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....Please feel free to ask questions. I currently run a small catering business.
....because me personally I don't run a catering business, so I wouldn't know exactly how much to charge at this point...
Uhhhhhh? What?
And everyone's definition of a chef is different
Nope. A Chef is just a boss of other cooks. AKA Sous-Chef, Chef de Cuisine, Executive Chef, etc...

Pretty standard definition across the board but many americans use the term incorrectly to describe a cook who works in finer cuisine. IMO, this is mostly because of reality TV shows from recent years and their misuse of the term and TV "Chefs" who call themselves "Chefs" even if they have no crew to run nor have ever supervised a crew of cooks. Americans also have some sort of aversion to the term "cook" as if it is only used as a job title for fast food cooks.
 

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To answer the question at hand. The simplest answer is to determine how much of a portion each person is estimated at eating and multiply that amount by the amount of guests are attending. Find the weight of each type of food you are preparing that the average person will put on their plate and when you multiply that number with your guests, the amount of food you will need will be apparent. Add an extra 5-10% to be safe. You will also need to know your cost by weight of each ingredient used. If you want to determine how much you should charge your client, the simplest way (but not always the best way due to obvious complications) would be to find your total food cost based on those numbers and times that by 3 to set a price. 

I'm sure if you do search for Pete's posts, as was advised, you will find many more eloquently and more detailed answers, as Pete's posts were basically some of the best education I have received on the subject. That's the simplest way to answer OP's question though. 
 

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Right, I agree 100%, which is why I added the caveat emptor part. I was merely trying to simplify the most very basic way to come up with a price for the first time someone caters a function. It sounds like the OP has never priced an event before. I did not want to make his head spin. I think when you add in all the factors that we consider when you get into the advanced side of pricing an event, newbies tend to nod off. I think the "times 3 rule" is good for most first timers to price a basic event and then later on when they wonder why they didn't make any money, they can delve into the whole-really-making-money-being-a-chef thing, like Pete did (and a few of us do).

Surely, the OP is not opening his own catering company at this moment... He is just dipping his toes in the water. 

Great advice though, Meez. Soon, I may start to ask a few of these advanced pricing type questions that Pete was so good at answering, as I may be awarded a big contract in the near future that will put me back in the hotseat of foodservice business ownership/management. 
 
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