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What are your favourite ways to use buttermilk?

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
I just baked a buttermilk brownie; and I got rave reviews, and I was wondering what else people might use it for?
I'm lactose-intolerant myself; but do a lot of baking for church activies, and I enjoy being affectionately know as the bakergurl.
I try to be as creative as possible in my baking; and I would appreciate any advice that could help, thank you in advance.:)
Anne M. Johnstone.
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Anne M. Johnstone.
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post #2 of 29
B I S C U I T S!!!!!

(Our bready kind here in the States, that is, not the British cookie kind)
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #3 of 29
FRIED CHICKEN AND BISCUTS!!!!!!!
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #4 of 29
I was also going to say, before I had read this post, FRIED CHICKEN! Cape beat me to it. I used it once when making twice baked potatoes, also regular mashed, it adds that nice tang. MMMMM
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post #5 of 29
Creme Fraiche?
Back in the 80's I used it in muffin recipes...OMG:)
Lately, I've only used it in "homestyle" "ranch" dressings.
Love it though....my GF, who is from Poland, reminded me that they call it "sour milk" and often used it for breakfast much the same way you see yogurt used today, like with berries and such...
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post #6 of 29
Pancakes, waffles and creme fraiche.
Kevin
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Kevin
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post #7 of 29
A buttermilk question...

I don't use it often but did need some the other day for a recipe and could only find buttermilk marked "low fat" or "reduced fat". Went everywhere thinking I wanted "whole" or full fat (whatever that might be); an Albertson's, Smith's (the chain stores here in Santa Fe) then on to Whole Foods and an assortment of independent grocers. Never found it. Was I wrong to go looking ? Is there such a thing ?

FWIW, I ended up using the reduced fat stuff and did not notice that anything suffered but I'm still curious.
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Bob Sherwood
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post #8 of 29
Fyfas:

Most buttermilk that I've seen in supermarkets is marked as 'low fat'. However, on occasion I think I've seen 'regular', 'high fat' buttermilk also although it's less common than its low fat counterpart.

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #9 of 29
I like to use buttermilk in my clam chowder. Take any recipe for clam chowder but use half of the milk it says to use and use buttermilk for the other half
post #10 of 29
Waffles, the buttermilk givem them a little je ne sais quoi...
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

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When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

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post #11 of 29
pancakes also :lips:
post #12 of 29

ACID

It's the acid in buttermilk that reacts with baking powder giving rise to CO2 (I think) that causes the pancakes and other kinds of batters to rise.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #13 of 29
You shouldn't be able to find a "full fat" version of buttermilk. Originally, it was what was left after making butter so most of the fat ends up in the butter. So it's already a fat skimmed product.

From epicurious.com

Buttermilk of times past was the liquid left after butter was churned. Today it is made commercially by adding special bacteria to nonfat or lowfat milk, giving it a slightly thickened texture and tangy flavor. Some manufacturers add flecks of butter to give it an authentic look.


Phil
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #14 of 29
Scones! especially with dried cherries and clotted cream! :lips:

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Invention, my dear friends, is ninety-three percent perspiration, six percent electricity, four percent evaporation, and two percent butterscotch ripple

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post #15 of 29
I like to use Buttermilk in my breading of fish , especially catfish .
I take boneless catfish filets and cut them into fingers ( yes I call this catfish fingers ) kind of like a 1/4 inch american potato fry cut.
I put the fingers in a bowl of buttermilk and then dredge in seasoned bread crumbs. I like a little cajun seasoning in mine but the sky is the limit . Fry at 350 till they are floating and browned . Seved with a great tartar sauce , fried potatoes , and a kicked up cole slaw and man is this heaven . Oh , a good buttermilk biscuit might top it off also ?
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The two most common things in the universe are hydrogen and stupidity !
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post #16 of 29
Scones with buttermilk and cherries. It does sound wonderful Jim. :lips: I think I should start exploring the world of scones and put aiside the classic, but delicious, ginger scones....
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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post #17 of 29
It is my understanding that a "full fat" buttermilk would be about 2% max. and commonly 1%-2%.
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"...the very genesis of our art."
- Escoffier on grilling
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How come "dishwasher" is not listed as a choice for culinary experience?

"...the very genesis of our art."
- Escoffier on grilling
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post #18 of 29
Fried chicken is my #1 use for buttermilk. I marninate the chicken for 2 days in buttermilk, garlic and fresh sage. Makes great fried chicken!! I also used to have a great recipe for a Buttermilk-Lemon tart, though I think I have lost it.:mad: But I will add buttermilk to any recipe where I am looking for a little zing. Biscuits, cakes, fritters, soups (especially cold fruit soups), and mashed potatoes.
post #19 of 29
Thread Starter 

Thank you all so much for input.

