or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Grilling (NOT smoking) Saint Louis ribs?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Grilling (NOT smoking) Saint Louis ribs?

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 

Saint Louis ribs are on sale here, and I've never made them. I've never smoked anything in my life and I'm not ready to start just yet. 

 

Is it possible to successfully grill those over direct or indirect heat (gas grill)? Anyone has a recipe or some pointers? 

post #2 of 29
You can use a rub and cover them in foil to grill them off direct heat for 2-3 hours, then sauce and carmelize over direct heat. I do ribs that way all the time. The foiled part can also be done in the oven if you prefer.
Edited by Midlife - 10/17/16 at 6:13pm
post #3 of 29
What midwife said. If you have a weber kettle, bank coals on one side and out the ribs on the other with vent above the ribs. 2 or 3 hours later, slather with sauce over the coals. If you want to start smoking... Throw a pice of hickory on the coals at the beginning of the cook.
post #4 of 29
Thread Starter 

Great, thanks to both of you!

 

So what temp am I looking for for the 2 to 3 hours of foil-steaming? I'm probably going to do that part in the oven.

post #5 of 29
I do it at 225-250°F.
post #6 of 29
Thread Starter 

Thanks!

post #7 of 29

Many folks prefer to peel off the membrane before cooking, it can be a bit troublesome but not really difficult.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
post #8 of 29

I don't remove the membrame...

Maybe I am unique, but I actually like to tear it of with my teeth when eating the grilled ribs :D

 

I grill them on an open grill and just keep moving them as I see fit (I will have an unlit section to move them to, when needs be).

No idea about temperature though, and I don't foil either.

 

I like a marinade with ketjap (sweet soy), chili, ginger and garlic and I keep basting while cooking.

I have also done sweet sticky ones (peach or apricot juice or jam, ketjap and a bit of chili). They are too sweet for me, but everyone else seemed to enjoy them.

Life is too short to drink bad wine
---Anonymus---

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad wine
---Anonymus---

Reply
post #9 of 29
I'm With@butzy on the membrane 👍
You've gotten the right advice here so I'll ask, why haven't you tried smoking? It's so easy to do, just soak some wood chips and place them somewhere inside the grill. Not sure if this works with a gas grill. I know it's overwhelming considering how much info is on the net about smoking but once you do it once it all makes sense. Then you'll be addicted and smoke everything.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #10 of 29
I can understand the appeal of the membrane but it's just too Neanderthal for me. I rationalize my qweezy nature by thinking that removal helps the smoke and rub to penetrate better.

I've smoked on a gas grill by putting woo'd on the heat diffuser. It works but certainly isn't ideal.
post #11 of 29
Oh, and sometimes I've even drizzled liquid smoke on the ribs when oven roasting/stemming and grill finishing.

FF... Who has ribs on sale; you have whetted my appetite!
post #12 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post

FF... Who has ribs on sale; you have whetted my appetite!


A local Whole Foods market: http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/sales-flyer/shermanoaks - never seen them on sale there before. The sale ends today though!

post #13 of 29
Thanks! I'll be there! Maybe I'll see you? I'll be the guy wearing the brown tee shirt with a pic of a Webber kettle and the saying "old guys rule".
post #14 of 29
Re smoking on a gas grill: When I was buying a gas grill for a built-in island, about 10 years ago, I had to pass on one from DCS due to size but it had a wood chip box built into it. The box slid in just above burner level. DCS (Fischer & Paykel) is a pretty high quality outfit so I'm thinking this can be viable though I've never tried a workaround where you just insert a separate chip box.
post #15 of 29

 

 

 

Sous vide ribs and finished on the grill. Melt in your mouth fall off the bone tender.

post #16 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post

I can understand the appeal of the membrane but it's just too Neanderthal for me. I rationalize my qweezy nature by thinking that removal helps the smoke and rub to penetrate better.

I've smoked on a gas grill by putting woo'd on the heat diffuser. It works but certainly isn't ideal.

Have you tried it? The way we make them the membrane gets crisp. It does not have the same texture as when raw.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #17 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

Have you tried it? The way we make them the membrane gets crisp. It does not have the same texture as when raw.

