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How much should a line cook be paid? - Page 3

post #61 of 80

What they do is dress skimpy, smile, and serve drinks.  Can't knock a girl for using her assets.  Just one level below a stripper and 2 levels between a you know what but they probably make more in one hour than a line cook makes in a shift.  Not sure who the sucker is??????

post #62 of 80
I hate these yearly BOH vs FOH marathons....tried to stay above it all but now that I have gone from overpaid trash to hooker I gotta step in for all of the members for whom tips make up most of their take home pay.

Most of y'all don't know anything about me so here it is in a nutshell.
Age 18 was "discovered" by my mentor while bartending at DFW Airport.
He saw something in me that oh so suave Persian man and took me on to mentor.
His wife taught me how to dress and apply makeup and to walk in heels.
I learned the hospitality industry top to bottom soup to nuts.
Then I proceeded to break his heart when upon graduation I chose the medical field over having the world at my feet ( his words not mine).

I went on to deliver babies for almost 30 years but never forgot a thing they taught me.
Stayed in the loop and picked up jobs here and there.
Like a utility player on a baseball team there was seldom a slot I couldn't slide into ( particularly bartending and catering) I always insisted on top dollar ( an average year I claimed around 100K for income tax between the FT and odd jobs).

Keep in mind when looking for a job....
The real money is in the upper crust hotels, country clubs and exclusive restaurants that pour ages old whiskey in a humidor room.
Having a nice pair of......legs will take you far I will admit....but bimbo is not in my CV.

So knowing all of that why would you ever want to work for barely enuf money to survive much less buy a new car every year... or own a home and start a family.
Altho there are a few Chefs on CT who have been able to do so....
@Pete and @ChefBillyB and a few others come to mind but most of you will have to throw in the towel when you realize 12 bucks an hour will just not cut it.
No matter how much booze you are allowed to consume while on the clock.

mimi

OBTW.... Check out the pix of some guy mooning his female co worker in the "woman in the kitchen" thread.
It is the opposite of what being an adult is all about....and totally tasteless as well.

m
post #63 of 80

FFG I figured we would hear from you after the last few posts.  The restaurants I have worked in have not had the friction between the front and back of house.  They were well structured with defined sets of responsibilities and staffed with adults.  This is going downhill from a poor start.  I don't see how anyone can work a shift in high heels,  I have trouble with my berks.

post #64 of 80
You haven't lived until you have served a couple thousand dollars worth of booze to a group of high rollers sitting at a living room couch height table.
Hefner was a genius with his bend from knees and serve from the side service motion.
Takes awhile to get down but if done right nothing valuable shows lol.

mimi

I have worked many different venues but was never a bunny ..... just to set things straight lol.

m.
post #65 of 80
Thread Starter 

I never said I was an adult.

 

I have a disclaimer in my profile 'I do not have a gentle heart'

 

I took pictures today at the disgusting, revolting kitchen left behind by the owners. but I'm too tired to post them. My kitchen closes at 9:00. I didn't get out of there until 11:30 last night.

 

My typical day coming in to work: Dirty dishes piled up. Inventory to be organized and put away in its place. Empty boxes left laying everywhere and need to be broken down. The flat top and the floor was a greasy mess. I wont cook for people on a filthy grill. It took several passes with oil and brick to clean it like new again.

 

No prep done the night before. I had no tomato, no slaw. The expensive leaf lettuce was turning yellow and needed be tossed out and replaced. They were supposed to pull chicken, but left them in the warmer overnight. I had to throw away 8 rotisserie chickens. I was running around all night trying to clean, cook and organize the kitchen instead of working a normal shift.

 

The buns for the sandwiches were still frozen. I had to rinse and portion shrimp and calamari that was left in containers the night before. It was wing night and luckily I had prepped for this over the weekend, but not everyone orders wings on wing night. I had a lot of pulled pork (to pull and prepare) and hamburgers to fire. Someone left taco sauce from Taco Tuesday in squeeze bottles unmarked, which could be mistaken for BBQ sauce.

