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I’m getting a bit confused as to the goal. If not interested in smoking and still want low+slow it might be just as well to us a conventional oven at 250 degF and put the meat in covered roasting pan.

That’s how I do pulled pork shoulder/butt and beef brisket during inclement weather and it works for ribs too. I cheat and use a bit of the dreaded liquid smoke sometimes. Never tried that technique with chicken, probably for good reason.

An option to consider and if your not interested I won’t be offended.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
I’m getting a bit confused as to the goal. If not interested in smoking and still want low+slow it might be just as well to us a conventional oven at 250 degF and put the meat in covered roasting pan.

That’s how I do pulled pork shoulder/butt and beef brisket during inclement weather and it works for ribs too. I cheat and use a bit of the dreaded liquid smoke sometimes. Never tried that technique with chicken, probably for good reason.

An option to consider and if your not interested I won’t be offended.
Point well-made! If I put it in my cast iron enamel Dutch Oven Covered the result would be the same.
Do you add fluid to the pan. Or perhaps another pan filled with water in the oven below. Or that will not do anything to alter the cooking process?
 

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Do you add fluid to the pan. Or perhaps another pan filled with water in the oven below. Or that will not do anything to alter the cooking process?
I do slow and low in the oven all the time (I'm about to put in some pork ribs right this minute). No fluid this time, just lay them marinated on a sheet and cook for 3 hours at around 130 C. Sometimes I add some fluid to the pan but never in another pan.
 

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No added liquid, except whatever iss desired for flavoring. The meat will exude enough on its own. I dry rub, rest overnight in refrigerator, and (despite some folk’s concerns with this part of the technique) put it in the oven for an overnight slow cooking. Next morning, pull and prepare for lunch or dinner. Only complaint so far is that the good smells makes sleeping difficult.
 

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I don’t do much beef and haven’t done one in oven for a while. brisket is when I fire up the smoker or braise it “Jewish style” at higher temp and shorter time (edited for accuracy) on stovetop.

A 5-7lb pork butt at 250F is generally at pulling temp (205 or so) after 12 hours.

Ribs, spare or baby back, don’t need the extended time in oven so I cook them during the day they are to be consumed.
 

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There are smoker BBQ grills that use a separate firebox that is thermostat controlled. Meaning that your meat is cooked with heat and smoke at a specific temperature for however long you wish.
The thermostat controls a fan and vents that control airflow and heat.

They are not exactly inexpensive...but they are very precise.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Oh ok... that seems like a lot for overnight? I did beef at 212F for 5 hours and it was fork tender. Guess it depends on the oven, the beef, the recipe etc.... or maybe it's not beef? Have you found that you need a different temp for beef vs pork?
I don’t do much beef and haven’t done one in oven for a while. brisket is when I fire up the smoker or braise it “Jewish style” at higher temp and shorter time (edited for accuracy) on stovetop.

A 5-7lb pork butt at 250F is generally at pulling temp (205 or so) after 12 hours.

Ribs, spare or baby back, don’t need the extended time in oven so I cook them during the day they are to be consumed.
A four pound pork but needs how long?
 

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Probably 10 hours, maybe 11 to get over 190 and into a good pulling temp. You’ll know it’s done when the bone pulls out easily with tongs.

At that point I let it cool a bit for easier handling then pull the pork and separate out fat blobs and skin. The meat gets put back into the pan juices. When serving I often embellish with a glob of Trader Joe’s barbecue sauce (if I didn’t make my own) and cole slaw. On a toasted bun you’ll hear moans of delight. On a plate with cole slaw and potato salad, or white beans, or baked/barbecue beans or… you’ll hear the same.

I like to make it ahead. Like many stews the flavor seems better after resting.
 

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Which models do you have in mind? I'm interested. :)
The ones I am the most familiar with are ones built by friends of mine who are into welding and etc. They require a forklift to move as they may have wheels but weigh a couple of tons (4,000+ lbs or 2200kg)

I'm sure my friends (who also enter BBQ competitions) would be glad to make one for someone else for $$. But shipping would be all on you. That's going to be a lot of BBQ.

However....my friends might be handy with plate steel and welders...but they aren't really that bright....I'm sure that someone out there sells one that burns wood and have the controls as I've described. Probably even one made in China that is smaller and cheaper.

I'll look for some pictures and diagrams and see what I can find.

Here's one similar.

 

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I was equally curious. Lowe’s (a local chain hardware store) has several electric smokers that do temp control. Prices about 300-500USD. Tempting, especially since they will temp control down to about 100F, which allows cold smoking too. The top heat range seems to be 275F so it’s always going to be low and slow. :)

The one you linked seems very versatile.
 

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As for your question about water pans;
I sometimes use the waterpan empty, if I want higher temp, but indirect heat, sometimes with water to reduce heat and keep temp more stable, esp for longer cooks and sometimes I take it out.
It then behaves more like a pit barrel cooker and you get flare up's from dripping grease. But because the meat is high above the fire, it doesn't burn.
I can recommend the wsm (I got the baby size), but have no experience with the other.

You might want to have a look at the amazing rib's website
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
Probably 10 hours, maybe 11 to get over 190 and into a good pulling temp. You’ll know it’s done when the bone pulls out easily with tongs.

At that point I let it cool a bit for easier handling then pull the pork and separate out fat blobs and skin. The meat gets put back into the pan juices. When serving I often embellish with a glob of Trader Joe’s barbecue sauce (if I didn’t make my own) and cole slaw. On a toasted bun you’ll hear moans of delight. On a plate with cole slaw and potato salad, or white beans, or baked/barbecue beans or… you’ll hear the same.

I like to make it ahead. Like many stews the flavor seems better after resting.
Do you bake it in the oven covered with foil or open?
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
That is what I did foil. My result was not so good. Meat was not tender did not shred easy. Should I have elevated the meat, so it was out of the fluid? It did give off a fair amount of juice.
 
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