Yes, at a BBQ joint in Texas. It was crispy but got stuck between my teeth. I didn't like it but understand why others might. I don't like 7-layer dip either... But understand why everyone else likes it.
post #18 of 29

I've used this recipe with baby backs but he says it works well with St. Louis ribs as well.  They are surprisingly good and very easy. 

 

http://www.briansussman.com/crazy-stuff/my-world-famous-super-bowl-rib-recipe/

If you make a pizza you can eat for a day.  If you make two pizzas you can eat for a day.
Reply
If you make a pizza you can eat for a day.  If you make two pizzas you can eat for a day.
Reply
post #19 of 29
Anybody here heard of caja China (Chinese box) heard you can bbq in it, is it better then smoke??
post #20 of 29

It's essentially just an oven.

post #21 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piero View Post

Anybody here heard of caja China (Chinese box) heard you can bbq in it, is it better then smoke??

 

Its Cuban, but more of a Miami Cuban.

 

It helps keep the meat moist, good for pork.

post #22 of 29

Do yall prefer steaming to boiling?  I get pretty good results boiling the ribs first, and then you have a stock you can use for something else.

post #23 of 29

I never foil ribs and have done them on the weber many times. Indirect heat and I use a weber rib rack on the cool side. Keep the heat around 225 for 3-5 hours(depends on rib thickness), flip and mop every hour for 3 hours then every half hour until done. Mop with olive oil/cider vinegar to set the bark. Like bacon on a bone! Add smoking wood of choice every hour for 3 hours if you like smokey, otherwise for the first 2 hours.

 

Ribs are done when you grab them in the center of the slab and the ends bend down and the meat starts to pull apart in the center. That will be done so there is a little bit of a pull to get the meat off the bone. If you like falling apart cook a little longer.

post #24 of 29

I've done ribs a few different ways, only did them on my weber, indirect heat, one time. It turned out amazing, but it was exhausting to check on it every thirty minutes or so. I had trouble keeping my heat steady. Gas would be far better for this (this is why I only did it once. Too exhausting for my liking)

 

My biggest piece of advice is to find a liquor of some kind (I used black spiced rum), some kind of complementary juice (I used apple juice) and mix them 50/50 in a spray bottle. Every time you check your ribs, give em a bit of a spritzing. It adds a lot of flavor as well as keeps them moist.

 

Also, a leave in wireless thermometer (the kind that can possibly connect to your phone, or a remote readout of some kind) would also be amazing if you are using charcoal.

 

There are loads of videos on Youtube, try BBQ Pit Boys.. They often use the 3-2-1 method.

 

3 hours indirect heating, low and slow. Flip and/or rotate half way through to ensure even cooking.

2 hours wrapped in heavy duty aluminum foil, at the same temperature and still over indirect heat.

1 hour on indirect heat to finish, with maybe a bit of a higher heat at the end with some basting of your favorite sauce.

post #25 of 29

Another thing to try, place a small metal container inside the pit out of the way.  Fill half full with liquid smoke.  Leave in grill while cooking, closest to the hottest part, but not directly over flames.  Can be done in a standard oven, also.  The shorter the cook time, the wider the container needs to be for more evaporation.

 

It works.

post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raibeaux View Post
 

Another thing to try, place a small metal container inside the pit out of the way.  Fill half full with liquid smoke.  Leave in grill while cooking, closest to the hottest part, but not directly over flames.  Can be done in a standard oven, also.  The shorter the cook time, the wider the container needs to be for more evaporation.

 

It works.

I forgot about this.

 

I would omit the liquid smoke if using charcoal, and simply used some soaked wood chips. But that's just because I've had some bad experiences with liquid smoke (lighter fluid taste).

 

Always important to have a container of water in with your meat when smoking or grilling something low and slow, to keep in some moisture.

post #27 of 29
Thread Starter 

Ribs turned out great! 225F for 1h1/2, unfoiled, then sauced and grilled for 15mn. Served with potato salad and hard cider.

 

Thanks for all your help!!

 

post #28 of 29
Yay! Looks very yummy!
post #29 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post

Yay! Looks very yummy!

 

Thanks! :)

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Grilling (NOT smoking) Saint Louis ribs?