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Lets talk steak

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

I know how to season and cook steak is largely a matter personal preference.  I'm a pretty good practical cook but know I lack knowledge in the theory or science of cooking.  Here is how I prep NY and Rib-eye steaks either the grill or in a cast iron pan and finish in the oven.  Please criitque my method.  I don't really remember why I adopted this method or if there are any flaws in my technique. 

 

I mix equal parts salt, pepper, granulated garlic, and onion powder and rub about 1/2 to 3/4 teaspoon on each side, as well as the edges, particularly the fat.  I then brush them with a neutral oil such as safflower oil, wrap them in plastic, and marinate in the refrigerator for several hours if possible.  An hour before cooking I take them out of the fridge.  I then cook them on high heat to sear both sides and finish in indirect heat on the cool side of the grill or in the oven at 450. Thoughts appreciated.  

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If you make a pizza you can eat for a day.  If you make two pizzas you can eat for a day.
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post #2 of 11

I rarely use powdered spices on my steaks. If your steak is good quality, S & P is pretty much all it needs. I do make an exception when I grill ti-tip, then that gets rubbed with garlic powder, sometimes a bit of paprika even. While powdered onion/garlic will initially seem like they enhance the flavor of your steak, after a while you realize it actually masks the beef flavor, which is a shame IMO. 

 

I don't wrap in plastic and/or marinate. I don't always brush with olive oil, but if I do I first brush with olive oil then season with S & P and bam, on the grill, or in the pan. No waiting. 

 

I cook my steaks at high heat, don't finish in the oven or on a cool side of the grill (btw 450 is quite hot for finishing a steak no?). I like the steaks medium rare, which I typically achieve by grilling or pan-frying for about 2-3 mn on each side at high temp (depending on the thickness). 

 

I like to rest the steak before serving. On the grill, I just turn off the grill, close the lid and let the steak rest there while I set the table or prep something else, 5 or 10mn top. 

 

And finally I nearly always season with S & P again after cooked and sliced, or in my plate as I slice and eat. I find that there's a huge difference between applying S & P before or after cooking, and IMO doing both results in the best of both worlds. 

post #3 of 11

Someone will come along and tell you that everything you're doing is wrong.  A few years ago I would find all kinds of things wrong with your method.  But the zen lady I am now has learned that there are different ways to approach this and all turns out well.  

 

Sometimes I do as you do, which is called dry brining except for the oil, I do not use oil.  Just salt and leave in the fridge for a few hours. Sometimes I add fresh garlic and herbs to it the dry brine as well.

 

Sometimes I season the steak moments before I grill it.

 

Sometimes I cook the steak outside on the grill.

 

Sometimes I cook it in a pan and finish in the oven, or just baste and baste and baste with butter until it's done.

 

I never season with powdered spices because they tend to burn bitter.  

 

Whatever you do it will be fine as long as the meat is quality and you don't over cook it.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #4 of 11

I do almost exactly the same.

 

The only difference is that I do not put my steaks back in the fridge after seasoning. I put down a paper towel under a cookie cooling rack, put the steaks on the rack, and then cover with a paper towel to ward off any devilish house flies. I allow the steaks to warm for about 5 hours (with all the salt, it should be fine).

 

I do not oil the steaks, as a wet steak will not sear as quickly. Instead, right before putting them down on the grill, I oil the grill great with a bit of shortening on a paper towel.

 

If you want to try stepping up the flavor a bit, try this stuff

https://www.amazon.com/Gourmet-Collection-Garlic-Onion-Spice/dp/B008880B7I/ref=sr_1_17_a_it?srs=8412905011&ie=UTF8&qid=1475114009&sr=8-17

(if you want it to be even more flavorful, grind this stuff up in a mortar and pestle first).

Then I char the outside very well (I like gristle) and very fast, then rest for 10 minutes on a plate, with a sheet of aluminum foil laid on top (but not wrapped)

 

It's a lot more than just garlic and onion, and it's amazing. Found some at a local department store and I am thinking about ordering several crates of the stuff, just in case it disappears like the hickory seasoning that I used to use. It's also great for making seasoned butter with, for baked potato's.

post #5 of 11

I like my Strips in a pan, Ribeye on a grill.  My favorite pan method is to first render some beef fat in the pan, sear the steaks, add mushrooms, thyme, whole garlic, and butter to make a baste, and continually baste it as it cooks.

 

http://www.cheftalk.com/a/beef-in-a-pan-demystified

post #6 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by kuan View Post
 

I like my Strips in a pan, Ribeye on a grill.  My favorite pan method is to first render some beef fat in the pan, sear the steaks, add mushrooms, thyme, whole garlic, and butter to make a baste, and continually baste it as it cooks.

