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Gino's East Pizza Crust - Page 4

post #91 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by frabotta View Post

Hi Spencer,

Where do you buy the flavor enhancer with the creme de tartar?  Do you have to use fresh bakers yeast or can i use dry?

Elyce
Hi Elyce
The flavor enhancer was made by a company called Saratoga and was used at Gino's
For home use, just follow my recipe I posted earlier.
I already did all of the proportions and everything is the same ratios
Of what Gino's east uses.
yes u do use creamed of Tartar and active dry yeast.
I posted it toward the beginning of the thread. A lot of hard work and research went into it.
It is "the recipe" for Gino crust. Nothing comes closer. And yes I can be confident on this because I know how much work went into it
And I already tried everything else:-)

Enjoy
Spencer
post #92 of 114

This looks completely wrong.  It looks like you tried to make a pizza dough cake and topped it like a lasagna .  Your crust looks a deep fried Empanada.. sorry but your pizza his is not correct.

 

Butter is  one of the the secrets...another is the pan.  Work on the dough by itself before adding any toppings next time.

post #93 of 114

Interesting Post ...

 

Being Italian on the paternal side, and my Nonna was a Trattoria Chef and Co-owner, I am always interested in Italy and Italian regional cuisines, recipes and how to´s ...

 

Sheer reading pleasure,

Thanks.

Marge.


Edited by margcata - 8/29/12 at 10:49am
post #94 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lukas Dinatello View Post

This looks completely wrong.  It looks like you tried to make a pizza dough cake and topped it like a lasagna .  Your crust looks a deep fried Empanada.. sorry but your pizza his is not correct.

 

Butter is  one of the the secrets...another is the pan.  Work on the dough by itself before adding any toppings next time.

Hi Lukas,

 

who exactly are you directing your comments to?  Are you familiar with deep dish pizza because not sure what you mean about lasagna, but if it is the cheese slices you are talking about on top of the dough, then that is how it is done.  I would suggest if you are going to say that something is incorrect, first contribute why, and second contribute what you would do different.

 

thanks

Spencer

post #95 of 114

Hi guys,

 

 

I just read a blog where the author claims to have finally figured out the recipe for Giordano's deep dish pizza. I know this discussion is about Gino's East, but he said something in the blog that really intrigued me and I wanted to confirm it with you guys. He said I should cover the edges/crust part with foil to prevent it from burning. Wouldn't doing that result in the total opposite, which is burned crust? :S

post #96 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Syifani Arifun View Post

Hi guys,

 

 

I just read a blog where the author claims to have finally figured out the recipe for Giordano's deep dish pizza. I know this discussion is about Gino's East, but he said something in the blog that really intrigued me and I wanted to confirm it with you guys. He said I should cover the edges/crust part with foil to prevent it from burning. Wouldn't doing that result in the total opposite, which is burned crust? :S

Hey Syifani

sure pizza is pizza so its all good with me :-)  not sure what you mean by covering the edge of the crust with foil.  I mean, I know what you mean, but specifically not sure if you mean to just cover the edge or cover the entire top of the pizza.  I worked at a place before that did stuffed pizzas and since they are so thick, we would take a piece of foil and kind of crumple it a little and then cover the pizza during the last 10 minutes of cooking to force the bottom of the pie to cook more --- especially if there was sausage at the bottom because in a stuffed pizza, sausage is usually put on top of the bottom dough raw.

but it was not to stop the top from burning as much as it was to make the bottom cook more.  

hope this helps

Spencer

post #97 of 114

Yikes, yellow food coloring or tumeric to pizza dough? I use a good quality olive oil and do add some corn flour like you guys and enjoy it that way.

post #98 of 114

Nice Blog. Thanks for the recipes
 

post #99 of 114

Hello,

could you please let me know more about Gino's pizza? I adore pizzas and so far my favourite one is the authentic italian pizza with mozarella and tomatoes, you could check the process of making it at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ilRD5QHKJTk

post #100 of 114

Hard to get good Chicago pizza in Seattle. I make my own with Pastorelli sauce and whole milk mozzarella. I'm still experimenting with the dough and adding other types of cheese.

