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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My question is this.
We were discussing braising in class, and how it is enjoying a new popularity in kitchens across the U.S.
What are you all doing in your kitchens as far as braising is concerned? And are you doing it the modern way, or do your guests have the time to enjoy the traditional way?
Thanks
Frizbee
 

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I don't think braising ever went out of style in restaurants.

This is probably my favorite way to cook.

Braising affords the chef an oppurtunity to be creative with lesser cuts of meat(which helps the bottom line).But braising isn't only relegated to meats,certian vegetables and even seafood enjoy a nice swim in broth.I love braised endive for example.

Ofcourse eye rounds,lamb shanks,veal shanks,veal breast,pheasant legs and thighs,lamb shoulder,goose necks,knuckle face etc are still being braised all over.

What do you mean by "Do your guests have the time to enjoy the traditional way"?

Anyway,Happy braising.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well from what i understand and correct me if i am wrong, please; braising used to be done to order...then the modern way, from what i gather is to cook it off prior to open, and just keep it heated so that you can more efficiently expidite the order. I am told that when we had the whole, dinner as an event sort of dining service, people were consuming several courses of food over a more lengthy period of time, so chefs were able to begin a braise and complete it to order, in the time it took for the soup, app, and salad courses to be consumed.
am i being given proper info?
so modern would be cooked off prior to service, and the traditional way is made to order, in answer to your question.
i was told the switch was due to people wanting quicker service times, not really wanting to hang out waiting for food.
frizbee
 

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Frizbee,

Braising is not done "ala minute" The whole concept of braising is slow,long cooking to break down the sinue and muscle tissues.

I think you may be recieving incorrect imformation.
 

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The only "modern" touch I can think of is the use of sous vide technology: after the batch of braised food is cooked, individual portions are vacuum-packed in plastic bags (aka Cryovac) and refrigerated, then reheated in their bags at service. From what I've seen of it (in the kitchen at Artisanal), it's great for both the restaurant and the customer. Waste is minimized, perfect portrion control, no burning the food or cooking the sauce down too much over the course of service.

But that's just an application of new technology to improve a process that's been in use for a long time.
 

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This is my 1000th post.

Sure guests have time to enjoy a good old fashioned a la minute (more like a la hours) braised shank, but they may have to wait till the 8th course! :)

In a restaurant, braised dishes are either cooked and held, or cooked, separated from the braising liquid, and reheated to order. I've never used sous-vide technique like Suzanne describes, I'm too lazy to even portion pasta. :) Sounds like it would work perfect for this kind of application.

BTW, would you all agree that curries are technically braised?

Kuan
 

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Well...my first question...define "modern" brasing. It's right up there with the concept of a "new classic" (I've heard at least one chef use that line !)

As for braising itself...well any monkey can grill a steak, but braising, that takes skill!

Braised Short Ribs over Filet Mignon? ANYDAY!
 

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Here in the Denver area with its mile-high elevation, braising short ribs to where they fall off of the bone takes overnight - at least 9 to 12 hours braising time. A really slow cooking process.
 

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Sure kuan, I would agree that curries are a braise. Curries are really nothing more than an Indian "stew" and a stew is a braise, though it usually contains more liquid than a standard braise.

BTW, no one has made mention of the best braise there is. Braised Lamb Shanks. Sure short ribs rock also, but there is nothing better than slowly braised lamb shanks with root vegetables and then set over buttery mashed potatoes with the reduced braising liquid spooned over top. We are talking heavenly. Oh, man...I just made myself really hungary!!! Must stop drooling over the keyboard and find something to eat!!! Later all!:p :p
 

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my favorite braise in the world is an osso buco, veal , lamb or pork,, either way. nothing can compare to the flavorfull meat provided by the slow braising of the meaty bone. as far as service is concerned, the customer is not used to seeing a raw veal shank before it is slowly braised in liquid,,, therefore would not begin to trully appreciate the work that goes into a "true" braise. when doing bucco i simply cook the meat until it is just away from done, cool and hold. sure it may take 45 minutes to carefully bring it to doneness while apps and salads are being enjoyed,,, but i don't know many chefs even that prefer to wait 3 solid hours for the main course, no matter how fresh it is.
 
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