 

http://www.cheftalk.com/a/beef-in-a-pan-demystified

I also like my ribeye on the grill, although I season and prepare it exactly the same way. To prevent sticking I just oil the grill grate with a little shortening on a paper tower, right before I put the steak on.

 

I like the ribeye in the pan method, for the delicious pan sauce.

 

Steak is always delicious, unless my father cooks it.

 

He gets very thin filets, pounds them flat, and then seasons them with TERIYAKI SAUCE. Then cooks them "medium" (in reality, they're well done, he doesn't know the difference as far as I can tell).

 

How he does that, then makes the fluffiest, moistest, most amazing scrambled eggs I have ever tasted, is beyond me.

post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thanks everyone.  I've seen others as well just say to use only S and P.  I'll try that next time.  FF if 450 is to hot to finish the steaks what then 300-350? (I usually buy pretty thick steaks so some time finishing is necessary, especially to get Mrs. Hanks closer to medium as she prefers)   Also does letting them sit in the fridge after seasoning do no good?

If you make a pizza you can eat for a day.  If you make two pizzas you can eat for a day.
Reply
If you make a pizza you can eat for a day.  If you make two pizzas you can eat for a day.
Reply
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hank View Post
 

Thanks everyone.  I've seen others as well just say to use only S and P.  I'll try that next time.  FF if 450 is to hot to finish the steaks what then 300-350? (I usually buy pretty thick steaks so some time finishing is necessary, especially to get Mrs. Hanks closer to medium as she prefers)   Also does letting them sit in the fridge after seasoning do no good?

As I said before, seasoning the steak ahead of time is considered dry brining.  No oil is involved in dry brining.  I often do a dry brine for roasts but it works for steak too.  It flavors and tenderizes the meat.  Check out this method http://www.tastingtable.com/entry_detail/national/16929/How_to_Make_the_Perfect_Steak.htm  It really does make a very good steak.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #9 of 11

Actually you know what I haven't had since I moved out of the kitchen is a steak done in one of those infrared broilers.

 

http://cdnimg.webstaurantstore.com/images/products/medium/215181/963476.jpg

post #10 of 11

Hank, Your way, my way, everyone has a method. Talk with ten people you'll find ten different ways to cook a steak. Most restaurants will just do a S&P, I do the same and sometime throw on a cajun seasoning. All that being said, the main thing is to buy good quality steaks. I wouldn't recommend buying steaks at a supermarket. There just isn't enough aging or marbling in the steaks. Find a local butcher that will hang their sides before showcasing the meat. IMHO and because we don't eat steak all the time, the steak we do buy s/b a fine quality. 

post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hank View Post
 

Thanks everyone.  I've seen others as well just say to use only S and P.  I'll try that next time.  FF if 450 is to hot to finish the steaks what then 300-350? (I usually buy pretty thick steaks so some time finishing is necessary, especially to get Mrs. Hanks closer to medium as she prefers)   Also does letting them sit in the fridge after seasoning do no good?


I would set the oven to 375F but as I suggested there may be no need for an oven at all. In restaurants, ovens are always on, and stovetop burners are limited, so the instant they achieve the right color on the steak, they throw it in the oven to finish while freeing up the stovetop burner for something else. But at home, often you don't need to free up that burner, and it's overkill to pre-heat a big oven just to finish a small steak. IMO for a 1"1/4 thick NY or Rib-eye served medium-rare, there's no need to finish in the oven. For medium though, you may get better results finishing in the oven. 

 

As for letting them sit in the fridge after seasoning, I don't do it, I prefer to do as little as possible to the steak, and I'm not looking to tenderize it, so I don't bother, but try both and see which you prefer. 

 

In fact what has come out of that thread is that everyone has their own methods, so I'd suggest you start experimenting with the few different methods that make sense to you, and see if you can tell the differences, and which come out better (to you). That's really the only way for you to tell how to make the best steak for you (and your missus). 

 

My missus likes thin steaks, with no fat at all, well done, in a pan, with chili or cayenne. 

I like thick fatty rib-eyes, on the grill, rare to mid-rare, with S&P. 

Steak night is always a challenge. 

 

Oh and by the way some people don't like pepper on their steak, they feel the beef meat doesn't need it. And my father in law doesn't even add salt!! He gets exceptionally good quality steak (usually from the rump area as many French butchers cut their steaks), he cooks it in a medium-hot (far from screaming hot) pan for 30 seconds on each side, achieving a very "reasonable" amount of caramelization, adds a dab of butter on top, which will melt by the time the steak reaches the table, that's it. It's.... another experience!

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