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May 2017 Cooking Challenge: Fish! - Page 2

post #31 of 62
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeidiCooksSuppe View Post
 

As I looked for further information about Kecap Manis, it seems that this is very similar but the Indonesian version has various spices in addition to the sugars and soy sauce. 

 

What I have is Healthy Boy brand Sweet Soy and as I read the fine print, this is made using what it calls the "modern method."  It's only various sugars, water and soy sauce.  The lettering on the bottle is Chinese and Thai and in roman alphabet "Yan Wal Yun," which is the biggest sauce company in Thailand.  Since it was a friend visiting from Bangkok who suggested it, I'm guessing it's a staple of Bangkok kitchens.  She also helped me pick out a variety of curry pastes.  As she said, "You don't think we come home after work and mix the spices from scratch!"

 

Thanx for your question because now I know for my purposes to stick to the Thai (unseasoned) sweet soy because I use it without expecting it to add more than sweetness and soy umami.  Hmmph.  Ya learn somethin' new every day.

That's why I love these challenges, and cheftalk! Great hearing from people from so many different places. We have Healthy Boy brand here, I'll look for it.

post #32 of 62
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hank View Post
 

Great challenge.  We don't eat enough fish and have been talking about eating more.   It's not something I have cooked much so this will be fun for me.  

 

Grilled salmon with yogurt mint dill sauce served with green beans and blistered tomatoes.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hank View Post
 

Great challenge.  We don't eat enough fish and have been talking about eating more.   It's not something I have cooked much so this will be fun for me.  

 

Grilled salmon with yogurt mint dill sauce served with green beans and blistered tomatoes.  

 

Mint & dill are great with salmon - this sounds really good. I'm getting so many ideas from this challenge!

post #33 of 62

For this one, a question to anyone in New England, especially the greater Boston area: anyone know where I can get shad -- I mean the fish, not just the roe?

post #34 of 62

Sicilian Swordfish (Pesce spada alla Siciliana)

Well, I really did think I’d come up with an original recipe. I bought some beautiful swordfish steaks and I was thinking about how they would work so well with salty olives and capers, sweet raisins and creamy pine nuts in a garlicky tomato sauce. Having ‘invented', cooked and photographed the dish I Googled the combo of ingredients and discovered that the Italians got there first! 'Twas ever thus. Here is what I did:

 

 

 

The way I did it: 

 

Ingredients (serves 2)
2 swordfish steaks
1/2 medium onion, chopped
1 large clove of garlic, finely chopped
1 tbsp vegetable oil
1/2 tin chopped tomatoes
A large splash of white wine (optional)
6 pitted black olives
4 large pitted green queen olive, sliced into rings
1 heaped tbsp raisins
1 tbsp pine nuts
12-15 capers
Salt to taste
Parsley to sprinkle

Method

  • Place the raisins in a small bowl and add boiling water. If you intend to cook the dish in the oven, heat oven to 180C.
  • Heat the oil in a large frying pan and cook the chopped onions until softened. Add the chopped garlic and cook for a few more minutes, without browning.
  • Add the tomatoes and wine and cook over a medium-high heat until the tomatoes have reduced (5 mins). Drain the raisins and set aside.
  • You can now either cook on the hob or (as I did) finish the dish in the oven.
  • To cook in the frying pan, place the swordfish steaks in the pan first then add the other ingredients around them. Cook over a low heat for 20 minutes until the swordfish is cooked through.
  • If you are cooking in the oven, place the swordfish in a shallow ovenproof dish, surround by the tomato sauce and add the other ingredients. Cook covered loosely in foil for 20 mins.
  • Sprinkle with parsley and serve with boiled new potatoes or rice.

 

post #35 of 62

Just a simple marinated salmon seared off in a screaming hot cast iron skillet with bacon drippings and some steamed corn and a side salad.  

