc, etc, etc, How would you describe your management style? What is the company’s culture?

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheflayne View Post
 

 

What have you enjoyed the most about working here? What have least enjoyed about working here? Do you have any questions about my qualifications? How long was the person who previously had the position here and why did they leave? If short time, ask about person before that, etc, etc, etc, How would you describe your management style? What is the company’s culture?

Great questions.

I might add that the answers to those questions will tell you a lot, but you have to listen carefully.

 

Particularly the one about why the previous person left and how long they worked prior to leaving.

If management turns ugly and starts berating that person, you may want to consider looking someplace else.

Professionals do not talk about the failings of past employees in front of applicants.

post #8 of 8

I'm sorry you are discouraged, if it helps, (and I'm sure I speak for everyone here)

We've all been there.

 

As others have said; good days, bad days. When the bad days start to outweigh the good, then it's definitely time to dust off the resume. Keep in mind that the grass is always greener on the other side of the fence too LOL

 

It NEVER hurts to look around as long as it's done descretely. As you are a student, if this is an internship; the EC is sorely mistaken. It is his job to mentor you, (personal opinion) it's why he has interns (although the labor is of course a bonus)

Depending on where you are, summers are stressful. Transient workers, tourists, long hours, heat, humidity and vendors that don't care that it's 14:00 on a Friday and you needed to start prepping for service early morning... sigh. We're all ready to kill each other here too.

Honestly, I wouldn't take it personally. Finding someone asleep on the job when the kitchen is getting their asses handed to them is reason enough to make a general announcement that everyone is expendable.

 

So back to the interviewing process; great answers have already been given, but I would also ask,

'what are your expectations of me'

'do you promote within'

'how long has the current brigade been here'

'how often are reviews made' (not necessarily financial, but skill set as well. You can't perform well if you don't know what the expectations are and don't have a yardstick)

and

'is this a new position or filling one that became open' (followed by, how long the other employee was there presuming that someone left)

 

Good luck! Stiff upper lip....

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