post #101 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Syifani Arifun View Post
 

Hi guys,

 

 

I just read a blog where the author claims to have finally figured out the recipe for Giordano's deep dish pizza. I know this discussion is about Gino's East, but he said something in the blog that really intrigued me and I wanted to confirm it with you guys. He said I should cover the edges/crust part with foil to prevent it from burning. Wouldn't doing that result in the total opposite, which is burned crust? :S

Hey Syfani,

which book did you read out of curiosity?  Is Giordano's your favorite?  

 

thanks

Spencer

post #102 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by olyavera View Post
 

Hello,

could you please let me know more about Gino's pizza? I adore pizzas and so far my favourite one is the authentic italian pizza with mozarella and tomatoes, you could check the process of making it at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ilRD5QHKJTk

yeah that looks like great pizza.  those hot burning ovens usually powered by wood or coal give a really cool flavor.  

yeah you can look through the blog and get the Gino's crust recipe and cook it just like in this video and it will taste totally different but just as awesome

post #103 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by stewkelly View Post
 

Yikes, yellow food coloring or tumeric to pizza dough? I use a good quality olive oil and do add some corn flour like you guys and enjoy it that way.

hey, I agree turmeric would probably add a very different flavor ---- so would not recommend that, but it is true that Gino's is the only Chicago Deep Dish pizza

that uses Yellow Dye and does not use Corn Meal.  The only one in Chicago that uses Corn Meal is Gino's on Rush which is totally different than Gino's East.

Never tried corn flour --- perhaps that is not as bitter as corn meal ---- but all the books say corn meal and using more than 1 tbspn to 1 lbs of Flour results in a bitter crust.

 

However, it can add some dimension to the crust.  

yeah Gino's, Uno's and Lou Malnatis crust is basically whatever the amount of water you use, use 1/2 that in oil mixture (usually 95% corn and 5% extra virgin olive) or sometimes (80% corn and 20% extra virgin olive)  or in Lou's case it adds some butter.  Then you have to let it rise overnight so it has a fermented flavor.  Then use a lot of oil in the pan making sure to not use a lot of dough on the bottom.  Uno's I believe adds the most oil the 1: 1/2 water to oil ratio where Gino's adds a little less --- 1 : 1/3 water to oil ratio.

post #104 of 114

Not sure if anybody ever tried this, but once I got the Gino's pizza recipe down and knew it like the back of my hand, the next part of the equation was having a good oven.  No matter what, the home oven does not even compare to a professional Bakers Pride or Bloggett stone deck oven.  

 

I never tried this and don't have the time now, but I know the basic concept of those professional ovens are simple ---- an insulated metal box that is surrounded by stone on the door, floor, ceiling, and sides.  

 

Therefore, theoretically, all you need is a box with heat and just create an "oven within an oven"

 

In other words, if you can find a pizza stone and buy them big enough, I believe it is possible to have them cut and just stack them inside the oven.  

 

First lay down the floor, then the side walls and back walls ---- no adhesive necessary and you would not want to.

just stack them.  Then lay down the top.  

 

so you create a "stone box" inside of your oven.  Then you can create a door to just put in front.  make sure you pizza peel can fit inside.  

 

you have to heat the oven to like 475 to 500 F and let it take about an hour.  Then use a thermometer to calibrate it.

 

I think that the pizza will taste like a pizza that comes out of a professional oven.  Using this Ginos recipe I provided on this thread which actually took a few years of my life to figure out ---- everyone here has it for free :-)  and this "stone box" inside your oven idea ---- I believe it is possible to create it to taste actually better.  Let's face it now Gino's uses a mixture of conveyer oven as well as stone ovens.  The stone ovens are much better.  Uno's and Lou Malnatis uses stone ovens

 

just giving another idea I think would work well.  

I remember when we were putting pizzas in a restaurant my dad owned at the time and we made a Gino's pizza using my recipe and the professional oven.  It was literally 100 times better than what I made at home in my Gas Oven which still goes to 550 if I want.

