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2 Weeks Notice

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
It's been an incredibly long time since I've posted here. In that time I've worked my way through all but two of the stations in the restaurant I am working in in Atlanta. At this point it's become too frustrating to me as a job as well as my commute being rather bothersome as of late (1 hour with perfect traffic, 2 hours if it's bad). So I'm putting in my 2 weeks. My question is, what is the best way to go about this? I'm pretty sure I'm a valuable employee and will be asked to stay longer than this, but I also know that right now I REALLY want to get out of this situation so that I can look back on this kitchen as a positive experience. Any suggestions?

Matt
post #2 of 18
Don't burn bridges with the present employer. Honey is more attractive.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 
Yeah, the last thing I want to do is burn bridges, but I also want to get outta there post haste. The thing is, I LOVE the kitchen. I think I take as much pride in the food coming out of that kitchen as the Exec does. On the other hand I can't stand some of the management decisions that are made. Add to that the fact that I want to work somewhere closer to home before going to the CIA and it's become a situation where every day I work there I constantly think about getting out of there.

How do I put in my two weeks and not burn bridges while still being honest about my reasons? Should I just leave the disagreements I have with some of the management decisions out and just give the other reasons (commute, less stress)? Thing is I really do like the Exec and I know he really does try to do everything to make it a good kitchen, I just personally disagree with some of the decisions.
post #4 of 18
Accentuate the positive. Everyone leaves their job due to low pay, management, personalities...

Rather, state your desire for a position with the CIA that offers this, that, and the other attributes thay you feel would be a better match.

I've just been given notice by IBM of layoff. Doing some real soul searching over the past week I had a really honest talk with my manager. Rather than state how top heavy the company is, how slow and bureaucratic things seem, I expressed a strong desire to return to teaching - in Kansas, to a job more rewarding and a lifestyle more relaxing than what the Denver area has to offer. Small town Kansas, here I come.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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post #5 of 18
Matt--I agree with Kokopuffs; keep it positive (and keep the negatives to yourself). You never know when that last impression of you will come back to help or haunt you in the future.

And Kokopuffs--Wow! You're really making some huge decisions (even if the push that got you started was external rather than internal). But it sounds like these decisions are very, very positive. I'm really happy for you. When do you leave? Could you share with us more about what you're feeling about all this? What will you be teaching?

All the best of luck to both of you! :D
Emily

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"If you are not killing plants, you are not really stretching yourself as a gardener." -- J. C. Raulston, American Horticulturist
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Emily

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"If you are not killing plants, you are not really stretching yourself as a gardener." -- J. C. Raulston, American Horticulturist
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post #6 of 18
Phoebe:

I haven't yet been accepted for the program but the latter will open up at the end of the month. Plenty of need for science teachers. And with my extensive chiropractic and computer backgrounds mixed with teaching at the college level, I shouldn't have any problem finding a district with a need for science teachers.

Five years ago when I left a computer job in Atlanta to move to a better job in Denver, I drove across country and took the back roads of Kansas to view the countryside. I mean, who else wants to see the backroads of Kansas, especially an ex Californian?

Passing thru Marysville, a small town in Northern Kansas along highway 36, I came upon a Catholic school along the route. And I said to myself that if it weren't for this computer job in Denver, I'd settle down here, right here - quite and peaceful. Now, it's about time I paid attention to those inner thoughts.

To blazes with the huge salary cut I'll be facing; because, I'll live longer as a teacher than as a type-A computer person.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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post #7 of 18
I've always wanted to call the manager into the kitchen and say, "here, hold this saute pan, I left something in my car."

Take the high road. Write a nice letter of resignation, you don't need to give them chapter and verse on why you are leaving, other career opportunities beckon, it's been a challenge and a pleasure to be part of the brigade, take pride in the work we have done here, yadda yadda. If there's anything I can do to help as part of a transition be happy to blah blah blah.

I've walked off of, or given short notice to more than my share of jobs. Take it from an ace bridge-burner. Be as professional as you know how to be. I've been invited back to jobs after someone I had a problem with left. Twice.
It's not Dairy Queen.
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It's not Dairy Queen.
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post #8 of 18

Coolness Counts

One person who was given notice of layoff, blew his stack and was immediately escorted out the door. Me, I took it cooly although shaken. A cool head is best. And now I can participate in the separation package and outplacement services that the company has to offer.

Furthermore, I'll get great references from my supervisor and manager; and, good references from IBM are certainly worth it.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #9 of 18
i agree with thebighat, i too have been an ace bridge burner in my time. the jobs i have liked and been unable to stay at have always given me wonderful references and would hire me back in a heartbeat - some have actually begged and bribed. you never know when you're going to need that reference, either.
mathew do you have another job to go to? sometimes it's best to have that lined up as the present job might tell you to take a hike.
just my .02.
kat
post #10 of 18
Lots of things come into play. I live in a "right to work" state. Basically, either party can terminate employment any time. So I know of cases where people give their notice and are out the door the next minute. Not saying this will happen to you, but don't stress over leaving earlier if they prefer it. Some places do, some for security issues for example. What your state law or union or employment contract state can be an issue. Look over any paperwork you signed when you started for details.