This is the first time I started a topic that has go onto four pages; and I'm so happy to see so many ideas for using buttermilk. Unfortunately I live in Northern ON, Canada; and have never eaten catfish yet, but certainly hope to someday, especially since I love fish.
Does anyone know if buttermilk is easier to digest than cows milk; because I'm lactose-intolerant, but did hear that buttermilk is supposed to be easier to digest than regular milk?
:bounce:
Anne M. Johnstone.
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Anne M. Johnstone.
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post #20 of 29
bakergurl6,

Since you love to bake and discovered that your brownies containing buttermilk were a hit, you're on your way to learning that just about all cakes, brownies, etc. which include buttermilk as an ingredient gain an added richness and moisture to them.

As far as lactose intolerance. In reality, 70% - 90% of the entire world population is lactose intolerant. Buttermilk is made from cow's milk so it is still going to be high in lactose by definition as opposed to say, soy milks and rice milks.

Out of all the ingredients total, I'm sure that in the end, most people will only eat one or two brownies. Thus, the total consumption of buttermilk is minute in the big picture, as opposed to someone drinking an entire glass of milk and not being able to digest it properly or quickly enough to prevent problems.

Everything in moderation....

;)
post #21 of 29
buttermilk pie in the south, But how about ONION RINGS?!!!!
I use it for waffles, pancakes, buttermilk dressing and occasionally it is called for in cakes.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #22 of 29

Buttermilk in Pasta

I am a child of the deep south so I grew up using buttermilk in the southern applications of biscuits, pancakes, pies, etc..

My grandmother always soaked her chicken in buttermilk for at least a day before cooking fried chicken. My grandfather often dipped his hot cornbread in a glass of buttermilk.
I have used buttermilk in pasta dishes. Usually I make a fairly thin tomato sauce, add some buttermilk and thicken slightly. Add some diced pancetta or proscuitto. Toss your cooked pasta (penne) in and serve. It's delicious.
I'm not big on Ranch dressing, but buttermilk is essential in making a good one.

dickie
post #23 of 29
Since your a baker, I think of buttermilk in bundt cakes, quick coffee cakes (meaning ones leavened with powder vs. yeast), buttermilk doughnuts are yummy too!

Use it in place of reg. milk in any recipes.....

But I think my favorite use is in biscuits, served fresh...yum...!!
"Bakers are born, not made. We are exacting people who delight in submitting ourselves to rules and formulas if it means achieving repeatable perfection", Rose Levy Beranbaum
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"Bakers are born, not made. We are exacting people who delight in submitting ourselves to rules and formulas if it means achieving repeatable perfection", Rose Levy Beranbaum
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post #24 of 29
I use buttermilk in my red velvet cakes...
Cooking is a passion I can't seem to find elsewhere
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Cooking is a passion I can't seem to find elsewhere
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post #25 of 29

Buttermilk

Hey, doesn't anyone out there ever DRINK the stuff? As an unreconstructed southerner, I grew up with buttermilk as my favorite tipple (few people in the south drink so-called sweet milk). Moreover, I still love it, nor, because it is made with a culture and fermented, does it bother my slight lactose intolerance. However, there are many different kinds of buttermilk. Each manufacturer has its own culture, and therefore taste and texture can vary widely. I prefer buttermilk that is quite thick, tart, and somewhat salty, and find this best for baking (and drinking). Avoid buttermilk that has been thickened with carageenan; it tends to break down somewhat during baking. In the long run, you must search and try until you find one that suits you!
post #26 of 29

buttermilk

This chocolate cake recipe
http://users.rcn.com/rsmit999/random...olate_cake.jpg results in zero leftovers.

You might as well forget about eating anything else if one of these puppies is hanging around.
post #27 of 29
Oat farls - a type of scone - is my favorite recipe for using buttermilk. I soak oatmeal in buttermilk overnight to start the process. That is the traditional method that activates the enzyme phytase, which works to break down phytic acid in the bran of grains.

I also have a process to make cultured buttermilk. If you take a quart of milk (your choice - I use fresh goats milk) and culture (inoculate) it with either 1/2 c. of commercial buttermilk or 1/2 c. of reconstitued powdered buttermilk. Allow to sit at room temperature until it clabbers (overnight). You can continue batching from this, almost like making yogurt. Just use a 1/2 cup of the cultured buttermilk to inoculate the next quart of milk each time and process like you did the first time. This method makes a very tasty buttermilk. Much better than the tasteless reconstituted powdered version.
post #28 of 29
Like my friend Panini, another of my favorite ways to use buttermilk is to pour a good gallon of it in my favorite ceramic bowl and soak my feet in it after a long day looking for work...

The active cultures really do a good job of keeping them soft and supple.:D
Walk softly, carry a big rolling pin
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post #29 of 29

Lots of uses for buttermilk

*Coating chicken and fish for breading and frying
*Delicious component in Refrigerator Bran Muffins (with lots of blueberries and lemon zest)
*Helps make moist meatballs
*Chocolate Cake ingredient
*Biscuits

We almost always have buttermilk in the refrigerator.


Becca
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