 

post #36 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by morning glory View Post
 

Sicilian Swordfish (Pesce spada alla Siciliana)

Well, I really did think I’d come up with an original recipe. I bought some beautiful swordfish steaks and I was thinking about how they would work so well with salty olives and capers, sweet raisins and creamy pine nuts in a garlicky tomato sauce. Having ‘invented', cooked and photographed the dish I Googled the combo of ingredients and discovered that the Italians got there first! 'Twas ever thus. Here is what I did:

 

 

 

The way I did it: 

 

Ingredients (serves 2)
2 swordfish steaks
1/2 medium onion, chopped
1 large clove of garlic, finely chopped
1 tbsp vegetable oil
1/2 tin chopped tomatoes
A large splash of white wine (optional)
6 pitted black olives
4 large pitted green queen olive, sliced into rings
1 heaped tbsp raisins
1 tbsp pine nuts
12-15 capers
Salt to taste
Parsley to sprinkle

Method

  • Place the raisins in a small bowl and add boiling water. If you intend to cook the dish in the oven, heat oven to 180C.
  • Heat the oil in a large frying pan and cook the chopped onions until softened. Add the chopped garlic and cook for a few more minutes, without browning.
  • Add the tomatoes and wine and cook over a medium-high heat until the tomatoes have reduced (5 mins). Drain the raisins and set aside.
  • You can now either cook on the hob or (as I did) finish the dish in the oven.
  • To cook in the frying pan, place the swordfish steaks in the pan first then add the other ingredients around them. Cook over a low heat for 20 minutes until the swordfish is cooked through.
  • If you are cooking in the oven, place the swordfish in a shallow ovenproof dish, surround by the tomato sauce and add the other ingredients. Cook covered loosely in foil for 20 mins.
  • Sprinkle with parsley and serve with boiled new potatoes or rice.

 

 

This looks absolutely amazing!

I can imagine the aroma through your house while cooking that!

Capers are an amazing ingredient with fish!

 

Did the raisins cancel out the over-empowerment of the olives? I imagine that would be the case?

 

All in all beautiful dish, very impressed!

post #37 of 62

Roasted coconut & Whiting soft shell Tacos with Salsa Verde and Baja Aioli.

 

What a beautiful day to journey into town and visit the local Fruit market and fish monger!

What was supposed to begin at 6am, became 10am due to how comfortable my bed was!

 

So Today I popped on my civi's, fired up my "Poison Ivy" green V8 and charged into town via the beautiful coastal road!

 

 

My first stop after the beautiful scenic drive was the local produce barn!:

 

Now, I was cooking for only myself, My loot was small, but enough to satisfy! and all super fresh and crisp!

 

Next stop was the seafood market! with a beautiful coastal view to get me there!

 

I had purchased my whiting fillets, all of my salad ingredients, all that was left, was a brief stop over at a supermarket to cover the smaller details. (Sour cream, Base aioli, spices and flours)

 

It was at-last, time to cook!

I think the process is fairly self-explainable through the process of pictures!

Happy to provide a recipe upon request!

 

Rolling the tortilla

Baja Aioli - 1 to 1 aioli & sour creme. squeeze of lime juice, chilli and cilantro!

Salsa Verde! - Lebanese cucumber, Spanish onion and Cilantro

Toasting the Tortilla!

Beautiful whiting fillets, butterflied and seasoned!

Cornflour, and coconut meal dredged whiting into the oil!

The Buffet style set-up! with Baja Aioli, roasted coconut flakes, Salsa Verde and fresh Cilantro!

The end product! (It didn't stay on the plate very long!)

 

 

 

And there you have it! My Entry into this months challenge!

Good luck everyone!

post #38 of 62

Do Anchovies count?  I swear these are swimming up stream . . . 

