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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi to all and thanks in advance.

I usually make pancakes using the King Arthur basic pancake recipe. Rumford baking powder is used for rising; it's a non-aluminum based baking powder.
Well, this time I switched to Calumet brand baking powder - aluminum based. I tested its activity in a glass of water. It fizzed. My pancakes, however, did not rise as high as it usually does with Rumford brand. I think that I'll stay with Rumford baking powder for the higher rise.
Any of you ever had similar experiences with either of those baking powders? :confused:
 

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Kokopuffs, I have also switched from Calumet. I was disappointed in the last can I bought and switched to Rumfords a while back. My product seems to have better rising action. Unfortuntely, when I was home, my mom had Calumet and I was severly disappointed in the end result. Have you tried the baking powder that Kin Arthur sells? I couldn't see any appreciable difference from Rumford. Maybe it was just me? :confused:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Nope, I don't have any experience with KA baking powder.
 

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I go thru 5# foodservice can of Calumet in 2-3 weeks without a problem. Then again, I have not tried Rumford. Is there a difference in the action(double acting vs. single acting)perhaps?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Angrychef:

Both are double acting. Calumet is aluminum based. Some people fear aluminum since it accumulates at certain foci in the brain of Alzheimer's patients. If aluminum were a problem, we'd see a quick demise of "military intelligence" since all the recruits are fed food prepared in aluminum utensils.

Rumford is not aluminum based, offering an alternative to the double acting, aluminum based baking powder. Do give Rumford a chance; you may be delighted with the results. :)
 

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Double acting bp starts to make gas when you make the batter wet, then finishes when heated. About 25% of its action occurs in the first stage, which is why you can sometimes get a lighter cake by leaving it on the counter for a while before baking it.

Single acting starts to make gas when it gets wet and keeps right on going. Got to put it in the oven right away.
 
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