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Looking for good stainless 270mm or 240mm gyuto for under $250 - Page 2

post #31 of 51
Thread Starter 

Yeah, I don't give a rats patootie about damascus or whatever. If someone could make an awesome stamped knife for $50 that beat the pants off of just about any hand forged knife at even 10 times the price, I'd buy it. Bling is for people who have to have matching everything in their block, which as I've learned is a huge waste of money.

 

For me, it's all about comfort and how well the darn thing cuts.

post #32 of 51
Thread Starter 

@foody518 I went with the Rika 5k since the other 6k we were talking about is out of stock.

 

I'll order the Itinomonn in a few weeks.

 

Thanks for your help.

post #33 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by DevOpsProDude View Post
 

@foody518 I went with the Rika 5k since the other 6k we were talking about is out of stock.

 

I'll order the Itinomonn in a few weeks.

 

Thanks for your help.

Hope you enjoy the heck out of it!

Did you get a medium grit stone as well?

post #34 of 51

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/88514/itinomonn-sale/30#post_528270 commentary on how the edge on the Itinomonn will likely come in - microbevel is your friend

post #35 of 51
Thread Starter 

@foody518 Yeah, the Bester 1200, just as you recommended.

post #36 of 51

Awesome, hopefully (at least) one of your current knives is a candidate to start practicing sharpening on! :)

post #37 of 51
Thread Starter 

@foody518 Yeah, I have a forged knife from IKEA (where else can you get a forged knife for $10?) and a Calphalon carving knife I can practice on.

 

Also just bought the Itinomonn V2 270mm gyuto, so thanks for that. I guess since I live in Oregon, I didn't need to pay the VAT. Ended up being $231.

post #38 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by DevOpsProDude View Post
 

@foody518 Yeah, I have a forged knife from IKEA (where else can you get a forged knife for $10?) and a Calphalon carving knife I can practice on.

 

Also just bought the Itinomonn V2 270mm gyuto, so thanks for that. I guess since I live in Oregon, I didn't need to pay the VAT. Ended up being $231.

Cool, and I think it might eventually be worth going back to the Shun and possibly solving your drifting/steering problem on that too. First knives I practiced on were I think a Cutco and a 'Calphalon Pro Forged', or whatever (that I promptly gifted out after it had a proper edge).

 

Did you get a 400-500 grit stone as well? I think the general advice is to stick to a medium grit stone for learning, but personally I go back and forth on that. On some thicker stainless and existing knives with some use/abuse the coarse makes things go faster. Just reapply marker/sharpie *frequently* so you're providing constant visual reinforcement of what you're doing and feel the edge for burr carefully, which helps build correct muscle memory of your sharpening motion (and not an hour of what the heck am I doing, learn from my pitfalls XD)

 

We don't pay VAT on European products :)

post #39 of 51
Lucky b*******!

Yes, the steering and wedging should be addressed. When the blade has got fat behind the edge, wedging may occur. But the tendency to steer as well becomes much more evident than before.
Please be aware that steering may be compensated somewhat by the user. To a certain degree it is an individual question.
First thing to do is heavy thinning, on both sides, at the lowest angle you're comfortable with, until you've almost reached the very edge. There are thinning techniques that allow you to get much further but they will scratch the half of the blade.
Once this modest thinning done, please verify the very edge. Some touch ups may be required.
Test for steering. If it steers clockwise, friction is higher on the right side than on the left one. Thin a bit more on the right side to reduce friction, or increase the angle on the left one, and build there a straight bevel -- no convexed one, as the main purpose is to increase friction.
It may seem a bit complicated but once you've got the idea it's very simple.
post #40 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benuser View Post

Lucky b*******!

Yes, the steering and wedging should be addressed. When the blade has got fat behind the edge, wedging may occur. But the tendency to steer as well becomes much more evident than before.
Please be aware that steering may be compensated somewhat by the user. To a certain degree it is an individual question.
First thing to do is heavy thinning, on both sides, at the lowest angle you're comfortable with, until you've almost reached the very edge. There are thinning techniques that allow you to get much further but they will scratch the half of the blade.
Once this modest thinning done, please verify the very edge. Some touch ups may be required.
Test for steering. If it steers clockwise, friction is higher on the right side than on the left one. Thin a bit more on the right side to reduce friction, or increase the angle on the left one, and build there a straight bevel -- no convexed one, as the main purpose is to increase friction.
It may seem a bit complicated but once you've got the idea it's very simple.

