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cookware

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I want to purchase some new cookware. How does all clad and calphalon compare to wolfgang puk or cooks essential?
Thanks
post #2 of 15
I don't have any experience with Wolfgang Puck or Cook's Essential, but I like All-Clad a lot more than Calphalon. We have a couple of Calphalon pieces we never use anymore after going to All-Clad. It seems to work better for us, it cleans up reasonably well, and there's no worry regarding the anodized surface.

Mike
post #3 of 15
Welcome to Cheftalk!

When you are shopping for pots and pans, there are a few different factors that you might wish to consider:

- price
- heat conductivity
- weight
- uses
- durability of handles
- warranty

In terms of conductivity, Aluminium is excellent, copper is even better but more expensive (such as Mauviel).

You will get a better results from a pan that has a heat-conducting metal not only sandwiched on the bottom, but goes all the way to the sides as well. That's the appeal of All-Clad.

All-Clad is stainless steal with aluminium core going up the sides. But it is very expensive.

Calphalon is usually anodized aluminium, which means that is has a stick resistant surface (outside and inside). Good pan, great conductivity. But it is still an aluminum pan; I prefer stainless steal on the inside.

Pay attention to handles. They should be metal (so that you can slide it in the oven) but still resist heat during normal stove-top cooking. Mauviel and Calphalon tend to become very hot. A handle with an upward curve makes it more comfortable to use. If it points up too much though, it makes it too high for practical use, especially if you are under 6'4". The handle should be solid: 3 rivets helps, but a smooth welded finish on the inside is easier to clean and is more sanitary. Sitram has the best in that respect (Collectivité and Magnum-Pro lines from France).

Weight ensures even heating, no scorching, no warping. However, if you are 80 years old and looking for a frying pan, maybe you need something lighter.

Overall, All-Clad is very good, but there are many companies doing the same concept for cheaper. Sitram being one of them. So look around. I'm always a bit suspicious of "celebrity" cookware lines. You pay for the name; I'd rather pay for actual quality.

I hope this gives you enough info to ask the right questions.

Good luck!
post #4 of 15
Dijt, here is what happened when I typed "cookware" into this board's search engine:

http://www.cheftalkcafe.com/forums/s...der=descending

You'll find a ton of conversations on this topic. I invite you to browse them and see if there's some useful information. Many of us like All-Clad (I have an Emeril non-stick set plus regular AC pieces) or similar and love them.

Good luck!
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post #5 of 15
For what it's worth, the Polished Stainless All-Clad are the only pieces in the All-Clad line that are dishwasher safe and functional on an induction range. The Master Chef line of All-Clad has brushed stainless exterior, so it won't show finger prints as easy as the polished exterior. Also, all of the All-Clad lids are stainless steel versus the Calphalon lids which are made with tempered glass domes.
Le Crueset is one of my favorite cookware lines. Certainly not every piece is practical for every application, but it is rugged stuff. It is individually sand cast iron cookware that is porcelain and enamel coated. Extremely heavy, extremely durable, extremely expensive. But, the dutch oven is a wonderful asset, as is the grill pan. The dutch oven runs $350 +/-.

Invention, my dear friends, is ninety-three percent perspiration, six percent electricity, four percent evaporation, and two percent butterscotch ripple

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Invention, my dear friends, is ninety-three percent perspiration, six percent electricity, four percent evaporation, and two percent butterscotch ripple

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post #6 of 15
I am a through and through All-Clad fan. It is by far my favorite all around cookware. Though I would love to own more Le Crueset also!!!
http://www.onceachef.com/ is my personal blog where I share many recipes, my passion for cooking, and all things food.
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http://www.onceachef.com/ is my personal blog where I share many recipes, my passion for cooking, and all things food.
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post #7 of 15
Hi dijt,

Welcome to Cheftalk!

:)

I also vote for All-Clad. You may want to consider what qualities to look for in cookware in general.

There is a thread on Buying Cookware with several sources for more information and opinions from Cheftalk members you may find informative.
post #8 of 15
I saw a thing on TV acouple of days ago about product with 2 names. All Clad is good - expensive but good. I love my All Clad more than the Magnalite pieces I have. (It ***tions better, stay cool handles, easy clean and it looks good:) ) However, according to this news report, All Clad is also marketed under the name "Emerile" at half the price!! Is it the exact same product made to the same standard or do they cut corners in the manufacturing process? I don't know but if the $$$ is tight it would be worth looking at.

Jock
post #9 of 15

different product lines

Jock,

They are not the exact same product under different names.

All-Clad has several different product lines: Stainless Steel, LTD Anondized, Master Chef, Copper Core, and Copper. All-Clad is made in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. For details, look here and here.

Emeril cookware was designed by Emeril Lagasse, in collaboration with All-Clad. It is manufactured in Korea under the Supervision of All-Clad Metalcrafters. While it is made to a particular standard and most likely of a higher quality than a majority of cookware lines on the market, it is made differently than the other All-Clad lines. For more information, look here.
post #10 of 15
Thanks cchiu. I had a feeling something like that might be the case. :)

Jock
post #11 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thanks to everyone for the input. It looks like I will probably go with the all clad. Your advice was very helpful.
Thanks
dijt
post #12 of 15
Use them in good health!
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post #13 of 15
dijt,

You'll be able to pass them on in your family for generations.... along with the cast iron skillet or Le Cruset peices.....

;)
post #14 of 15
Look what I got for Valentine's Day!



8 3/4 Qt. It ways a ton!
At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals.
www.kyleskitchen.net
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At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals.
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post #15 of 15
Use it in the best of health, Kyle!

I had a hand-me-down Le Creuset long ago. It fell on the floor and cracked. :cry: One of these days....
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