Chef Forum banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've never eaten liver before, but I'm going to start.

I believe I have a vitamin B12 deficiency and my toddler definitly has low iron and won't take the nasty tasting supplements (I can't blame him, it tastes like strong metal). In doing research into anemia and B12 deficiency I've learned that the best food sources for these important vitamins is calves liver. From what I uderstand a 4oz portion gives you 600% of your RDA, so I think if I eat 2oz a day we'll have pleanty.

I buy my beef in bulk from a local farmer who has 100% grass fed animals who are raised completely naturally. I thought the reason people do not eat mature beef liver is because of the toxins in these animals. Is there a taste/tenderness difference? Do you think toxins would build up in these animals anyways, even though they are healthy animals, raised in a humane and responsible manner? Do you think the beef liver has lower vitamin content than the calves liver?

Anyone have any ideas on how I can make this liver appeal to my 3yr old? I probably need to hide it in his food.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
amazingrace;258137 said:
Mature beef liver has a stronger flavor, which many people find unpleasant. In addition, the texture of older liver can be kind of "mushy" (for lack of a better description). Baby beef or calf's liver tastes "clean", since fewer toxins have been filtered through this organ in the younger animals. Many youngsters do not care for liver, not only because of the taste, but also because the texture is unfamiliar to them. However, your child may surprise you. When my son was about a year or so old, he developed a taste for liver, and continues to enjoy it today (he's 41 now). The key is in the preparation. It should be nicely browned outside, but still kind of pink in the middle. The more well done you make it, the stronger the taste becomes, and the texture changes from tender to leathery. Since you have not eaten liver yourself, I suggest your first experience should be without your son looking on, in case it does not appeal to you. Whenever I make liver, I serve it smothered with nicely caramelized onions, and nice brown gravy with mushrooms. My family enjoys mashed potatoes and green beans for the side dishes. I hope you do well with this. Properly prepared, liver is very tasty.

By the way, since you believe you have some nutritional issues, you should consult your family doctor and peditrician to be sure there is not some other condition(s) interferring with the absorption of vitamins. This is especially important with your toddler, because of the vital role that good nutrition plays in brain function in the very young.[/quote]

I TOTALLY agree with you. However, I'm having a hard time finding a doctor that will talk nutrition. They test the iron and say take a supplement, they never want to talk about food. Even the testing for B12 defiency is not always done correctly, and a doctor might not identify me as deficient, but as borderline (which can still cause problems that I am experiencing like fatigue, chronic head ache, and spots at times in my vision). I'm always dismissed as being slightly anemic and this has been going on since I was a teen. I'm going to make an appointment with an internist (who does not take insurance at all, due to her popularity) who does LOTS of bloodwork and focuses on diet and nutrients. She is an MD, but believes strongly in the mind/body/diet connection.

I'm trying to provide the "optimal" brain development diet for my toddler. We are eating a diet rich in Omega 3s fats and keeping the Omega 6 fats in check. This means lots of fish, avocado, and grass fed beef. I think I can get him to eat the liver, as I got him to eat sardines just last week.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top