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The main thing to remember is: use a wine that's drinkable. Doesn't have to be the best of the best, but it should be one you could drink. (That's why "cooking wines" AREN'T.) And I'm with Kuan -- whatever table wine I used it to make the dish, I like to drink it with the food.

Do you mean that sucks the air OUT of the bottle? In any case, I've never seen a need for one of those; if I have part of a bottle left over, I just transfer it to a smaller bottle or jar. I usually use it (cook with or drink) within a day or two, anyway. Yes, there is some degradation, but not so much as to make the wine unusable.

The only exception to that is . . . sherry. We keep a bottle of fino or manzanilla in the fridge all the time, mostly to have as an aperitif. It's usually finished within a week to ten days. Keeps just fine.

The main difference using cream sherry is, of course, that it will make the dish sweet. If that's all right with you, sure, use it. But if you don't want that added sugar, stick with a dry sherry. This is one case where I find that an inexpensive, domestic "sherry" works all right for cooking , even though I personally would not drink it.
 

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Well, I will continue to be a curmudgeon and say that the only benefits of all those "wine keeper" gizmos are the profits into the makers' pockets.

I look at it this way: if I'm opening a really, really good bottle of wine, it will only be for drinking and I will want to finish it then. If it's just one of my everyday "house wines" that I'm using to cook with, I know that it can stand a day or two in the fridge in a smaller container to remain drinkable, or longer to still be all right for cooking. If it's plonk, I wouldn't have it in the house in any case, so it doesn't matter how well it might keep.

So why should I spend money for a canister of gas or piece of rubber or metal that does nothing I can't do with what I've already got hanging around? That just doesn't make sense to my, um, frugal self. Oh, all right, cheap -- but not when it comes to the actual wine.
 

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Jock and Cape Codder make a very good point: dry vermouth works well, and it keeps well without refrigeration. Sometimes, a screwtop is just the thing~ :D
 
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