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How to cut up a tomato

post #1 of 40
Thread Starter 

So this is my weekly skills video (posted on Thursday)

 

 

I hope everyone that watches this video enjoys it.

Please comment below if there is anything you'd like to share.

I'm always looking for feedback so please let me know what you think.

post #2 of 40

I am really trying to help and am being picky but not in a snarky way I hope.  Back to ServSafe.  The coffee cups on your prep table, are they going to a table?  What was in that dirty skillet on the stove top?  All my classes started with a section on food safety. When I have done demonstrations and classes I try to follow that practice.  If I am being too picky let me know and I will stop my reply's.. 

post #3 of 40

Most people at home don't have a knife that will slice through the skin of a tomato.  

post #4 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimyra View Post
 

I am really trying to help and am being picky but not in a snarky way I hope.  Back to ServSafe.  The coffee cups on your prep table, are they going to a table?  What was in that dirty skillet on the stove top?  All my classes started with a section on food safety. When I have done demonstrations and classes I try to follow that practice.  If I am being too picky let me know and I will stop my reply's.. 

no its all good. the coffee cups are used on the line for portioning. (I make most my sauces in batches 2 times per week. Some get reheated in a coffee cup in the nuke. ) the pan on the stove is acutely for my Vichy carrots. I caramelize a cup of sugar and add water to it at the start of dinner each night. My deep fryer has be converted to water. So I drop my blanched carports in the water for heat the the Vichy pan for flavour. But I can be more aware of my surrounding and try to remove this stuff from the shot. I do need comments like yours to make better videos.

post #5 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kuan View Post
 

Most people at home don't have a knife that will slice through the skin of a tomato.  

why don't they? I wanted to start fixing my car myself I bought a socket set. Why do people neglect there kitchen equipment.

 

also on a side note lots of high end kitchen stuff is crap. I watch a good tool show on youtube where this guy takes stuff apart and show why witch tools are good or bad.

 

he took apart a 300 dollar kitchen aid hand mixer. (basicly 2 drills side by side) the kitchen aid was at least 10 years behind the tool world. 

post #6 of 40

Most people have inadequate knives because they're not aware of what it will do for them to have better gear. Nor that sharpening doesn't have to be complex or expensive although it can be as well. And there are people who just don't cook beyond subsistence feeding of themselves. 

 

They never learned to chop vegetables, or disassemble a whole chicken. They muddle through and think that's just how it has to be. 

 

Clearly you're a tool geek so it matters to you. And you cook. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #7 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by kuan View Post
 

Most people at home don't have a knife that will slice through the skin of a tomato.  

I don't mean to be contrarian or "stir" the proverbial soup, but how would one begin to verify an assertion like that? 

post #8 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by jake t buds View Post
 

I don't mean to be contrarian or "stir" the proverbial soup, but how would one begin to verify an assertion like that? 


Lol.  I"ll verify it anecdotally. After years of visiting the homes of family, friends and acquaintances, I can say that the vast majority don't' have sharp knives. I've convinced a few to buy better ones but not all by any means. That's not very scientific I know but when I'm expecting to find dull knives in a kitchen, I'm rarely disappointed. 

post #9 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatch View Post
 

Most people have inadequate knives because they're not aware of what it will do for them to have better gear. Nor that sharpening doesn't have to be complex or expensive although it can be as well. And there are people who just don't cook beyond subsistence feeding of themselves. 

 

They never learned to chop vegetables, or disassemble a whole chicken. They muddle through and think that's just how it has to be. 

 

Clearly you're a tool geek so it matters to you. And you cook. 

if your taking the time to watch a video on how to chop a tomato then you probably care about your food more then just muddling through it. Also this is the second video in my skills video linediting. In the first video we went over how to hone a knife.

post #10 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by InABox View Post
 

if your taking the time to watch a video on how to chop a tomato then you probably care about your food more then just muddling through it. 