 

post #39 of 62
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by morning glory View Post
 

Sicilian Swordfish (Pesce spada alla Siciliana)

Well, I really did think I’d come up with an original recipe. I bought some beautiful swordfish steaks and I was thinking about how they would work so well with salty olives and capers, sweet raisins and creamy pine nuts in a garlicky tomato sauce. Having ‘invented', cooked and photographed the dish I Googled the combo of ingredients and discovered that the Italians got there first! 'Twas ever thus. Here is what I did:

 

 

Gorgeous! And the fish serving dish, too.   Incredible presentation!  Love this, and the way you came up with the recipe. I'll bet this would work with other fish, too. Beautiful photography, too.

post #40 of 62
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike9 View Post
 

Do Anchovies count?  I swear these are swimming up stream . . . 

 

Anchovies certainly do count! Pissaladiere? A very fine 'pizza' indeed!

post #41 of 62
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JVKolich View Post
 

Roasted coconut & Whiting soft shell Tacos with Salsa Verde and Baja Aioli.

The end product! (It didn't stay on the plate very long!)

Fish Tacos - beautiful! and making your own tortillas, too. Dredging in coconut flour's an interesting idea - I'll have to try that. Thank you for taking pictures throughout, it's worth it. Love the scenic shots, too  -- getting a glimpse of Australia is one of the reasons I watch My Kitchen Rules Aus.!

post #42 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by summer57 View Post
 

Fish Tacos - beautiful! and making your own tortillas, too. Dredging in coconut flour's an interesting idea - I'll have to try that. Thank you for taking pictures throughout, it's worth it. Love the scenic shots, too  -- getting a glimpse of Australia is one of the reasons I watch My Kitchen Rules Aus.!

The whole process was so easy, and the outcome was packed with flavour! I generally dislike working with dough and breads, but the tortilla's were actually enjoyable to make!

 

Don't take too much of Australian culture from MKR!, it's very glamorized and scripted! however it does have the essence of the typical Australian upper class personality traits!

I can't fault the food on the program though, great show to take inspiration from sometimes!

 

I wish I could make my food photo's look as beautiful and photogenic as @morning glory

I infact, wouldn't mind seeing a topic made on food photography in the future from people with the skill!

post #43 of 62
@morning glory inventing a dish that was already invented by he sicilians is only a testament to what a formidable cook you are. I will definitely have to try this dish out with tuna. Why do you soak the raisins?

The fish casserole dish is a nice touch.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #44 of 62

There also is a very similar dish in the cuisine of Mexico known as Vera Cruz style, it just has the addition of oregano and jalapenos. A wise mentor once told me that any time I got too full of myself and my creativity...someone else had already done the dish... LOL, so true.

 

I would eat your dish in a heartbeat, definitely a keeper. I love swordfish and that style of preparation...whoever invented it :~)...God I love the craft of cooking and never tire of it!

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #45 of 62

This is just plain jane fish cooking.  The photos are plain also.  The taste was very very good.  Yesterday was my sister in laws birthday so we gave her a choice of pizza or fish for supper.  She chose fish a good choice for this months challenge.

Catfish, hushpuppies, Parmesan her bed potatoes, slaw, and a light lemon cheese cake for desert.

The catfish are whole fish scored on each side.  Then they are marinated in buttermilk for a couple of hours then put in a grocery sack with cornmeal mix and shaken to coat.  The fish are fried stovetop in a cast iron skillet.  While the fish are cooking the excess buttermilk and cornmeal mix are combined with two eggs and a lot of minced onion.  The hushpuppies are then fried in the same peanut oil as the fish was.  Tartar sauce is mayo, onion, lemon, pickle, and a little Tabasco.  Slaw is cabbage with an oil, vinegar, sugar and s&p dressing.  The lemon cheese cake is a 50’s recipe with cream cheese, whipped evaporated milk, and of all things lemon gelatin.  My mother in law used to make it and it is light and perfect after a fried fish supper. Garnish the fish with lots of lemon and sliced red onion.

This is a very typical southern fish supper and is good.

 

 

post #46 of 62

Sorry about the double picture.  I had trouble on the uploads.

post #47 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by JVKolich View Post
 

Roasted coconut & Whiting soft shell Tacos with Salsa Verde and Baja Aioli.

