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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all. Made boeuf bourguignon the other day and noticed it was sour. Is it suppose to be sour? I added some fat and a little sugar and got it nice. Problem is ive never tasted a propoer boeuf bourguignon before. So dont know what its suppose to taste like. Didnt make it with burgund wine. Reduced wine by 50% and braised in that for 2 hours.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Somehow my posts on this thread are still waiting moderator approval. So dont know when you guys will see this.

Ruby Cabernet wine

Wine was good, tasted before. Did not use stock. I cooked it in 50% reduced wine.
 

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Always difficult to answer without being able to taste.
You say it tasted good after adding a little sugar, so I think we can rule out it being off.
Most likely the wine like the others said as well.
What was your recipe?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yes it tasted better with a little sugar to cut down on the acidity. But problem is i dont know how much acidic it should taste, and im guessing from your answers that it should not be to acidic?

If its the wine thats the problem, wouldnt just adding the sugar be the same thing as finding a sweeter wine?

Recipe is pretty simple, braising meat in redwine reduced by 50%. Got the recipe from a cookbook written by a former 2 star michelin chef. Who swears to this recipe
 

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Don't use a sweet wine.
I don't find boeuf bourgignon sour. If anything maybe a bit salty/intense due to the reduced wine. I tend to use half water, half dry red wine and then reduce.
I was asking for the recipe to see if there was anything else in it that could cause it to be sour. And while I write this, maybe what I describe as salty/intense could be described as tart?
I think you'll have to order boeuf bourgignon in a restaurant, or maybe even as a ready meal and compare?
 

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When doing reductions of alcoholic beverages there is a scientific reason why.

Alcohol has a very low boiling and evaporation temperature. (Ever try to freeze vodka or scotch solid?)

Water is next on the temperature it will vaporize at....212F for most....lower or higher depending upon elevation.

Acids are dead last...in fact most acids are concentrated by boiling. Try reducing pure vinegar and see if anyone can breathe in the vicinity.

So if a wine reduction is leaving your foods a bit on the sour side then reduce them to a more syrupy state before introducing them to espagnole/demiglace sauce...

Since you mentioned the additional sugar seems to have fixed the issue it could be that your mirepoix was out of balance. 50% onions is the standard with the remaining split evenly with carrots and celery. Both onions and carrots are naturally high in sugars....

Then there's the finishing of the sauce. Beef Marrow. Beef marrow is high fat...added after the addition of raw butter to the sauce. Both the butter and the marrow will cut the acidity of the sauce tremendously.
I understand that in today's low fat, carb free, gluten free, vegan society that these things aren't exactly viewed with relish...but they are what gives this particular dish its flavor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I wasnt talking about sweet wine, meant just that it wasnt a burgund.

I made it pretty classic, added some sauted mushrooms and onions last 30min of cooking(180min total) Thats it. So used no mirepoix. Added carrots only on the plating, as per instructions.

Its very sad i know of no place with this on the menu in my area. Its not really common here in Norway at all with french bistros. Such a shame. Gonna try a ready made meal with it.

Used chuck as meat
 

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Sorry @Thenun : it's just whenever I see sweet and red wine in one sentence, I get goose skin ;)
By the sounds of it you did everything right.
There are always a lot of different ways to make something.
So sorry you can't send us a taster..
Just thinking: did you ever make coq au vin and ran into the same issue?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Haha yes me too. Especially when i hear rumors of added sugar.

Been years since i made coq au vin, but when you mention it memories starts resurfacing. I belive that also tasted very sour. Made with the same method of reducing wine 50%, recipe from the same chef. But the idiotic thing is that it was the same wine.

I might just go and grab some burgund wine and try to make it with that. Even tho that wine is incredible overpriced here at the moment, as its popularity have skyrocket recently
 

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I was taught, and have always made, beef bourgignon using beef stock in addition to red wine. The ratio was roughly 1/1. Not using stock, would definitely bring the wine to the forefront of the flavor profile in a knockout punch. I believe this is what is causing your reaction. It doesn't mean that the wine used was wrong or off, but that the flavor of wine is too strong and pronounced for your tastes. Using stock, as well as wine, gives your taste buds additional things to focus on rather than a knockout punch of wine.
 

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Sauerbraten is sour...it's good but sour. Personally, I wouldn't leave the wine so unreduced...reduce it down to syrup alone and then reconstitute it with beef stock or demi glace.
You get the wine taste but without so much of the acids.
And as far as the wine...use cheap but drinkable red wine.
 

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I typically do not like the sour that dry wines produce, and always add a little sugar. Read wine to almost cover (alcohol boiled off first), tbls.+ sugar, celery seed, beef bouillon concentrate, sage, burnt carrot coins, onions as you like them, S+P, and garlic near the end. Simple and can't go wrong with that.
 

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I was trained to make beef bourgignon and have always done so with red wine and beef stock. The proportion was about 1/1. Absence of stock would undoubtedly give the wine a powerful punch in the flavour profile. I think this is what's setting off your response. It just means that the wine's flavour is too strong and obvious for your liking, not that the wine was bad or off. Instead of a wine knockout punch, using stock together with wine offers your taste buds something to focus on.
 
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