I know a lot of people who watch food network daily and can't cook AT ALL

post #11 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefwriter View Post
 


Lol.  I"ll verify it anecdotally. After years of visiting the homes of family, friends and acquaintances, I can say that the vast majority don't' have sharp knives. I've convinced a few to buy better ones but not all by any means. That's not very scientific I know but when I'm expecting to find dull knives in a kitchen, I'm rarely disappointed. 

 

I totally agree, and these are family and friends who like to cook. Thanksgiving day: "Would you carve the turkey for us?" Sure, if you give me something better than a dinner knife.

post #12 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MillionsKnives View Post
 

I know a lot of people who watch food network daily and can't cook AT ALL

most people on food network can't cook. PBS is where it's at for quality cooking.

post #13 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefwriter View Post
 


Lol.  I"ll verify it anecdotally. After years of visiting the homes of family, friends and acquaintances, I can say that the vast majority don't' have sharp knives. I've convinced a few to buy better ones but not all by any means. That's not very scientific I know but when I'm expecting to find dull knives in a kitchen, I'm rarely disappointed. 


I have to agree with this and add my evidence to the study.  Roughly 80-90% of the time, when I use someone's knives, they are dangerously dull.

post #14 of 40

Anyway... knives and underwear are not something to share.  I bring a knife bag if I know I have to do work.

post #15 of 40
Of course on the other end of the spectrum there are those who seem to only care about their high end knives and how to keep them sharp more than actually preparing food.
post #16 of 40
Thread Starter 

you know this gives me an idea for a video

post #17 of 40

most folks I know have dull knives.  If I am going to their house for a meal,  I usually bring my kit( a 'knife bag' is a little pretentious for an old sailor) a small tool box with 2 or 3 paring/utility knives, a chef's knife or veg cleaver, and 3 or 4 diamond stones (6"x2") in several grits.  I share my knives, sharpen their's, help cook and clean up.  I do watch how my knives are used, make sure the cutting boards are used, and clean/double dry the blades when done.  I will admit that doing this has resulted in a sale or two, especially when they know I will be back to touch up an edge.

   all seriousness aside, if the need arose and mediums would fit, i'd lend scivvies.

Scott just a tired old sailor glad to be home from the sea
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Scott just a tired old sailor glad to be home from the sea
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post #18 of 40

The futzing around with the tomatoes was a distraction as well as a waste of time.

Wouldn't hurt to place the camera on the business side of the action either.

 

Like @Jimyra mentioned may sound picky but you asked for feedback.

 

mimi

 

Re good sharp knives and the availability of such in most of my relative's kitchens.

I have a sister in law who has a junk drawer full of "steak knives" both serrated and not.

No peeler either.

I made a pretty tasty dish of candied carrots .....pretty ugly after scraping but more than edible and not one bite left.

Family....love them all!

 

m.

post #19 of 40
Most of my friends have dull, shit knives. If I know that I'm helping out with a meal I will bring the appropriate knives.
post #20 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post
 

Wouldn't hurt to place the camera on the business side of the action either.

 

Ditto this. Your hand blocks the view. A staright on camera angle would probably be more informative.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by InABox View Post
 

In the first video we went over how to hone a knife.

 

In my experience, most people's knives are beyond the point were honing would accomplish much.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #21 of 40

My mother was visiting a while back and wanted to help in the kitchen. She asked me specifically which was the dullest knife, and proceeded to use it the entire stay for fear of cutting herself. Badly. She knew I keep my edges sharp, and was scared of using them. But this is coming from someone who cuts garlic over a pan with a paring knife as sharp as a common house key. 

