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Determining kitchen equipment from a menu

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

My partner and I have a few years of experience owning and running a restaurant, but we both bought existing restaurants.  Neither of us have started from scratch.

 

We have a menu, and I want to know what are some "rules of thumb" or guidelines for determining the equipment necessary. Right now the size of the range and the size of the fryers, as our menu does not require an oven.

 

I have been researching online and I saw the general output of a fryer is 1.5 to 2 times the weight of the oil in food per hour. 

 

As for the range, do you try to calculate the average time to cook a dish and go from there?

post #2 of 7

Rules of thumb depend on the menu. Others might be able to help more if we knew what it was. 

Generally speaking, the guidelines are somewhat obvious. If no pizza, then no pizza oven. If all fried foods, then multiple fryers. 

But this also depends on how many seats, take out or eat in, etc. 
You don't need an oven. Well, maybe not now but will your menu ever change? you might need one when it does. How soon might that be? 

Anyway, a bit more info would be great.

post #3 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by User1973 View Post
 

As for the range, do you try to calculate the average time to cook a dish and go from there?

 

#seats in dining room, #covers per day, %menu from range during service, %menu from range during prep, %range prep being done during service, #kitchen staff, etc. etc. etc.

 

Are you confident that saute won't need an oven? Are you confident that grill won't need an oven?

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #4 of 7

If you look up the specs on a fryer it will tell you how many pounds per hour of fries it will produce.

 

But, big BUT, never buy a fryer to spec.  You'll have to clean it more often, change and add oil, you will have downtime during the rush because the oil is not reheating fast enough.

post #5 of 7
In my humble opinion, a menu is a compromise between the customer's wishes and the infrastructure of the kitchen.

as people (customers) are fickle, and demands and fads/crazes change, so too will your menu.

So, be flexible. Ovens are handy, and even if you don't use them now, they can be used as plate warmers/plate storage.

I hate fryers, messy, oily, requireing a lot of maintain ence, and every kitchen has at least one story of some bad burn while cleaning or straining. If you have two fryers on the line, get yoursellf a filtering unit that is hooked up to the fryers permanently. Upfront costs are a bit higher, but the payoff comes back everytime you strain, and the more you strain, the longer your oil lasts.

Modt, if not all equipment can be changed out in a half day or less. Your infrastructure (ventilaton hood, plumbing, etc) will require a lot more money AND time to change.

Hope this gives you dome ideas.....
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #6 of 7

Why don't you post your menu and let us make suggestions for equipment.  Let us know projections of number of portions served per day.

post #7 of 7

Me thinks they were another one post and goner.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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