 

The servers don't mark the tickets with separate orders for the same table. Not all tickets are going to be fired on the line depending on what it is when one person is working the kitchen. I had one of the servers help me keep up with the dishwashing duties. The server helped wash dishes, but put all our knives through the dishwasher.  The lazy servers didn't bother to wrap the silverware. They left it in the pass.

 

I'm not paid enough for what I have to do everyday. You have no idea the things i have to do to make this kitchen clean and organized properly and it makes my job ten times harder than it has to be.


Edited by BloodyMary - 6/16/17 at 9:49am
post #66 of 80
Thread Starter 

BEFORE:

 

 

 

AFTER:

 

post #67 of 80
I agree you are in a nitemare situation.
I also agree no amt of money nor perks would be enuf to clean up after owners who are hell bent to self destruct .
You sound smart and hard working and are way above the situation you currently find yourself in.
Why not polish up your CV and carpet bomb every place you can think of.
Your dream jobs.
Travel if needs be.
Even if you have to drag a family along lol.
Blow that popcicle stand!

mimi

OMG....I would have to slit my wrists if that is what I walked into every day.

m.
post #68 of 80
i agree, get out asap
post #69 of 80
Hi bloody mary,

I dunno.... the pictures show a dishpit, yes there is stuff thst needs to be cleaned. Sink, wall, and floor appear to be fairly clean. I Don't see any issues here.

In your posts you describe regular duties like putting inventory away, portioning product, etc. In other words, duties thst are typical and expected for your position--this is what you are being paid to do. I don't see any issues here either.

What are your expectations of the owners?
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
post #70 of 80

All the kitchens I've worked in have a swinging door. The door swings both ways, if it swings in don't Bitch you get paid by the hour. If it swings out, good luck I hope things are better down the road....

post #71 of 80

I see one cart full of dirtied cooking equipment, and don't even see any food particles on anything--they look rinsed.

Nor do I  see any dishes, plates, flatware, glasses, etc.

 

In the place I worked for  years, cleaning the cook line and baking stuff was my responsibility. In fact i insisted upon it, unless I didn't have time and needed some stuff back in service like.... NOW.

My general policy was, I dirtied it, so I washed it. And with that attitude in hand, I got plenty of help offers. I'd call that pic situation normal--probably cuz Ive seen way, way worse--certainly not disgusting. And I doubt any health official would either-- its all just waiting to be run thru sanitation.

post #72 of 80
I would just like to put in a word for the owners here. I do not know every detail of your situation, so I can tell you what you want to hear or what you need to hear. Man, you have got to slow down. Have you sat down with the owners? Is there a chef? Who is responsible for that kitchen? We are here for you to vent to, but nothing will change without action. I see this from your point of view, and I get frustrated too. However, take a minute to look at it from the owners view. Most businesses owners I know work 80-100 hours per WEEK. There is a whole lot that goes on behind closed doors. Running a business takes more than just turning the open sign on and off. If I were an owner who had just worked 16+ hours, you bet your butt I would expect my paid employee to do the dishes, that is why I pay them. My point is, stop being a victim. Address the problem in a professional manner and if you don't come to a solution then leave. Don't continue to be unhappy for no reason.
post #73 of 80
This one pix is NBD I agree.
But to walk in and have to bring the kitchen to a normal starting point and toss out product that was needed for that day's menu EVERY DAY I would be past weary.
Then have to send someone out to source whatever has to be replaced because the owners party friends either ate it or ate some of it and left the rest out to rot.

We all know those owners.....so when we finish the list we will have to pay out of our own pocket and pray they "remember to pay us back" because those sort of owners are too suspicious to leave any sort of petty cash laying around.
Right?

mimi
post #74 of 80
Thread Starter 

I cleaned my way around that mess I walked into in the dish pit.

 

Before I took that photo, I already pulled the mats, swept, mopped and took out the garbage.

 

I talked to the owner and she will start having a dishwasher everyday now to help out, but he is not going to be there before my shift starts.

 

Here is another set of pics of things I have to do before my shift even starts so that my shift goes easy.

 

In this photo I already made one pass with oil and brick. I clean this flat top grill twice a day. Once before and once after my shift because no one but me and the lead cook will do it.