 

 

 

 

 

The end product! (It didn't stay on the plate very long!)

 

And there you have it! My Entry into this months challenge!

Good luck everyone!

 

Very pretty indeed and I like the idea of the coconut. And what a lovely pictorial story from the sea to the plate!

post #48 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

@morning glory inventing a dish that was already invented by he sicilians is only a testament to what a formidable cook you are. I will definitely have to try this dish out with tuna. Why do you soak the raisins?

The fish casserole dish is a nice touch.


Thank you! I soaked the raisins in boiling water for twenty minutes to plump them up a bit. Perhaps its not necessary. I also added a splash of caper brine to the tomato sauce.


Edited by morning glory - 5/14/17 at 3:44am
post #49 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by summer57 View Post
 

Gorgeous! And the fish serving dish, too.   Incredible presentation!  Love this, and the way you came up with the recipe. I'll bet this would work with other fish, too. Beautiful photography, too.


Thank you. I think it would certainly work with any firm fleshed fish - monkfish perhaps. 

post #50 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheflayne View Post
 

There also is a very similar dish in the cuisine of Mexico known as Vera Cruz style, it just has the addition of oregano and jalapenos. A wise mentor once told me that any time I got too full of myself and my creativity...someone else had already done the dish... LOL, so true.

 

I would eat your dish in a heartbeat, definitely a keeper. I love swordfish and that style of preparation...whoever invented it :~)...God I love the craft of cooking and never tire of it!


It funny you should mention that. I make that dish and I make it with swordfish! This can't count as an entry because I made it last year but here is my version of Fish Vera Cruz. My twist is the use of oranges, very thinly sliced:

 

 

 

Recipe here: http://www.cookingbites.com/threads/pescado-a-la-veracruzana-fish-vera-cruz-style.7563/


Edited by morning glory - 5/13/17 at 1:20pm
post #51 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimyra View Post
 

This is just plain jane fish cooking.  The photos are plain also.  The taste was very very good.  Yesterday was my sister in laws birthday so we gave her a choice of pizza or fish for supper.  She chose fish a good choice for this months challenge.

Catfish, hushpuppies, Parmesan her bed potatoes, slaw, and a light lemon cheese cake for desert.

The catfish are whole fish scored on each side.  Then they are marinated in buttermilk for a couple of hours then put in a grocery sack with cornmeal mix and shaken to coat.  The fish are fried stovetop in a cast iron skillet.  While the fish are cooking the excess buttermilk and cornmeal mix are combined with two eggs and a lot of minced onion.  The hushpuppies are then fried in the same peanut oil as the fish was.  Tartar sauce is mayo, onion, lemon, pickle, and a little Tabasco.  Slaw is cabbage with an oil, vinegar, sugar and s&p dressing.  The lemon cheese cake is a 50’s recipe with cream cheese, whipped evaporated milk, and of all things lemon gelatin.  My mother in law used to make it and it is light and perfect after a fried fish supper. Garnish the fish with lots of lemon and sliced red onion.

This is a very typical southern fish supper and is good.

 

 

looks good.  I keep this recipe in mind when I have some catish to cook.  i am waiting for the weather to calm down here so the catfish will start biting.  our catfish should be about 3 pounds this year, just right to harvest.

Scott just a tired old sailor glad to be home from the sea
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Scott just a tired old sailor glad to be home from the sea
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post #52 of 62
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimyra View Post
 

Catfish, hushpuppies, Parmesan her bed potatoes, slaw, and a light lemon cheese cake for desert.

The catfish are whole fish scored on each side.  Then they are marinated in buttermilk for a couple of hours then put in a grocery sack with cornmeal mix and shaken to coat.  The fish are fried stovetop in a cast iron skillet.  While the fish are cooking the excess buttermilk and cornmeal mix are combined with two eggs and a lot of minced onion.  The hushpuppies are then fried in the same peanut oil as the fish was.  Tartar sauce is mayo, onion, lemon, pickle, and a little Tabasco.  Slaw is cabbage with an oil, vinegar, sugar and s&p dressing.  The lemon cheese cake is a 50’s recipe with cream cheese, whipped evaporated milk, and of all things lemon gelatin.  My mother in law used to make it and it is light and perfect after a fried fish supper. Garnish the fish with lots of lemon and sliced red onion.