@DevOpsProDude So something you could try in the case of your existing Shun - as Benuser says, thin both sides first. Then, carefully try to cut as vertical/perpendicular to your board as you can, and then observe for which way the knife drifts/steers (into the food or away from the food). If for example you're a righty and the knife digs further into the bulk of the onion while you're trying to cut straight up and down, then consider playing with the bevels so that the left bevel (left when your knife edge is directed at the board vs in the air) is at a more obtuse angle than the right while the edge is still fairly centered within the knife (probably not appropriate to skew your cutting edge extremely towards the left or the right face), 'encouraging' the knife to not turn that direction.

post #41 of 51
Thread Starter 

By the way, did I mention that the steering issue only happens with onions?

 

To be honest, we just got them sharpened by Kai and I haven't tried cutting much since, so I probably should.

 

--Alex

post #42 of 51
I should have added: loosen your grip may help a lot with steering. Most users of Japanese knives compensate by very slightly turning the blade clockwise in my example to increase left side friction and reduce right side one. My example is taken from typical Japanese double-bevelled knives that have slightly off-centered edges to the left, which eases food release and making thin slices.
post #43 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by DevOpsProDude View Post
 

By the way, did I mention that the steering issue only happens with onions?

 

To be honest, we just got them sharpened by Kai and I haven't tried cutting much since, so I probably should.

 

--Alex

It tends to occur more commonly cutting through harder, denser foods and/or through the bulk of the food (bisect, as opposed to cutting slices). Where you have a lot of resistance from the food and friction of increased blade area in contact with it.

 

Hoping that with some good sharpening practice that in not too long you'll get to the point where you'll blow that free Kai sharpening out of the water :)))

post #44 of 51
Thread Starter 

Got the new knife and wow is it totally amazeballs. Cuts like a dream. It is as far away from the Shuns as the Shuns are from the Wusthofs.

 

Only complaint is that the handle is raw wood, but I treated it with mineral oil and it feels a lot better...nice D shaped handle too.

 

But yeah, boy does it cut.

 

Now I'm looking at a coarse stone to get for changing bevels, and maybe something for flattening stones.

 

Does anyone use slurry stones?

 

Thanks much @foody518 !

post #45 of 51
The edge is so thin on a new knife changing bevels you can do on 1000 grit no problem. You only need coarse for thinning and serious repairs like big chips
post #46 of 51
Ah didn't read all your posts. For the shun the work would go way faster. Also congrats on the new knife. That first cutting experience is what it's all about! You're in a different world now
post #47 of 51

"It is as far away from the Shuns as the Shuns are from the Wusthofs."  Now you know first hand why we don't recommend Shun, welcome to the club.

 

For the stones that you have there is no need for a slurry stone as they slurry up easy enough.  They do get used a lot on Japanese naturals, mostly for modifying their properties to acquire certain aesthetic finishes, and the harder stones to start a slurry, and some of the finer synthetic stones in the 10K+ range (mostly I think because they clog).


Edited by Rick Alan - 10/2/16 at 5:24am
post #48 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by MillionsKnives View Post

Ah didn't read all your posts. For the shun the work would go way faster. Also congrats on the new knife. That first cutting experience is what it's all about! You're in a different world now
post #49 of 51

Congrats - the Itinomonn V2 is my current favorite gyuto - it cuts better than some of the custom maker ones I used to own.  

post #50 of 51

Millions was, of course, referring to using the extra course stone to speed thinning the heavy edge of the shun, which would take forever with and dish the hell out of a medium stone.

post #51 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by DevOpsProDude View Post
 

Got the new knife and wow is it totally amazeballs. Cuts like a dream. It is as far away from the Shuns as the Shuns are from the Wusthofs.

 

Only complaint is that the handle is raw wood, but I treated it with mineral oil and it feels a lot better...nice D shaped handle too.

 

But yeah, boy does it cut.

 

Now I'm looking at a coarse stone to get for changing bevels, and maybe something for flattening stones.

 

Does anyone use slurry stones?

 

Thanks much @foody518 !

Nice! 

Yeah keep oiling it when needed. Helps a bit with stain resistance too

You can look at roughly the 400-500 grit for light to moderate reshaping and quick bevel set. Flattening solution choices are largely a factor of how much you want to spend on them.

Neither the Bester 1200 nor the Rika 5k should need a slurry stone when adequately soaked (that is, not using them after a too-short soak in which it's drying up on you frequently during use). They are pretty good about shedding abrasive and generating some mud.

Honestly thanks goes to Millions for spreading the Itinomonn love XD

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