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post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
Well heres the deal....there are no real chefs where i live ...so its kinda hard for me to go out and interview one....and i cant copy someone elses inteview...
post #2 of 5
Tell us the rest of the story...you mean you need to interview a chef for school? You have no restaurants in your area? You don't have to limit yourself to just your town, unless your assignment calls for that. Also maybe if you try calling a restaurant you can arrange a phone interview with someone. What about a chef at your school? Can you do that?
Maybe I'm totally missing your point but with the information you gave, I had to assume some things.
post #3 of 5
He's right. I did a yahoomaps search for Corning, California. Then I did a restaurant search. :D Boy, you DO live in the boonies! :)

post #4 of 5
not many restaurants but you do have great olives in your part of the world! we always made the requisite Olive Pit stop when driving from WA to CA! :lol
post #5 of 5
1.) What Specifically is your job? Kitchen Manager for a local chain of restaurants ( http://sidneysrestaurant.com )

2.) Describe your average daily routine. In at 6am. Check the manager's log for any communications from other managers pertinent to my day. Check my station and make a list of what needs to be done to prepare it for the day. Place orders for food with purveyors. Check in incoming food deliveries (this involves checking what was delivered against the invoice and our order forms, plus checking perishables for quality). Help put deliveries away and organize storage areas. Work on my prep list. Help the breakfast cook if he needs help. Work my station from 11:00am until the lunch rush is over. Re-stock my station and finish any prep not done before lunch. Then, if all goes well, go home at 4pm and rest my aching back and feet.

3.) Why did you choose this career? It makes me happy and I get paid for it.

4.) What is the best advice you could give someone about your job? Learn how to deal with stress in a healthy way.

5.) If you could go back and change anything about your career, what would it be and why? I would have gone to culinary school earlier. I would be further along the career ladder at a younger age if I had.

6.) What do you like least about your career? See aching feet and back above.

7.) What benefits besides an income does your career offer? Depending on where you work, health, medical, dental, optical and 401K (or any combination of the above, sometimes none of them).

8.) What type of person do employers look for in this profession today? I can only tell you what I look for: Passion, good work ethic, a desire to learn and high standards regarding quality.

9.) What are possible related occupations? Food consulting, food writing, food styling, food sales, teaching, research and development...

10.) What is the best avenue toward an entry-level position? For some it's on-the-job training only, for some it's culinary school or an apprenticeship; sometimes it's a combination. The answer is different for each person depending on their goals, resources, etc.

11.) Who or what inspired you most to become a chef? When I was a kid, I always used to spend a lot of time with my Mom when she was cooking, so I've always felt more comfortable in a kitchen than anywhere else. Also, she's a very good cook, so that's been an inspiration as well.

12.) Are you allowed any creativity when it comes to cooking? In most places I've worked, yes. In my current job, no.

13.) When did you first become interested in this field? At first, it was just a way to make money. I didn't realize it was what I wanted to do as a career until about 8-9 years ago.

14.) How many hours a week do you work? Around 50.

15.) What is your favorite food to eat/cook? Classical French. Aside from liking the taste of many of these preparations, I like the history and tradition behind it all.
Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!
Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!
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