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Pot pie egg wash question

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

I'm making a pot pie tonight for my family to put in the oven before I get home from work tomorrow.  To get a good result, I'm making sure the filling and crust are cold before assembling but had 2 thoughts:

 

1.  Would egg wash on the bottom crust before filling help keep the bottom from getting soggy?

 

2.   Could the pie be egg washed tonight and put in the fridge for 12-18 hours without any bacterial problems?  I would assume so if all is kept cold.

 

It's not the end of the world either way but just wondering if anyone has experience with this.

 

Thanks

post #2 of 16
Thread Starter 

Well, decided to skip the bottom crust wash and my kind but kitchen afraid family thinks they can tackle the wash tomorrow before the oven.

post #3 of 16

I fully blind bake all of my crusts for 45 minutes and apply the egg wash and bake another 10 minutes prior to filling and baking somemore.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #4 of 16

Is there such a time crunch that you cannot just prep everything tonite?

Then you just walk in and finish.

Easy peasy and for sure no "when in doubt throw it out".

 

I love pot pie.....

 

mimi

post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 

@flipflopgirl   It's more one of those things where while doing other stuff, I think "oh, there's not much for dinner tomorrow."  I look in the fridge, see the stuff for pot pie and decide on that.  Take a few minutes, make the crusts (make a few extra as long as I'm at it and freeze), make the filling.  Then remember that our window period is only 5-6pm.  I wouldn't get back until maybe 4.  One hour is enough if the oven is on but cutting it close.  I decide to assemble it all and then get to thinking about the integrity of the bottom crust (which when I assemble and bake same day is perfect) and the egg wash on top for looks.  

 

I got to think about other pastries that include buffering elements to keep the crust in good shape, like grated parmesan as the first element of tarts with fresh tomatoes to keep some of the water off.  Some sweet tarts with a thin painting of chocolate on the bottom.  It seemed like an egg yolk painting on the bottom before filling would work in theory but nothing came up on Google.  Then, some breads and pastries definitely have their egg wash sit for a long time before baking but I've never seen overnight in the 12-18 hours range.  If it's cold, it doesn't seem like it should be an issue, but hey, why not ask?

 

So, it's ordinary cooking on the surface but just gets me thinking about other facets and elements of pastry.

post #6 of 16
I can relate to that scenario! I make the stew and pot it without a bottom crust. Then make the pastry but refrigerate it unrolled. On the day of eating, I roll the pastry while the oven is heating and the pot of stew is coming to room temp, then top, wash, and bake. I've been known to "cheat" with store puff also. A top-crust pot pie isn't totally satisfying but quicker and easier on those nights where time is of the essence
post #7 of 16
I know for dessert pies or tarts you put cake crumbs at the bottom to prevent the soggyness, but for the savory I guess you can sprinkle Panko. Just give it a try.
post #8 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post

I can relate to that scenario! I make the stew and pot it without a bottom crust. Then make the pastry but refrigerate it unrolled. On the day of eating, I roll the pastry while the oven is heating and the pot of stew is coming to room temp, then top, wash, and bake. I've been known to "cheat" with store puff also. A top-crust pot pie isn't totally satisfying but quicker and easier on those nights where time is of the essence


I tried to make a single crust once and the peasants revolted.   :eek:

post #9 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lukelevi View Post

I know for dessert pies or tarts you put cake crumbs at the bottom to prevent the soggyness, but for the savory I guess you can sprinkle Panko. Just give it a try.


Panko seems plausible, throwing themselves on the watery grenade, as it were.

 

I think the beaten yolk with it's fatty barrier might work but when it's getting on 9pm and the sourdough still needs some tending, I said fuggedaboutit

post #10 of 16

Again.... I love pot pie .

:)

mimi

post #11 of 16
Thread Starter 

post #12 of 16
Nice.
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post

Nice.

 

Really nice.

Discuss.

 

mimi

post #14 of 16
Single crust is all I do for pot pie. The double crust is always gummy and I'm not a big fan of pie crust.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lukelevi View Post

I know for dessert pies or tarts you put cake crumbs at the bottom to prevent the soggyness, but for the savory I guess you can sprinkle Panko. Just give it a try.


With my method I never have a problem with soggyness using an egg wash on a fully prebaked crust.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #16 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatch View Post

Single crust is all I do for pot pie. The double crust is always gummy and I'm not a big fan of pie crust.


I was totally in the single crust camp until the family asked for double.  I was worried about the bottom crust.  When I started making them, I used Pyrex or aluminum, put it on a baking sheet and on the lowest level of the oven which is right above my heating element for the first half of cooking.  Also, I make sure the filling and crust are cold.  Bottom crust is always crisp and dry.

 

But I totally support your single crust also.  The chef gets some license when they are the one providing labor.  :)

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