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Dumplings

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
My grandmother used to make wonderful fluffy dumplings in chicken soup. I tried last night and they were awful lumpy doughy wads. Can someone give me a recipe for light fluffy dumplings please.
post #2 of 5

Here's the recipe I've put together

Ingredients:
1 cup all purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons fresh parsley, minced
1 large egg
1/2 cup buttermilk

Instructions:
Combine dry ingredients (first 4) in mixing bowl. Whisk together the egg and buttermilk. Pour into dry ingredients and mix only until combined (don't over mix).

Drop by spoonfuls onto chicken mixture (when making chicken & dumplings). Replace lid and steam/cook for 10 to 12 minutes. Remove lid and flip dumplings so both sides are cooked with chicken "juice". Replace lid and finish for about 5 minutes.

They are light and flavorful.

Note: make sure your baking powder is fresh and reactive. (Foams when you add a little to water).

Good luck! Love chicken and dumplings!

Becca
post #3 of 5
Ever try making traditional Matzah Balls?
2 Eggs
2 tbsp Chicken fat, or vegetable oil
1/2 cup Matzo meal
1 tsp -Salt
1 1/2 tsp Dill, fresh, chopped
2 tbsp Chicken soup, or water

Procedure:
1. Combine eggs with chicken fat or oil.
2. In another bowl, combine matzo meal, salt and dill.
3. Stir 2 mixtures together, add chicken soup or water.
4. Refrigerate at least 2 hours or overnight.
5. Shape mixture (it should be like dough) into golf-ball sized balls, moistening hands with water to prevent sticking.
6. Drop balls into large pot of boiling water seasoned with salt and pepper.
7. Reduce heat, cover and simmer 45 minutes.
8. After cooking, matzo balls should be the size of meatballs.
9. Remove matzo balls from water and place in chicken soup to absorb flavor.

Not necessarily traditional dumplings... but, hey, for some us they are!! Or, of course, you can always use Bisquick!! Works great!

Invention, my dear friends, is ninety-three percent perspiration, six percent electricity, four percent evaporation, and two percent butterscotch ripple

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Invention, my dear friends, is ninety-three percent perspiration, six percent electricity, four percent evaporation, and two percent butterscotch ripple

My Author Page

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post #4 of 5
Thread Starter 

Dumplings

Thanks for the recipes - I'll try both this weekend.
My second question is how do you store baking powder? I live in an old Florida house without air conditioning. I buy the smallest containers of BP that I can find and keep it tightly sealed but it still goes flat/dies. Should I keep it in the frig? freezer?
post #5 of 5

Avoid Moisture

Moisture is the death of baking powder. Living in Florida, with the humidity is not helping. Storing in the refrigerator or freezer won't help either. You can try keeping the baking powder container in a ziplock bag, or just replace it frequently if you can't keep it dry.
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