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Have 2 of my fathers cleavers. F Dick #100 and was easy to find info on. The other. Obscure name

D. Z. Kobylanski Few hunting knives, but not much else.

Has some staining. No rust. Just spotty. No plan on using it (use the F. Dick for chopping). Just want to clean it up

Thanks

DON
 

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European cleavers have a very limited usage in the kitchen: tradionally, they have a rounded edge, allowing them to go through bones without causing splintering.
Very different from the thin Chinese cleavers or their Japanese equivalents who are used for general purposes, just as a chef's knife or a gyuto.
 

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I was out of town this past weekend, and when I got back, I found a box on my porch. It was addressed to me, but the return address was unfamiliar. I opened it up and found this old cleaver inside. It's rusty and dirty, and the handle is falling off. It's obviously been abandoned for a long time. I have no idea where this cleaver came from, or what it was used for. But I'm going to clean it up and try to find out. Has anyone ever heard of the name on the return address? I'm curious to know more about it.
 

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Back during the turn of the century (1900's) Sheffield was hit and miss for the steel industry.

It was always feast or famine for work.

A lot of guys would group together their last paychecks, buy some steel, tools, and coal and make all sorts of things from razors to various cutlery pieces to sell them off for profit...just trying to stay gainfully employed.

A few such groups of guys became noteworthy but most just evaporated.

A unknown cleaver could be from one of these groups. I have a straight razor from one such group here across the pond. Excellent vintage razor I still use.

Clean it up, put on a new handle and give it something to chew up. I'd dare say that it will be good steel and work nicely for you.
 
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