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Is there really no sugar in margharitas?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

I was reading up on margharitas on https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margarita and found no mention of mixing in any sugar or sugar syrup, other than the option to have sugar on the rim (here in southern california margharitas you are offered the option of salt on the rim, but I've never seen sugar on the rim).

 

So do some people really put no sugar at all in their margharitas? It sounds like it would be quite tart.

 

The IBA (International Bar Association) also does not mention sugar: http://iba-world.com/cocktails/margarita/

post #2 of 11
Were you.......happy or UNhappy about it?
Most people and many bars, use ready made margarita mix, many of
which contain high fructose corn syrup. Basically a soluable form
of sugar.
Unless theyre sugar free, in which case they use sucralose or some
other sugar substitute. IMO those are worse for you than sugar.
post #3 of 11
Margaritas come in all shapes, sizes, flavor, and states of matter. And I would drink any of them. My favorite is a good tequila with gran marnier (instead of triple sec), and fresh lime juice over ice in a salt rimmed glass. No sugar. In a 3-2-1 ratio. Not too tart at all
Edited by Planethoff - 9/3/16 at 6:50pm
post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Planethoff View Post

Margaritas come in all shapes, sizes, flavor, and states of matter. And I would drink any of them. My favorite is a good tequila with gran marnier (instead of triple sec), and fresh lime juice over ice in a salt rimmed glass. No sugar. In a 3-2-1 ratio. Not too tart at all


Thanks, that's exactly what I ended up doing tonight. Or at least I think so, it's hard to do math right now and it's hard to remember what happened earlier tonight. But ..... it was good. :)

post #5 of 11

I agree a margarita should not be a 500 calorie beverage.  Most mixes are horrific on the sugar content so I end up with heartburn if I drink them.

post #6 of 11

FF, a Margarita needs some sweetness to balance out the tartness of the lime juice and the punch of the tequila, but they should not be overly sweet, in my opinion, although, like Planethoff, I'd be hard pressed to turn down any Margarita offered to me.  In classic Margarita recipes that sweetness comes from the liqueur that is used in it.  In cheaper Margaritas that takes the form of Triple Sec.  In higher end Margaritas it is often Cointreau or some other higher end orange liqueur.  And in most places today it is the HFCS that comes in the crappy mixes that they use.  At home, if I'm making them on the rocks (sorry but if I'm making flavored, blended I usually just use mix bumped up with additional fresh juice) I use Cointreau and my homemade sour mix which makes them a bit on the sweeter side but not too sweet as I usually go a bit lighter on the Cointreau and heavier on the sour mix.

post #7 of 11

IMO those premixed Margarita products are already overly sweet to begin with.

 

I prefer to enjoy the drink made from freshly squeezed lime. It may be time consuming but you can sure tell.

 

My boss will muddle a sugar cube with Gran Marnier before adding the Tequila.

Big difference and very tasty.....

post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete View Post
 

FF, a Margarita needs some sweetness to balance out the tartness of the lime juice and the punch of the tequila, but they should not be overly sweet, in my opinion, although, like Planethoff, I'd be hard pressed to turn down any Margarita offered to me.  In classic Margarita recipes that sweetness comes from the liqueur that is used in it.  In cheaper Margaritas that takes the form of Triple Sec.  In higher end Margaritas it is often Cointreau or some other higher end orange liqueur.  And in most places today it is the HFCS that comes in the crappy mixes that they use.  At home, if I'm making them on the rocks (sorry but if I'm making flavored, blended I usually just use mix bumped up with additional fresh juice) I use Cointreau and my homemade sour mix which makes them a bit on the sweeter side but not too sweet as I usually go a bit lighter on the Cointreau and heavier on the sour mix.


Thanks Pete. So classic margaritas really don't have any sugar, or sweet and sour mix added other than the grand-mariner or cointreau? That sounds overly tart to me, and I'm not a huge sugar fan by any means!

post #9 of 11

They tend to be pretty tart, but still balanced, but then again, they also, originally, were a smallish drink, not these monstrous things that they are now so being a tart drink wouldn't have been a bad thing.

post #10 of 11

I agree with most above.  This is my recipe which is similar to those above with a twist.

 
 
 
Top Shelf Margarita
 
2 parts José CuervoTradicional Tequila® (100% Blue Agave)
1 part Grand Marnier®
1 part fresh squeezed lime juice
Splash of fresh squeezed grapefruit juice
Shake with ice in cocktail shaker until frothy. Serve in salt rim margarita glass. Garnish with lime slice
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimyra View Post
 

I agree with most above.  This is my recipe which is similar to those above with a twist.

 
 
 
Top Shelf Margarita
 
2 parts José CuervoTradicional Tequila® (100% Blue Agave)
1 part Grand Marnier®
1 part fresh squeezed lime juice
Splash of fresh squeezed grapefruit juice
Shake with ice in cocktail shaker until frothy. Serve in salt rim margarita glass. Garnish with lime slice


Grapefruit and tequila are great together!

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