 

It is the distribution of heat is uneven.  so I believe that this idea keeps the heat even and therefore makes it right.  Just an idea if anybody has some time and enthusiasm :-) 

post #105 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul L View Post
 

Hard to get good Chicago pizza in Seattle. I make my own with Pastorelli sauce and whole milk mozzarella. I'm still experimenting with the dough and adding other types of cheese.

post #106 of 114

@Spinnybobo, Thanks for the tip about letting it rest overnight to ferment a bit. Is that in the refrigerator or just a cool place? I find the corn flour makes the dough a bit lighter....but I think corn meal on the bottom of the dough will help prevent sticking to the stone.

post #107 of 114

Born and raised in Chicago - have been here 42 years. I love Gino's East pizza crust. It tastes lighter and more airy than Giordano's or Lou Malnati's. Giordano's is more like a biscuit crust.  But I prefer Giordano's crust.  We're off to try Burt's Place Saturday night. Supposedly tastes like Pequod's with a caramelized crust. 

I could live on bread and cheese alone.

Reply

I could live on bread and cheese alone.

Reply
post #108 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by stewkelly View Post
 

@Spinnybobo, Thanks for the tip about letting it rest overnight to ferment a bit. Is that in the refrigerator or just a cool place? I find the corn flour makes the dough a bit lighter....but I think corn meal on the bottom of the dough will help prevent sticking to the stone.

Hey stewkelly

 

you can let it ferment on kitchen counter overnight or let it ferment in fridge for a few days.  Gino's ferments it in the fridge for 3 days already pressed into the pan with 1 layer of cheese on top.  when they get an order, they put the other layer of cheese on top, sauce, then throw it in the oven.

 

Yes corn meal on the outside of a thin crust pizza that is cooked directly on the stone gives an amazing flavor.  In a deep dish pan, there is so much oil in the dough and pan that it is almost fried.  

post #109 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColleenS View Post
 

Born and raised in Chicago - have been here 42 years. I love Gino's East pizza crust. It tastes lighter and more airy than Giordano's or Lou Malnati's. Giordano's is more like a biscuit crust.  But I prefer Giordano's crust.  We're off to try Burt's Place Saturday night. Supposedly tastes like Pequod's with a caramelized crust. 

hey ColleenS

 

yeah Pizzeria Uno has that carmelized effect.  Pretty cool.  When you have a super hot evenly distributed pizza oven, it is actually making the pizza kinda "sloppy" which gives it that effect.  That gives it the Chicago look because it has a very "non perfect" type of construction.  It is just put together really fast.  The dough on the sides is squished to make it look like a pie crust.  It is not evenly done.  The cheese kinda overruns and burns which I believe causes the carmelized effect.  very cool the first time I was able to do this, but only worked in a real pizza oven.  I don't care if the home oven can go to 550F, it just won't turn out the same.

 

I never tried Pequod's Pizza but I saw some pics and they look great.  Kinda looks like Uno's.  except crust looks a little less high on edges like Lou's.  very cool stuff.  Let us know how it was.  

post #110 of 114

@ Spinnybobo

Burt's was very good - got the mushroom and double sausage.  The depth of the pizza was not as deep as I had expected.  I did enjoy and like the crust. We all agreed the sauce was really good. I did think the cheese was put on more sparsely than prefer.  Burt lives up to his TV persona coming off kind of gruff. 

 

I agree the cheese must be what caramelizes the crust. So good.

 

Have you tried Chicago Pizza and Oven Grinder's pizzas?  They look like a mushroom  shape or a pot pie when brought to your table as they are baked upside down in round casserole dishes.  The cheese oozes out when the server unveils it by flipping them out onto your plate at the table.  Very good, but definitely not pizza - more like a twist on a calzone.

I could live on bread and cheese alone.

Reply

I could live on bread and cheese alone.

