or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Macaroon Disaster

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
I have recently moved to Colorado and am having the most awe full time with my macaroons. I'm starting to lose hope. The closest I've gotten is the purple macaroon below, but the foot is protruding. All of my other batches are turning out like the orange ones at the bottom. Is there something I need to do to account for altitude? I'm above 7000 feet. [IMG]
post #2 of 9

well!  I'd be unhappy with those too :)

 

What method are you using (french meringue or italian meringue)?  Are you using the same coloring as you did in your previously successful batches?  Have you changed everything else or are you using the same almond flour (brand), confectioners sugar, etc?  (We don't know where you moved from)  Something as simple as changing the brand of parchment can mess things up - it happened to me, and I've heard from other pastry chef friends that going from silpats to parchment has caused them problems too.

post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JCakes View Post

well!  I'd be unhappy with those too smile.gif

What method are you using (french meringue or italian meringue)?  Are you using the same coloring as you did in your previously successful batches?  Have you changed everything else or are you using the same almond flour (brand), confectioners sugar, etc?  (We don't know where you moved from)  Something as simple as changing the brand of parchment can mess things up - it happened to me, and I've heard from other pastry chef friends that going from silpats to parchment has caused them problems too.

Sorry I Moved from New Orleans. I've used all the same ingredients and I'm using the French method. I've never tried the Italian method but am looking into ordering Caster sugar to test it out.
post #4 of 9

I don't have any experience with baking at high altitudes; it could be that you need to experiment with how long you let the shells sit before baking.  I can't tell from the photo if all the shells are spreading and are misshapened, or if some are fine while others are not (the purple macs weren't in the post that I saw, just the orange ones)

post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 
Thank you! The shells are perfect, but sadly hollow and they are sliding off I'm wondering if the altitude is messing with the meringue. And Italian meringue is a hardier if I'm not mistaken.
post #6 of 9

I'd make a new batch and then time it for how long the shells sit.  Go for 5 mins, 8 mins, 12 mins, etc - keep all other things the same (parchment or silpat, oven; etc) and if you only have room to bake 3 pans at a time, do that (pipe some number of shells on each and then mark the paper with how long they've sat).  Italian meringue is different, to be sure; so I'd say to stay with the recipe you know has worked for you in the past and try to troubleshoot from there.  Another factor is the oven; this is definitely different :) from  your other one! It could be that you need a lower or higher temp.

post #7 of 9

@megroc this article will answer your question and solve your dilemma brilliantly as it pertains to Colorado high altitude baking with macarons.

 

http://www.lespetitsmacarons.com/HighAltitude.html

 

Keep using the French Method as the Italian Method has too much liquid in the final product. You will see in the article. 

HTH's :D

post #8 of 9

Being someone living in Colorado, I can probably help you out.

 

Possibly post your formula?

 

I am going to guess you are using fine sugar instead of granulated? The finer the sugar the more it is going to spread.

 

As far as letting the shells sit, mine take around 40 minutes to dry to where they actually have nice feet once baked. 

 

I would be happy share my recipe with you if it helps. However, i think success for macarons in 90% in the mixing method. I am tired of hearing the "lava" comparison.

 

I like to fold till the batter seems to flatten out as it comes of the spatula, that also helps them to flatten out and not get the little points i see on top of your shells. 

 
11348159_923508184400859_604031634_n.jpg?ig_cache_key=MTEyNDQxMzMzOTU5MjM3NjA2OQ%3D%3D.2
 
post #9 of 9


I have found this chart helpful for high altitudes. Credit to an old Williams-Sanoma book. Whisk those whites, girl.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Professional Pastry Chefs