This is a very typical southern fish supper and is good.

 

\

 

 

Looks good! Nice to see a complete menu that works well together. We don't have catfish here (except in my aquarium!).  I wondered if cod might also work for this method?  We can get tilapia, but it's farmed, so I'm a little cautious about it.

post #53 of 62

Cod makes great beer batter fried fish!

post #54 of 62

Many on you may look down on the dreaded canned tuna.  For years it has been a staple of the American diet. At one time the average consumption was 4 pounds for every American every year.  Lately sales have been declining.  My mother would not cook fresh fish because she said it stunk up her kitchen.  We did however have canned tuna and salmon.  With one can and some cracker and bread crumbs she could feed a family of five.  I used to really love salmon croquets with cream sauce and fresh peas.

I still eat canned tuna.  I make tuna salad with minced celery, chopped house made fourteen day pickles, mayo, and S&P.  Today I served it on a bed of spring greens and fresh spring vegetables.  I also like it on  a sandwich.   

 

post #55 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimyra View Post
 

Many on you may look down on the dreaded canned tuna. 

 

I double you'll find anyone on this forum that looks down on canned tuna.  I personally enjoy it as much as I enjoy fresh tuna.  In totally different applications, but I like it equally.  Looks great.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #56 of 62

My issue with canned tuna is I want to know the source of the fish. I will no longer eat fish form the Pacific due to rising levels of radioactive contaminants being found in the top predators like tuna, salmon...

 

If I could find a source of Atlantic canned tuna it would be great.

post #57 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryB View Post
 

My issue with canned tuna is I want to know the source of the fish. I will no longer eat fish form the Pacific due to rising levels of radioactive contaminants being found in the top predators like tuna, salmon...

 

If I could find a source of Atlantic canned tuna it would be great.

This is such a big problem nowadays.  If it's not an oil spill, it's a radiation plant washed into the sea.  Now the Great Barrier Reef is dead. Our oceans are in real trouble and we along with them.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #58 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryB View Post
 

My issue with canned tuna is I want to know the source of the fish. I will no longer eat fish form the Pacific due to rising levels of radioactive contaminants being found in the top predators like tuna, salmon...

 

If I could find a source of Atlantic canned tuna it would be great.

I don't remember where I heard/read it but, apparently, there are some brands that do inform you where their catch is from. You can either scan or enter a code or scan a QR code and their website will tell you the name of the boat and the location the fish was caught. Unfortunately, I don't remember the details.

post #59 of 62

Lot's of great dishes here!

 

At one point I was hired to teach Lamaze for a birthing center.

My first class always touched on nutrition and I stressed the dangers of mercury in tuna.

Advised my moms re the tuna and mercury connection and to try and keep their consumption to a minimum (at that time I think it was once a week).

That was over 25 years ago....now it is not only mercury but plastics and radiation levels and who knows what else.

Of course the fishing industry lobbyists stress that everything is safe if it falls below the "accepted" level.

Crazy.

 

I have to admit I also love a tuna salad.

In fact that is what was on the menu last nite lol.

Mine didn't look as yummy as @Jimyra's tho!

 

Carry on ;-)

 

mimi

post #60 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Misschief View Post
 

I don't remember where I heard/read it but, apparently, there are some brands that do inform you where their catch is from. You can either scan or enter a code or scan a QR code and their website will tell you the name of the boat and the location the fish was caught. Unfortunately, I don't remember the details.

Found it! It was a Globe & Mail article that can be found here: https://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/industry-news/marketing/clover-leaf-site-will-let-consumers-track-the-source-of-their-fish/article32221548/

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