 

I guess I'm split. Half the people I know have dull knives. The other half have blades sharp enough to cut through tomato skin. 

post #22 of 40

I've related this story more than once here on Cheftalk. My wife was heading to one of her folk dance parties, and was planning on taking a pineapple to cut up and share. She was running a bit late, I asked her if she wanted to cut up the pineapple before leaving.  She said no, she'd do it there.  Later that evening after she got home and was unloading stuff she says to me "Thank you for keeping our knives sharp."  Breaking down that pineapple at the friend's house was an ordeal for her, she is used to knives that can actually cut.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #23 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by kuan View Post

Most people at home don't have a knife that will slice through the skin of a tomato.  
I'll ageee..... at least to the extent that we've rented dozens of condos and air b&b units over the years and have never once found a decent knife in any of their kitchens. If any of the knives we've found in these places were ever capable of slicing a tomato that ability had long since faded. Probably a function of no maintenance and cost, but it's depressing.
post #24 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Midlife View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kuan View Post

Most people at home don't have a knife that will slice through the skin of a tomato.  
I'll ageee..... at least to the extent that we've rented dozens of condos and air b&b units over the years and have never once found a decent knife in any of their kitchens. If any of the knives we've found in these places were ever capable of slicing a tomato that ability had long since faded. Probably a function of no maintenance and cost, but it's depressing.

 

The beach place I lease every summer is fully furnished as well.

I spend the first 2 days packing up the kitchen (xcept the coffee maker) along with the linens.

Restock with stuff from home.

I wouldn't bother if it was only a week or two but.....

 

mimi

post #25 of 40
Last Xmas we shared a vacation rental with some friends, and the first thing I packed was my knife roll. Couple of chef's knives, a few paring knife, and a honing rod. Now I can cook in any kitchen, I thought. Only when we arrive the largest pot they had was 3 quart. For a rental unit that can house 3 whole families, that's a little skimpy. How do I boil water for pasta? 
post #26 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post
 
Last Xmas we shared a vacation rental with some friends, and the first thing I packed was my knife roll. Couple of chef's knives, a few paring knife, and a honing rod. Now I can cook in any kitchen, I thought. Only when we arrive the largest pot they had was 3 quart. For a rental unit that can house 3 whole families, that's a little skimpy. How do I boil water for pasta? 

 

IME?

The owner/real estate firms reason since you are on vacay you will be eating most meals at restaurants so they only stock what is needed to prepare breakfast and snacks.

My first summer at this rental (camper) I learned to do boiled shrimp in an electric skillet...it was just too hot to do it inside and I had plenty of electric outlets on the patio so why not?

Worked so good it became my go to operation lol.

This will be my third year at the same spot and will be setting up a simple outside kitchen.

Even with trees and the gulf breezes it just gets too darn hot to cook in a tin can lol.

 

mimi

 

No @ChefBillyB have not found my second home yet.

It looks like no one is living in Gma Van's old house and still praying the markets to go a bit higher before I rob a chunk for a down payment....

Hope I am not sitting on a bubble.....

 

m.

post #27 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kuan View Post
 

Most people at home don't have a knife that will slice through the skin of a tomato.  

well now there is no excuse

 

post #28 of 40
I totally got lost at the "I've never worked with a whetstone; I don't know how to use a whetstone" comment. smile.gif
post #29 of 40

The quickest way I know of to destroy a knife is with a bench grinder. Too fast and too hot. The second fastest way is with one of those sharpening things.

 

I once gave a bunch of wood chisels to my local hardware store to be sharpened. I could have done it myself but they were many and pretty beat up but they were good quality chisels. Guy at hardware store says they send them out. When I got them back they were worse than when I gave them to them. Burned, dull, uneven. Apparently the guy they sent them to does a great job on lawnmower blades though. 

 

Moral of the story is if you care about your knives send them out to a sharpening service or learn how to do it yourself with a whetstone.

post #30 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HalB View Post
 

The quickest way I know of to destroy a knife is with a bench grinder. Too fast and too hot. The second fastest way is with one of those sharpening things.

 

I once gave a bunch of wood chisels to my local hardware store to be sharpened. I could have done it myself but they were many and pretty beat up but they were good quality chisels. Guy at hardware store says they send them out. When I got them back they were worse than when I gave them to them. Burned, dull, uneven. Apparently the guy they sent them to does a great job on lawnmower blades though. 

 

Moral of the story is if you care about your knives send them out to a sharpening service or learn how to do it yourself with a whetstone.

so unfortunately I wasn't at home to show my bench grinder witch has a speed controll. You may also dip them in water as you go.

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