At the bottom line, it's none of their business why you don't want to work there. They can't make you tell them. You don't have to give them any reason at all. They'll surely ask though. And keeping positive is wise. But you can say almost anything positively.

If you don't want to go into it with them, you can leave it at "personal reasons". And don't talk trash with any co-workers. Word will get back.

Or

"I'm looking for a variety of experience in the industry before I apply to the CIA."

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #11 of 18

Ace non-bridge burner.

I've only burned one bridge and that was back in 1978. My second dishwashing job, and I gave them a 2 week notice. Well, the pay period ended one day before the date I told them I was leaving. Me being the dumb kid thought "what the heck, they won't miss me, and I won't have to wait 2 weeks for a couple of bucks, and I get an extra day off before starting my new job". Etc, etc, etc. I mean, how important in one dishwasher to a big restaurant like that one...
So a couple of days later the Sous chef who was a friend of mine stops by to give me the news. He got fired the night I didn't show up. It turns out that they had a busy night, and huge banquet for out of town dignitaries with a special menu. They were short-staffed anyway( it was on a Sunday) and they got slammed. Since I was the other dishwasher and I did'nt show up. the cooks had to do dishes. When the banquet arrived the Sous was doing dishes! The special menu got totally screwed up. The owner was furious! He ranted at my friend the Sous for the banquet fiasco, they got in a big argument and at the end he fired my friend! I have never since burned a bridge!
I won't say I was to blame for the mess-up, but me not showing up did'nt help the situation. Since then I have gotten more responsibility in my work and find that "notice" can take well over two weeks. Give your notice and stick to it. In the coming years when you are in charge, maybe your employees will treat you with the same respect.
What a relief! To find out after all these years that I'm not crazy. I'm just culinarily divergent...
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What a relief! To find out after all these years that I'm not crazy. I'm just culinarily divergent...
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post #12 of 18
Thread Starter 
Welp, I handed in my two weeks notice last night and I was told in no uncertain terms that unless I gave 6 to 8 weeks it was not acceptable and I wouldn't be able to use the place as a reference. Or in other words, if I only gave two weeks he would F*** me. He knows this is my only real experience in a restaurant and knew that telling me he would never recommend me would put him in a position of power. But for many reasons (all of them unchangable) I do need to leave there in two weeks.

So last night when I got home I thought about the fact that I've worked at least 2 hours of unpaid time every single day in that kitchen, the fact that I have asked multiple times for a letter of recommendation to the CIA but have never recieved it. (Mind you folks, I was named employee of the season at this restaurant last season). And now, because I can't give a long notice I'm told that I should never even think of trying to get a job in the fine dining restaurants in NYC. Even went as far as to start naming names of places that he wouldn't recommend me for (Thomas Keller came up, even though he is CA).

Needless to say I don't plan on ever going back there again.
post #13 of 18
Matthew, don't worry about what he said. You hurt his feelings, the poor guy. :rolleyes: In effect, you told him you didn't love him anymore. But you know what? He's blowing smoke.

First of all, most places, when called for a check on a previous employee, do very little more than confirm employment dates. They know that if they say much more they leave themselves open to lawsuits. You should definitely keep the place on your resume, including the award. When you interview elsewhere, you will be asked why you left: just tell the truth.

Second: there's a big difference between not recommending you, and badmouthing you to a prospective employer. He could only recommend you if he's asked; and if he's never done the letter you asked for, it's unlikely you would want to ask him anyway. And as for badmouthing you, see the paragraphs above.

Third: even though it means possibly wasting a couple of hours travel, I would not NOT show up for my next shift. If he didn't tell you "Never darken my door again" -- in other words, already FIRE YOU -- you should show up for work as scheduled. For all you know, he may have had a change of heart. Or he might fire you now. But more important, NOT SHOWING UP IS BAD FORM and that will get around.

Last: you need to keep up more with industry news. Keller will, in fact, be opening a place in NYC. But does your (soon-to-be-former) boss really know him well enough to waste a conversation on trashing you to him?
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #14 of 18
its interesting to note that an employer would react that way. Im not familiar with the custom and practice of giving notice in the US. However, here in Aus, it seems customary to give notice based on the amount of leave given, i.e. full time workers give 4 weeks notice and casuals (because in a legal sense, the work contract is renewed shift by shift) can give as little as 1 hours notice.

Another potential downfall for the employer, especially if they bad mouth you in a telephone reference, is that they are running the risk of being liable for the tort of dafamation.

After all, it would seem that your employer is engaging in blackmail in a vain attempt to retain you.
"Nothing quite like the feeling of something newl"
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"Nothing quite like the feeling of something newl"
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post #15 of 18
Thread Starter 
<<Last: you need to keep up more with industry news. Keller will, in fact, be opening a place in NYC. But does your (soon-to-be-former) boss really know him well enough to waste a conversation on trashing you to him?>>

Didn't know that, but yes, the boss knows Keller pretty well apparently.

