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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've used arrowroot powder from the health food store with great success in thickening sauces, etc.

But...............just bought some from the Indian grocery store (named 'arraroot', but since there's lots of translation misspellings figured it was the same thing); it cost about 1/4 the price of the HFS powder, and I thought I was getting a great bargain!

Until - I used it to try and thicken some chicken stock for a gravy; did what I always do - scraped up the browned bits with some white wine, let that reduce, then added the stock and brought it up to a boil. Then, with whisk at the ready, slowly poured the slurry of the 'arraroot' and water into the boiling stock, whisking to get it distributed and blended. Well. I ended up with a mess of stringy looking globs (not unlike - well, I won't go there), and no thickening at all.

Ended up straining it all out and doing my tried and true cornstarch slurry.

Any ideas if the 'arraroot' powder is the same thing as arrowroot?
 

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'arraroot' is corn flour...not corn starch!

I use that in a batter preparation for Pakora or Pakorha.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Kimmie - Whatever it was I used DID thicken like cornstarch or arrowroot - it just thickened in these thick, mucousy looking (sorry for the image!) strands, instead of blending with the liquid. I use Besan flour (bean flour) when I do pakoras - which I love!!! Have you ever taken a whole spinach leaf, dipped it in the batter and fried it? Scrumptious!!!
 

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Marm,

Spinach is so underrated! I haven't tried a spinach leaf dipped in batter...but I will. Besan flour makes great Pakhoras. I'm sorry I don't know more about arraroot. I guess I'll hit the old books next weekend! :)
 

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When you say it's corn flour, do you mean it's finely ground cornmeal or cornstarch? In the UK and some other countries, cornflour = cornstarch, but, in the US, I think it might be finely ground cornmeal.

I'm pretty sure that in Indian recipes, the cornflour = cornstarch since it's used for thickening or lightening a batter. I have seen recipes that say "arrowroot or cornflour." I don't think cornmeal and arrowroot would be interchangeable since cornmeal isn't a very good thickener.

Here's a link to why marmalady may have had the stringy results: Stringy arrowroot. Scroll down to the bottom of the page to the Chef's Tip.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Ah-Hah! Thanks, Risa - Maybe I just used too much, although it certainly reacted differently than cornstarch does when you use to much; cornstarch stays blended, it just gets very thick. This - literally - ended up in stringy blobs. Looked like someone - oh, never mind. Thanks again!!!
 

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marmalady,

Look here for information on thickeners. I think you'll find it extremely informative. Alternative starches are good for people on very specific diets or those who may have allergies to particular ingredients. Each has their own attributes and it should not be assumed that they are all used alike.

:)
 

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Cchiu,

ShawtyCat is right:

Arraroot is corn flour. She was not referring to Arrowroot at all!

The only application I'm aware of for Arraroot is in batters for Pakhora, as I mentioned earlier in this thread. Again, I wish I found more info on Arraroot.
 
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