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Sous Vide & TV Chefs

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

I'm a home cook. I've done sous vide a bit and understand the process and theory behind it.  I watch a good number of TV Chef contests eg. Iron Chef, Beat Boby Flay, and other programs based around real chefs.  On a number of occations I've seen Chefs on shows where the allowed cooking time is fixed, like 20 minutes or 45 minutes and occationally I see some of these chefs put something (usually their protine) in an immersion bath and pull it out within the alloted time.  Come on, I've never Sous Vide anything, even a steak for less than 2 hours.  I'm not sure I can even do an egg for much less.  Are they really cooking Sous Vide or are they using a high temperature bath or what?  What are they doing?  Why waste time with that if it doesn't accomplish what Sous Vide does? 

 

Thanks for any information you can provide,

 

Bruce

post #2 of 12

A tender protein that is ready to cook and eat (think most steak, chops, chicken breast, etc) would easily cook within a 30-40 minute time window, assuming it wasn't too big. 

 

I also think that on shows like Iron Chef they only have to plate 1 of each, then they get extra time to make the judge's plates and finish the dishes. 

 

An egg should take no longer than 45 mins to an hour.

 

But basically any protein that you can cook, say, on a grill or in a saute pan can be sous vide in a relatively short amount of time as well.  

post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 

Okay, Thank you, I'll have to give it a try sometime.  It sure can't hurt.  I can always check internal temperture before grilling and something like a steak will definately go on the grill anyway so no harm, no fowl.:)

 

Thank you for your response.

post #4 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by -bc- View Post
 

Okay, Thank you, I'll have to give it a try sometime.  It sure can't hurt.  I can always check internal temperture before grilling and something like a steak will definately go on the grill anyway so no harm, no fowl.:)

 

Thank you for your response.

 

I don't understand your comment about checking the internal temperature...if you sous vide at a controlled temperature it will be the same internal temp as the water bath....

post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hi, Sorry if i wasn't clear.  I tend to forget that others aren't reading my thoughts. 

 

My comment refers to the the total time to cook a steak.  If 30-45 minutes is adiquit than the internal temperature will be the same as the water.  However, if the time is not adiquit than the internal temperature will not be there.  If in my test it isn't complete than I can still continue if I tape up the bag and keep it in.  That explains the "No Harm no Foul" comment or maybe I should say Fowl as its steak in the bag :)

post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Someday View Post
 

A tender protein that is ready to cook and eat (think most steak, chops, chicken breast, etc) would easily cook within a 30-40 minute time window, assuming it wasn't too big. 

 

I also think that on shows like Iron Chef they only have to plate 1 of each, then they get extra time to make the judge's plates and finish the dishes. 

 

An egg should take no longer than 45 mins to an hour.

 

But basically any protein that you can cook, say, on a grill or in a saute pan can be sous vide in a relatively short amount of time as well.  

I have to comment.

 

First remember it's a TV show created for your enjoyment. Time is irrelevant as the producers can edit anything they want.

What you may have seen as a protein going into a water bath for only 45 minutes could have actually been and hour and some but it was edited for your viewing pleasure.

 

Now on to Someday's comments about Sous Vide and timing.....

 

In another thread here on the Pro forum entitled "School me on Sous Vide: Zero to hero style..." you wrote the following:

 

1) You'll probably have to play around a bit with temperatures to find the one you like best. I do my steaks at 132F, which is a touch on the rare side of MR. But it works great for me and where I am. I do my chicken breast at 138F for 1.5 hours. Pork I generally do about 135F, Duck magret I do at 135 (2 hours), Lamb loin/rack at 134F. 

 

I realize this was and is your own experiences but now you have me wondering if the TV show kitchens turn their machine up higher to facilitate faster cooking, but wouldn't that defeat the purpose of Sous Vide in the first place?

post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefross View Post
 

I have to comment.

 

First remember it's a TV show created for your enjoyment. Time is irrelevant as the producers can edit anything they want.