 

BEFORE: 

 

 

AFTER:

 

post #75 of 80

I believe that every employee in a labor-intensive industry believes that they should be paid more. Can't blame them. Citizens in the labor sector tend to be under- or uneducated. Rare is the instance when one comes upon another who has been Ivy League educated but is cleaning hotel rooms, mixing cement in summertime Texas, or trimming the fat off of 50lbs of oxtails, while tending to tickets and keeping the menu items available.

 

When one sits to eat in a restaurant, one has certain expectations, the primary being that the food will be satisfactory, at the LEAST.

 

The service offered in a restaurant is, without a doubt, of high importance, but if we were to question the minutae of carnal desire, when was the last time you went out to spend your hard-earned disposable income for service? Have you ever spent time trying to decide where to go get served? When was the last time you said to your significant other, "Where do you want to go get served?" Probably never. You more than likely asked where to go to eat, where the service was great.

 

What is a restaurant? At it's basest measure, it's a place to go eat. Agreed? If a restaurant is a destination (at it's basest definition) whose primary objective is to provide anything other than food, please feel free to let us know.

 

What do people do at restaurants? They EAT. What do they eat? FOOD. Where does the food come from? The kitchen. Who's in the kitchen? COOKS.

 

When a major legal case is won or lost, is it the paralegal who gets the glory or the derision? When a song wins a Grammy, is it the mixing engineer who is lauded among the common fans?

 

In my opinion, those who produce the physical product or service deserve more than those who hand it over. This is not to say that servers are undeserving...some human beings are absolutely pieces of sh&t, and to have to deal with some humans, face-to-face, day after day, is a noble accomplishment in and of itself, but in the end, they bring to the customer that which the customer entered to the building for in the first place...

post #76 of 80

Some owners get tired of employees complaining about too much work for too little pay when they withdraw another weeks wages from their retirement fund.

post #77 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimyra View Post
 

Some owners get tired of employees complaining about too much work for too little pay when they withdraw another weeks wages from their retirement fund.

 

No one ever said owning a restaurant was easy...there is a reason why a huge percentage of restaurants fail within a few years of opening. Just because the business is tough and the margins are small, does not obviate the need to pay your employees a livable wage. Period. A decision was made by whomever opened the business to do so, and that, in my opinion, comes with responsibilities to your employees. 

 

The same enmity that you are projecting towards employees could easily be pointed right back at the owners. Hell, at least the owner HAS a retirement fund. I haven't been able to AFFORD one yet.....

post #78 of 80
Okay, i do agree the state of that grill is unacceptable. If I clocked in and found that, id be pretty ticked off myself. The grill's to be cleaned and blocked after every shift so far as im concerned, and several times during as load permits. And since its tough sweaty work, all cooks should share it equally.
post #79 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meezenplaz View Post

Okay, i do agree the state of that grill is unacceptable. If I clocked in and found that, id be pretty ticked off myself. The grill's to be cleaned and blocked after every shift so far as im concerned, and several times during as load permits. And since its tough sweaty work, all cooks should share it equally.

 

 

Meez...I'm with you. In fact, if it were me, I would wait until the evening shift guys come in and threaten their existence. This is laziness pure and simple.

BloodyMary has a point here. If this is one example, I'm sure there are others.

 

That being said, what I don't understand is why the OP is venting to us instead of the parties involved.

No amount of money is going to take care of laziness and poor performance.

post #80 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Someday View Post
 

 

No one ever said owning a restaurant was easy...there is a reason why a huge percentage of restaurants fail within a few years of opening. Just because the business is tough and the margins are small, does not obviate the need to pay your employees a livable wage. Period. A decision was made by whomever opened the business to do so, and that, in my opinion, comes with responsibilities to your employees. 

 

The same enmity that you are projecting towards employees could easily be pointed right back at the owners. Hell, at least the owner HAS a retirement fund. I haven't been able to AFFORD one yet.....
 

What is a livable wage?  Does it include cell phone, cable TV, smart phone, and many other things?  The OP has a house on the lake what is the cost of an apartment in town?  What minimum wage precludes the ability to open a business and provide employment at all?  I agree wages are two low but I feel the "owners" are not being represented here.  A lot of owners work longer hours for less money than the employees.

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