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Just for the challah vit!

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
I have been testing recipes for forthcoming book on breds of the Diaspora. I had no idea that there were so many variations on the challah thing. Sweet and savory, all different shapes and sizes and stories to match. This is before even considering babkas and other cousins. What are peoples favorite Jewish breads?
"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
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"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
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post #2 of 23
Well, we can't forget matzoh or bagels (and all their endless varieties).
What have you tested lately?
post #3 of 23
Thread Starter 
So far...

Apple Challah
Babka
Barbari
Churek
Rosca
Moroccan Purim Bread
Savory Olive Oil Challah
Semolina Challah
Various "regular" challahs

and for Vivian...

Pan de Horiadaki

On my own I'm playing with a wild yeast version of the Olive Oil Challah. First attempt was fair at best.
"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
Reply
"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
Reply
post #4 of 23
Kyle, any versions with saffron? I've read some include that.

I have my grandmother's recipe- sort of. She never measured, of course, so my mom watched her bake three batches in various types of weather, and came up with a 'compromise' version which I was instructed to tweak as necessary. The memory of my Baubie's hands in the dough are vivid and evoke strong emotions. You've inspired me to pull out her breadboard and get some fresh yeast!

Are you aware of the custom of baking two loaves for the Sabbath? And of shaping variations? My grandmother's New Year challah was round (of course), with the tail pulled up on top and cut to look like a little hand, blessing the bread. It's another very fond childhood memory.

I'm sure Cape Chef will have plenty to say about bagels and bialys!
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post #5 of 23
Thread Starter 
the shaping has been rather traditional. One notable exception has been Haman, pictured below. Isn't Purim next week?

"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
Reply
"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
Reply
post #6 of 23
Wow, Kyle. Pass the butter! :lips:

Yes, Purim is almost upon us. The Fast of Esther is on March 17; Purim itself is the next day, and Shushan Purim, celebrated in Israel, is the 19th.

Making any hamentaschen, anyone? What's your favorite filling? I'm partial to a soft dough (with orange juice in it) and prune or poppyseed (mohn) filling.

Kyle, I've never seen a loaf like the one above. What are its origins? I have a rather parochial Eastern European take on things, and am delighted to learn of other traditions.
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post #7 of 23
Thread Starter 
My sources tell me it is Moroccan. It's called Haman's Eyes and the eggs are his eyes, x'ed out for bad behavior. THe eggs are hard cooked and then baked into the bread. The dough has anise, almond, raisins etc. IT very tasty.
"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
Reply
"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
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post #8 of 23
Great story. A tasty way to show the requisite scorn for a villian!
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post #9 of 23
It's a gorgeous bread. I've never seen that.
There are a few on your list that I've never heard of.
Let's start with Barbari...:confused:
post #10 of 23
Thread Starter 
I'm told that barbari is an every day bread in Iran. It's about 1/4" high.

"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
Reply
"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
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post #11 of 23
What is the topping? It looks something like the traditional Bialy filling of poppy seed and onion.

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Invention, my dear friends, is ninety-three percent perspiration, six percent electricity, four percent evaporation, and two percent butterscotch ripple

My Author Page

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post #12 of 23
Thread Starter 
The onions would be a nice addition. This is an egg wash with poppy and sesame seeds.
"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
Reply
"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
Reply
post #13 of 23
Yum. Like an "everything" focaccia. The photos are a helpful addition, and the breads are so pretty. Thanks for sharing them.

I'm curious about the churek too. It also sounds middle eastern. (I'm hoping to see more pictures;) ).
post #14 of 23
Thread Starter 
Your wish...

Churek is rumored to be a traditional Sabath bread.

"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
Reply
"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
Reply
post #15 of 23
i'm just curious, who on cheftalk is jewish. I'm surprised to see so many people that seem knowledgable about the food and traditions. Maybe this isn't the right thread for the question but whatever.

Ron
post #16 of 23
Thread Starter 
Me, I'm an Epsicopalian, with a Jewish girlfriend, who's testing recipes for a book on breads of the Diaspora:)
"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
Reply
"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
Reply
post #17 of 23
I am greek born in Israel with a Israeli-greek-jewish mother.Basically I am Greek for the good or for the worse :D

Kyle!!! Strange. We make churek for the Ortodox Easter!!!

And it needs a great art... some people use this dough to make vassilopita, (the pie with the coin) for the New Year.

I consider churek very difficult. Do you make those?

Another one. Do you include any kind of ritual breads in this category?
"Muabet de Turko,kama de Grego i komer de Djidio", old sefardic proverb ( Three things worth in life: the gossip of the Turk , the bed of the Greek and the food of the Jew)
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"Muabet de Turko,kama de Grego i komer de Djidio", old sefardic proverb ( Three things worth in life: the gossip of the Turk , the bed of the Greek and the food of the Jew)
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post #18 of 23
Thread Starter 
I did not find this particular churek too difficult. Maybe it's different than the ones you make. It's pretty much a staight forward challah. From the recipes I've seen, vassilopita is indeed very similar. What is mahlepi?

As to ritual breads, I think Haman's Eyes are as close as I've come. I am learning as I get the recipes :)
"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
Reply
"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
Reply
post #19 of 23
I love your new kitchen Kyle, what a change it must be for you. :)
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

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When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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post #20 of 23
The churek is beautiful and the view of the street below is tantalizing! I hope to walk those streets again this summer....
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post #21 of 23
Tantalizing...just the word that came to my mind!

I'm Jewish, American, and of Syrian descent. As I was growing up, my parents and grandparents made it a point to familiarize us with Syrian foods. Unfortunately, ethnic breads didn't play a big role at our dinner table. We usually ate challah on holidays and Shabbat.

Kyle, I love it!! These breads are remarkable!
post #22 of 23
Thread Starter 
Ain't the new kitchen a hoot! With windows and everything. Learning about the relationship of bread to culture ain't all bad either:)
"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
Reply
"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
Reply
post #23 of 23
dear kyle,
one word. WOW!
fantastic pictures, i'm sitting here trying to wipe the drool off the computer screen.
kat
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