<<Third: even though it means possibly wasting a couple of hours travel, I would not NOT show up for my next shift. If he didn't tell you "Never darken my door again" -- in other words, already FIRE YOU -- you should show up for work as scheduled. For all you know, he may have had a change of heart. Or he might fire you now. But more important, NOT SHOWING UP IS BAD FORM and that will get around.>>

I just called and said I wouldn't be at work today. Honestly right now it's an incredibly hostile work environment and not worth the time or effort. I put in more than a year of ball breaking work and then I'm told that it was all for nothing (And yes, my primary goal of working there was to get a letter of recommendation to the CIA as well as get some experience). Now I have neither because my notice was shorter than he wanted. This is incredibly disheartening. The two other cooks that closed with me last night (the three of us are the only cooks that have been there more than a year) were pretty amazed at hearing what happened and said it was total bull. Both said they wouldn't blame me in the least if I never came back, because they both know how hard I've worked there.

The funniest thing is just a month ago the Chef was telling me how he would recommend me to work in any other kitchen, including The French Laundry.
post #16 of 18
You're going to hear, and be able to discern, all manner of bs over the years in the food business. Lines like" Work here for a year and you can get a job anywhere....." BS, as far as I'm concerned. Ditto with what this guy is pulling..."You'll never work in this town again. I'm badmouthing you all over the continent."
He's nothing if not grandiose. Nothing comes to stay, it all comes to pass, and so will the next two weeks. If you continue to go to work, and they pull something funny, call the labor board in your state, tell them on the way out you'll see them at the unemployment hearing. I always thought the amount of notice given was equal to your pay period, at certain levels, and restaurant cooks are not, in spite of what we all dream, quite at the level where one is required to give 6-8 weeks so that management can start a global search for a line cook. They can tell you they don't need you anymore, and I don't know if I'd sweat the references either. Most chefs know if you know what you're doing a fraction of the way into your first shift on a new job. Your skills, your talent, your creativity, your personality, would land you a better job faster than any letter from this maroon.


An oh yeah,..Nick.shu...leave? You mean like vacation?:lol: :lol:
It's not Dairy Queen.
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It's not Dairy Queen.
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post #17 of 18
yeah in Aus it pretty much customary to give about 4 weeks notice. I had judged that on how much annual leave given in the standard job (vis a vis "vacation"), as the notice period generally matches the amount of vacation given in one year.

Casual labour is or can be the exception, as it is a contract of labour renewed by period of pay by period of pay.

"In most Industrial Instruments (awards) casual staff do not have access to notices of termination, severance pays, annual leave, payment in lieu of notice of termination, personal leave rights, parental leave and public holiday. Because the employee is hired by the hour, notices and dispensation of hire are also by the hour. The basis of hourly notice is in effect negated by the calculation of 1/38 of a standard weekly pay appended with a 20% loading, designed to offset any disadvantage. However, the application of a definition of a casual is certain to change due to the over emphasis of their use. The trades union movement is pushing to have the casual status of a worker redefined. This means that the current practice of using casuals to completely control labour costs maybe subject to stricter controls.

Historically, the casual worker arose out of a need for an hourly type of worker, for short-term work, which arose due to short-term work requirements out of emergencies (a good example is emergency dock work) and a short fall in man power (incomplete rosters due to sickness etc)."
"Nothing quite like the feeling of something newl"
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"Nothing quite like the feeling of something newl"
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post #18 of 18
Here is some good news: all is not lost. Even though it is customary and desirable to work out your notice, you can still have a great career if you leave this guy in the dust. I know this has to hurt, though. I can just imagine all the hard work you put into this, and then to feel betrayed by the Chef's actions! But he appears to lack integrity.

Here is my reasoning:

I am gathering this Chef is good. Very good. And also that he is a bit of a prima donna. And he is obviously well known. So if he is all of these things, there is a big chance that most other chefs around him know this.

It means they also know that if you can work a year for him, then you are worth something. You know something, and you can stand pressure and rapid pacing. I had an employee come to me giving his 2 weeks notice. He went to go work for a Chef at the Ritz. He hired my employee on the spot and waived the interviews - told him that if he could work for me, he could work for anyone. He had worked for me for 1.5 years. Other Chefs will see this on your resume also - you can do the job.

And if they don't know him, his recommendation or lack of it won't mean a thing.

Professionalism is important, please don't get me wrong. But from being on the hiring end for at least 10+ years, let me tell you that if I needed a decent cook who could handle pressure and had some basic understanding of high end cuisine, and I knew they had lasted in a place with a good reputation more than a few months, I would hire them.

I am typing fast, I hope this came out right.
Laurie
Married into the Devil Dogs
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Married into the Devil Dogs
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