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lemon thyme?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Does anyone know of a source for dried lemon thyme?

I've looked everywhere, online and off, and can't seem to find it :(

Thanks for any help :)
twy
~Curry Lover~
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twy
~Curry Lover~
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post #2 of 10
Dear twylyn:

Lemon thyme is one of my most favorite herbs! I wish you had posted your question in the "Chef's Garden" forum because a lot of us gardeners treasure this herb not only for its taste but also because it is one of the best complements to a rock garden.

Although your question inquired about the existence of dried lemon thyme which I have not seen, I highly recommend buying your favorite variety of lemon thyme which can even be grown in colder climates, such as the northeastern part of the country,and drying the sprigs for culinary as well as aesthetic uses. In France, we always had fresh herbs drying in the house for practical as well as decorative use. There are several varieties of lemon scented thyme that you might find.

T. "Aureus" Golden lemon creeping thyme, is a creeper with pink flowers and golden-lemon leaves. (Ht.: 3 inches)

T. x citriodorus, is a shrub with pale lilac flowers and lemon-scented, bright green leaves. (Ht.: 12 inches)

T. "Doone Valley", is a creeper with pale purple flowers and lemon-scented, bright green leaves with gold splashes. (Ht.: 3 inches)

T. x citriodorus "Silver Lemon Queen", is a shrub with pale pink flowers and lemony, silver-splashed leaves. (Ht.: 12 inches)

T. "Lemon Curd", is a creeper with pink flowers, long wiry branches and narrow, sweet lemon-scented, green leaves. (Ht.: 2 inches)

T. "Citriodorus", is a creeper with pink flowers and large, strongly lemon-scented, green leaves. (Ht.: 6 inches)

As you can see from the list above, the most commonly used lemon thyme is the Citriodorus which has many varieties. This type of thyme is often used as an ingredient in sweet foods (Lemon thyme-flavored jelly), to flavor oils, vinegars, and table olives, and in potpouris. It is a favorite of ours in chicken dishes and even in yogurt spreads (made using yogurt "cheese" [i.e. yogurt with much of the liquid whey drained with a cheese cloth], salt and sugar to taste, a little extra virgin olive oil and chopped fresh lemon thyme and basil).

I hope that this helps.

:)
"Olio nuovo e vino vecchio"
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"Olio nuovo e vino vecchio"
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post #3 of 10
Did you try here?

or at Penzey's
3028 Hennepin Avenue
Minneapolis, MN

Tel: (612) 824-9777

Good luck Twylyn.

:p

[ June 27, 2001: Message edited by: Kimmie ]
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
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K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
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post #4 of 10
twylyn,

I agree with Papa. You should pick up a starter plant for the same price you would pay for the dried version anyway.

Then you could use fresh or dried. If you're in a hurry, you can nuke them in the microwave to use them dried.

Did you know there is also:
lime thyme
orange spice thyme thyme

orange mint
pineapple mint
chocolate mint

pineapple sage
tangerine sage

Good sources for herbs:

The Herb Man

Horizon Herbs

Richters

Park Seed

If your really want the dried herb, browse these places (in no particular order)...

Tons of sources for you to browse.

Spices Etc.

Penn Herb

The CMC Company
All kinds of spices from around the world.

The Pepperer's Guild

Natural Treasures

DragonMarsh

Ethnic Grocer

Spicer

Herbie's Spices
:cool:

[ June 27, 2001: Message edited by: cchiu ]
post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 
Wonderful information and links...thanks so much, Papa, Kimmie and cchiu!

I didn't know there were so many varieties of lemon thyme, thyme and the other herbs mentioned...pineapple sage sounds interesting.

I found one source in Australia for dried lemon thyme...I need to call Penzey's in Minneapolis, yet; but even if I get the dried version I think I will still add a lemon thyme plant to my herb patch :)

I first started looking for dried lemon thyme for this "sweet herb mix" (which I've been mixing without the lemon thyme):

1/2 cup dried parsley
3/8 cup dried marjoram
3/8 cup dried chervil
1/8 cup dried basil
1-1/2 Tbsp. dried thyme
1-1/2 Tbsp. dried lemon thyme
1-1/2 Tbsp. summer savory
1 Tbsp. tarragon

(mix & store in airtight container)

But, I've since found many great-sounding recipes using lemon thyme, which I'm very anxious to try! Lemon thyme-flavored jelly sounds great, Papa :)

[ June 28, 2001: Message edited by: twylyn ]
twy
~Curry Lover~
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twy
~Curry Lover~
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post #6 of 10
What do you use your "sweet herb mix" for, twylyn?

[ June 28, 2001: Message edited by: Kimmie ]
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
Reply
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
Reply
post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 
Kimmie,

I can't remember where I originally copied the "Sweet Herb Mix" from, but it was recommended for steamed veggies such as carrots and parsnips (I've only tried it with carrots)--and I've also used it on baked chicken breasts :)
twy
~Curry Lover~
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twy
~Curry Lover~
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post #8 of 10

twylyn,  try my favorite soup seasoning.  equal parts basil, savory and lemon thyme.  I use it in just about every soup I make.  Just add to taste.

post #9 of 10

GOSH GOLLY!!!

 

This is a cool thread. Nice replies from everyone. PAPA, yours was a great start. Thanks everyone. 

 

250px-Spice_thyme_scale.jpg 220px-Abella_en_farigola.JPG 250px-Variegated_Lemon_Thyme_Thymus_citriodorus_variegata_Leaves_3264px.JPG

Thymus vulgaris is a source of a very good honey.

               

Thymus × citriodorus (synonym T. fragrantissimus, T. serpyllum citratus and T. serpyllum citriodorum) (citrus thyme). Cultivars are selected for aromas of different citrus fruits:

Lemon thyme (Thymus × citriodorus) — lemon

Orange thyme (Thymus × citriodorus 'Orange') — orange, unusually low growing

Silver thyme (Thymus × citriodorus 'Argenteus' or variegata) — lemon, variegated with white or yellow

Thymus herba-barona (caraway thyme) is used both as a culinary herb and a ground cover, and has a very strong caraway scent due to the chemical carvone.

Thymus pseudolanuginosus (woolly thyme) is not a culinary herb, but is grown as a ground cover.

Thymus serpyllum (wild thyme, creeping thyme) is an important nectar source plant for honeybees. All thyme species are nectar sources, but wild thyme covers large areas of droughty, rocky soils in southern Europe (Greece is especially famous for wild thyme honey) and North Africa, as well as in similar landscapes in the Berkshire and Catskill Mountains of the northeastern US. The lowest-growing of the widely used thyme, it is good for walkways.

Thymus vulgaris (common thyme, English thyme, summer thyme, winter thyme, French thyme, or garden thyme) is a commonly used culinary herb. It also has medicinal uses. Common thyme is a Mediterranean perennial which is best suited to well-drained soils and full sun.

 

(Hey look, I just felt like adding to the discussion.)

 

post #10 of 10

Home Depot   Buy a plant $2.99 and hang it in dark dry place.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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