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Pasta Dough Techniques

Poll Results: How do you prepare pasta dough

 
  • 72% (16)
    By hand
  • 9% (2)
    Mixer
  • 9% (2)
    Robo Coupe
  • 9% (2)
    Purchase all my pasta.
22 Total Votes  
post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
Would be interested in hearing others ideas on preparing pasta dough. I enjoy making it by hand when I am at home but in the kitchen I always used a mixer. I have seen some use a robo coupe but this seems like a harsh method of preparing the dough.

I have found that using a particular brand of flour that I used in Italy yielded the best results which was called "Double 00". I was able to locate a resource for it hear in Chicago which was I was suprised about.

Would love to get some discussion going on different preparations and ideas about pasta dough.
Thanks,

Nicko 
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Thanks,

Nicko 
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post #2 of 21
Nicko,
"Doppio 0" (Double 0) is the italian name of the most refined, totally bran-free wheat flour. Although it usually refers to soft wheat flour, also a "Double 0" durum semolina exists, which is the only one that can be used for the industrial production of dry Pasta according to the Italian law.
"Doppio 0" soft wheat flour is the flour we generally use at home for making both fresh Pasta and cake doughs, and I agree with you that it yields the best results.
Since I make pasta dough only at home and not for professional purpose, I always make it by hand. I also roll it up by hand with my grandma's old king-size rolling pin...but I must admit that this is due to the fact that I'm totally clumsy with the pasta machine and have never learnt how to use it properly :D

Pongi
post #3 of 21

Mixer

I have worked with scratch pasta so much at home, that my 5 and 7-year old can mix it own their own. After mixing, my 5-year old rolls it through the Imperia and the 7-year old does the cutting. Last week they produced thier own ravioli. On Monday, for my pre-K and Kindergarten classes, we will be making tri-colored pasta cut into Fettucine.
I swear by my trusty stand mixer and agree that processing the mix sounds harsh, although I have seen it mentioned often.

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post #4 of 21
:eek: AAARGHHH :eek:

Are you saying that your 5 yr old can use the Imperia while I CAN'T?

:blush: What a shame :blush:

Can I take some lessons from you?

Pongi
post #5 of 21

pasta dough

i swear by my imperia to cut and roll all of my pastas and even though you thought that the robocoup seemed harsh for such a tender dough, i mix all of mine in my food processor on a pulse. as long as you're gradual in adding water, it doesn't give your dough a beating.
post #6 of 21
Pongi,
I'm sorry. I will check her social calendar to see if she can make a trip give lessons. ;)
There is (was) a video put out by the folks at Atlas Pasta Makers (similair to the Imperia) on the "how-tos" of pasta making. Might check eBay.
Good luck.

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post #7 of 21
There is a deli near my house that sells "Fancy Durum" flour that I use in equal measure with APF. This produces a very stiff dough that I am certain would burn out my KA motor in a heart beat.
Iv've never made pasta with soft wheat (cake) flour because I always thought you needed more gluten. What have I been missing all these years?
To answer the original question, By Hand. There is something theraputic about kneading dough, whether it is bread or pasta.

Jock
post #8 of 21
I have made pasta by hand and run it through the Atlas. I also made noodles with my grandmother many, many years ago- by hand. My mom passed down my grandmother's large wooden kneading board to me. My grandmother always called her noodle board- never her bread board. She used bread flour for noodles, I'm sure- but I recall a spoonful or two of cake flour, unless I'm remembering wrong. Come to think of it, I also have her rolling pin she used to roll dough out.

I eat pasta rarely nowadays, but when I do, I like De Cecco.
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post #9 of 21
Thread Starter 
Pongi,

Thanks for helping me get the term right. "Doppio 0" soft wheat flour is the what I prefer to use but sometimes it is not available at the local shop I go to here in Chicago. Is there another flour that you would recommend that is comprible to the Doppio 0?
Thanks,

Nicko 
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Thanks,

Nicko 
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post #10 of 21
Great topic!

I recently came across a recipe that called for a small amount of vinegar to be added to the mixture. I imagine it tenderizes the product. Has anyone ever had any experience with this? Is this ever done in Italy?
post #11 of 21
I'm a hand guy.

Like bread dough,I just love the feeling in my hands.

Most times at work I don't make pasta as the volume is to high to justify the time involved.Ever try to make cavitelli for 300 ;) ?
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post #12 of 21
Anyone remember Papa? Per his recommendation I get my pasta mail order from The Flying Noodle. Tastes great!

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post #13 of 21

pasta dough

Anneke,
I haven't heard of vinegar in pasta dough but the theory seems logical. I'm planning on making fettucine tonight at home and would be willing to try the idea if I had more specifics. I'm wondering about quantities and the use of salt... Let me know if you have any more thoughts.
post #14 of 21
Hathead,

Here's where I read about it: http://b-simon.ifrance.com/b-simon/nouilles.htm
post #15 of 21
I find making pasta about as therapeutic as making bread...which is very. I especially like to make gnocchi.
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post #16 of 21
Just a few weeks ago I found Doppio 0 flour. Now I'll have no excuse not to make pasta. Ok so I cheat a little and use the KitchenAid.

Pongi is there any word of advice you could share? It's been over a year since I've made fresh pasta...
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post #17 of 21
Anneke-
I have never put vinegar in my pasta dough, but I have put lemon juice in my streudel dough. The acidity is supposed to help the gluten develop a little more.
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post #18 of 21

By hand?

I generally mix the pasta dough by hand for home use. I am another vote for the therapeutic value. However, for hands on classes I use the processor regularly. Most home cooks don't want to spend the time. We have both hand rollers and kitchen aid attachments. I think they work equally well. We generally roll it out and make raviolis or something similar. I think it turns out very tender. I have never used vinegar, but have added acidic things to color the pasta like tomato paste.

I do have a question. Has anyone been able to make a red pasta dough that does not turn orange when cooked? Every combination I have come up with looks red when raw, but cooks to an orange color.

Thanks! Dickie
post #19 of 21
Peachcreek, I would have thought the acid would tenderize the dough by inhibiting gluten development much like adding vinegar or lemon juice to a pie crust dough. I have never done it but then this thread is full of surprises for me, contradicting all my notions of pasta making.

Jock
post #20 of 21
I don't think that a high gluten content is necessary to get a good pasta dough..."Doppio O" is the flour with the lowest gluten content, and it's considered the best for making pasta in Italy.
As for vinegar, I've never heard about it as Italian homecooks don't use it, so can't say if it makes sense or not.

Pongi
post #21 of 21
Thread Starter 
I have never heard of putting acid in pasta either unless it is a flavored sort in which case the acid product is often cooked. Does anyone know if King Arthur Flours makes a product comprable to Doppio 0?
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
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Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
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