What you may have seen as a protein going into a water bath for only 45 minutes could have actually been and hour and some but it was edited for your viewing pleasure.

 

Now on to Someday's comments about Sous Vide and timing.....

 

In another thread here on the Pro forum entitled "School me on Sous Vide: Zero to hero style..." you wrote the following:

 

1) You'll probably have to play around a bit with temperatures to find the one you like best. I do my steaks at 132F, which is a touch on the rare side of MR. But it works great for me and where I am. I do my chicken breast at 138F for 1.5 hours. Pork I generally do about 135F, Duck magret I do at 135 (2 hours), Lamb loin/rack at 134F. 

 

I realize this was and is your own experiences but now you have me wondering if the TV show kitchens turn their machine up higher to facilitate faster cooking, but wouldn't that defeat the purpose of Sous Vide in the first place?

 

I don't understand the point you are trying to make? Are you trying to call me out for contradicting myself or something? 

 

I only gave two times in your example above, which was for chicken breast and duck breast. The reason chicken has to cook for so long at 138 is to pasteurize it so that you get a 7-log10 reduction in bacteria. This really takes about 40 minutes to do that (once the core temp reaches 138). I pad this time out since it won't reduce quality for a chicken breast to sit in a batch for an hour and a half and to allow for the food to come up to core temp. Upping the temp (even by a few degrees) significantly reduces the pasteurization time, where it is quite possible to do a chicken breast at a slightly higher temp (with still amazing quality) and gaining the reduction in bacteria needed for safe consumption. 

 

The duck magret is timed at 2 hours because it significantly enhances tenderness of the magret breast, which can be a bit chewy if not prepared right. Another type of duck breast could be used. 

 

Something like a steak, lamb chop, pork chop, etc that don't need pasteurization can easily reach the core internal temp (say, 132) in the allotted time, provided the portions were not too large. 

 

And yes, turning your machines up too high will defeat the purpose. There are charts and times based on thickness of the protein, the water batch temp, etc that do make it possible to hit correct internal temp even if the batch is warmer than the target. This method usually involves probe thermometers, sealing tape, timers, etc. This is a more complicated method that probably doesn't warrant in depth discussion here....but it is also possible. 

post #8 of 12

"I don't understand the point you are trying to make? Are you trying to call me out for contradicting myself or something?"

 

Heavens no.......Using your examples. I'm just trying to understand how the TV Chef could utilize Sous Vide in the allotted TV time 

 

post #9 of 12
You certainly will not be getting 7D reduction of bacteria in 40 minutes @ 138 F! Not unless it's an extraordinarily thin piece. I think you need to double check your math.
"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
post #10 of 12
40 minutes once it hits core temp I believe is accurate, I'll double check later

EDIT: I did indeed check and the time for pasteurization is 40-45 minutes depending on fat content of the chicken. Keep in mind in my post above I stipulated about 40 minutes from the time the core hits temp, not 40 minutes total.
Edited by Someday - 4/24/17 at 3:32pm
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Someday View Post

40 minutes once it hits core temp I believe is accurate, I'll double check later

EDIT: I did indeed check and the time for pasteurization is 40-45 minutes depending on fat content of the chicken. Keep in mind in my post above I stipulated about 40 minutes from the time the core hits temp, not 40 minutes total.

 

That I will agree with.  I thought you meant 40 minutes total cooking time; that wouldn't get it done.  Generally if I'm not cooking with a needle probe in the product I'll err on the side of allowing a little extra time.  If you carefully prepare the product (mainly assuring the cut is at the correct thickness for the time involved) there should be no problem.

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phaedrus View Post
 

 

That I will agree with.  I thought you meant 40 minutes total cooking time; that wouldn't get it done.  Generally if I'm not cooking with a needle probe in the product I'll err on the side of allowing a little extra time.  If you carefully prepare the product (mainly assuring the cut is at the correct thickness for the time involved) there should be no problem.

 

:thumb:

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