Reply
post #111 of 114

I am in favor of Pizza from Rome Italy. It is made with a sour dough starter and special flour which includes Italian 000 (2/3) and classic European artisan bread flour (1/3) that has some ash and is made from winter wheat. Also necessary are sea salt and a little olive oil. If the flour is not right, the crust will never be great. See King Arthur for these flours.

 

My bread starter is fermented until the lactic acid makes is smell sour, which involves feeding it over a minimum of three days (room temperature), or longer if your yeast is not the instant variety.

 

King Arthur has an excellent pizza blend as well as a flavor enhancer that enriches the doughs flavor.

 

I let the mixed dough mature a whole day or more in the refrigerator, then rise again at room temperature until it doubles its size. This also improves the nutrition of the crust.

 

The pizza is best in a very hot wood fired pizza oven. I use my BBQ grill equiped with a ceramatic floor tile and a wood smoke box at 600~650 F.

 

degrees. A thin crust pizz cooks in 6 minutes or less. For more see my blog on

Pizza Dough and Baking Pizza on your Grill (6-2011)

post #112 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColleenS View Post
 

@ Spinnybobo

Burt's was very good - got the mushroom and double sausage.  The depth of the pizza was not as deep as I had expected.  I did enjoy and like the crust. We all agreed the sauce was really good. I did think the cheese was put on more sparsely than prefer.  Burt lives up to his TV persona coming off kind of gruff. 

 

I agree the cheese must be what caramelizes the crust. So good.

 

Have you tried Chicago Pizza and Oven Grinder's pizzas?  They look like a mushroom  shape or a pot pie when brought to your table as they are baked upside down in round casserole dishes.  The cheese oozes out when the server unveils it by flipping them out onto your plate at the table.  Very good, but definitely not pizza - more like a twist on a calzone.

Hey Colleen. 

no never tried Over Grinder's but I heard of it.  sounds great :-) 

post #113 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve TPHC View Post
 

I am in favor of Pizza from Rome Italy. It is made with a sour dough starter and special flour which includes Italian 000 (2/3) and classic European artisan bread flour (1/3) that has some ash and is made from winter wheat. Also necessary are sea salt and a little olive oil. If the flour is not right, the crust will never be great. See King Arthur for these flours.

 

My bread starter is fermented until the lactic acid makes is smell sour, which involves feeding it over a minimum of three days (room temperature), or longer if your yeast is not the instant variety.

 

King Arthur has an excellent pizza blend as well as a flavor enhancer that enriches the doughs flavor.

 

I let the mixed dough mature a whole day or more in the refrigerator, then rise again at room temperature until it doubles its size. This also improves the nutrition of the crust.

 

The pizza is best in a very hot wood fired pizza oven. I use my BBQ grill equiped with a ceramatic floor tile and a wood smoke box at 600~650 F.

 

degrees. A thin crust pizz cooks in 6 minutes or less. For more see my blog on

Pizza Dough and Baking Pizza on your Grill (6-2011)

Hey Steve

this sounds amazing.  I tried to hit the link for your blog but it says I do not have access.  Do you have it on a private setting?  

sounds great though.  I always wanted to learn how to make more of a thin crust Italian wood or coal oven type deal.  

thanks

Spencer

post #114 of 114

I worked as a waitress just out of college in 1980 at the old Genos location on Superior. The cook was named Joe who took pity on a poor starving girl and always had a staff meal for me when I arrived for a 10 hour shift. One day he invited me to watch him make dough. The secret to Ginos crust is or was, a yellow food coloring made from eggs. He put in a big squirt for each batch of dough. No corn meal was ever used in the crust, ever! The food coloring is responsible for the yellow color and the egg base creates the unique texture.

 

The dough was never refrigerated, it was made fresh throughout the day. It would sit in a big tub for an hour or so and then a cook would portion it into the pans that had tons of olive oil in them. Then they were stacked and waited for orders. They could sit for a couple of hours like that without any change in the texture of the crust. So finally, mystery solved.

 

I get a very close version of the Ginos crust by throwing a large egg yolk into my dough mix after adding the liquid. 

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