or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Clear stock - Page 4

post #91 of 99
I highly recommend them for many purposes outside of the obvious canning abilities. They are great for parcooking tough meats. Beans(pintos) can be had in 30 minutes from dry. Pork hocks turn into gelatin in and fall apart in 75 minutes. It's a worthwhile product to play around with. Some things work very well. Others not so much like any cooking method. Experiment and see where it can cut some time out or do a better job than currently used methods. If you live near Austin I would gladly loan you my spare. If you buy try to get one with a gauge. The rockers alone don't give enough control for many things.
post #92 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodpump View Post

In regards to 1),

In regards to 4), I must confess Im just an old cook, constantly looking for the best, quickest, and labour and space saving methods for doing anything. While the method you describe is interesting, making stock with an open pot is much quicker, easier, less prone to accidents ( hotel pans full of lspillable, thin liquid in a walk in is an accident waiting to happen. Sorry just my experience working in kitchens for 35 years), albeit requiring some planning, and good cooking practices.

Pretty much everything I have written here is covered in Peterson's "Sauces"

I entirely agree. Ice-filtration is not for the regular working cook in a normal restaurant. It's a hobby thing for the home cook, or a devoted technique for the would-be "modernist" restaurant. It works, but it has its dangers, and you've just pointed to a major one.

Peterson's account is excellent and should be a major point of reference for anyone wanting a classic approach. NOT a criticism--that's the place to go!



Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
post #93 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodpump View Post
 

 

Here's an experiment:

Take two identical teabags, drop one in a cup.  First cup you fill up with 100 C boiling water, the other cup with 75-85 C water.  Wait a few minutes.

 

Which cup has a weak, muddy flavor?  Which cup has a clean pronounced flavor.?

 

You get the best extraction  flavours well under the boiling point.  Any coffee machine expert/repairman can tell you that.

 

I'm not sure how coffee comes into the picture, but I hope you're talking about green tea there; if someone offers me a cup of black tea made with water that's stopped boiling 2 minutes ago, I'd probably throw it in their face ;) (but then I see far worse tea-related atrocities committed in this country)

 

Back to topic though, another technique I've seen is to blanche the bones and discard the water, which apparently helps eliminate most of the scum / impurities in the first pass, doing away with the need to skim, but apparently also reducing the possibility of cloudiness. Though I've not tried this myself, and haven't particularly ever needed my stock to be clear.

 

It's funny though, and being new around here I hesitated posting this for a while, not wanting to "stir the pot" as it were, but my equating stock with "flavoured water" in another post (to prove a point) was rather frowned upon ;)

post #94 of 99

I only just read the last few posts and this talk of clarifying beer reminds me of an article I read recently: http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-37350233

 

..regarding a gelatin called isinglass which is used to clarify beer. Of course, living in Belgium, with the privilege of having access to all these wonderful beers (most of which are cloudy), I don't see the point in needing to clarify a beer, but I guess that's a cultural thing.

 

But to the point, I wonder if a similar process could be used for stock? I think I saw some references to something similar in the thread, and some further research seems to indicate that this is actually the case.

 

As for pressure cookers, I've been using one for a while, and while we don't (easily) find 15psi models here in Europe, I now exclusively make stocks in the pressure cooker. In 2 hours I can get the same level of gelatin extraction and flavour compared to an overnight low simmer (for a brown beef stock). I also recently found bags of chicken feet at the Asian supermarket which I bought for chicken stock, and they were fully broken down in under an hour, IIRC.

post #95 of 99
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisLehrer View Post

Peterson's account is excellent and should be a major point of reference for anyone wanting a classic approach. NOT a criticism--that's the place to go!

 

 Yes, his book is terrific.  I second the recommendation.

post #96 of 99
Isinglass is a gelatin, made from the float bladders of certain fish, also used as a glue--gelatin and hide glue are very, very similiar.

But if everyone thinks Peyerson's book is great, why am I the only one highlighting his stuff?
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
post #97 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by smyrf View Post
 

..regarding a gelatin called isinglass which is used to clarify beer. Of course, living in Belgium, with the privilege of having access to all these wonderful beers (most of which are cloudy), I don't see the point in needing to clarify a beer, but I guess that's a cultural thing.

 

But to the point, I wonder if a similar process could be used for stock? I think I saw some references to something similar in the thread, and some further research seems to indicate that this is actually the case.

 

 

 

Yes, but the stock will not have as rich of a mouth feel and will not gel when cold because all gelatin is removed by using this as a filtration method.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
post #98 of 99

Ok, as someone already did previously, I'll now throw in crock pot. between heat control on an open pot and trouble getting to the scum in a pressure cooker, I now think crock pot.

  I also feel we're throwing around the term raft to casual. It's more difficult to adjust heat as an open stock. There is the flame and the pot position. For a raft to do it's job there has to be a roll going on for circulation. For me, there was more anxiety waiting to see if my raft was going to break than putting 5k on 33 at a roulette table and watch the ball go round and round.

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
post #99 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheflayne View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by smyrf View Post
 

..regarding a gelatin called isinglass which is used to clarify beer. Of course, living in Belgium, with the privilege of having access to all these wonderful beers (most of which are cloudy), I don't see the point in needing to clarify a beer, but I guess that's a cultural thing.

 

But to the point, I wonder if a similar process could be used for stock? I think I saw some references to something similar in the thread, and some further research seems to indicate that this is actually the case.

 

 

 

Yes, but the stock will not have as rich of a mouth feel and will not gel when cold because all gelatin is removed by using this as a filtration method.

A very good point. Obviously, if that's a significant concern, one could simply add plain gelatin back at the end.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking