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There are a few very good books on the use of tea in food and cooking. They seem to be easier to find in bookstores that feature books on Asian and Asian American literature. Coffee, I am not so sure about as I am more of a tea drinker than a coffee drinker (plus I'm not into fancy schmancy coffee drinks). But with every yuppie facination comes paraphernalia, books being amongst them. There should be a plethora of information in magazines currently on tea as it is being touted as an underestimated (at least in the Western world) beneficial brew. So as soon as the band wagon comes around...

I agree that there is a lot of potential with tea. It's a great alternative to wine for teatotalers (sp?) because of it's complexities, tannins (can be subdued or accentuated), etc. In the US. We mostly enjoy it iced. But I am talkingabout hot teas for good quality (though I am as well stocked with bagged and $90/lb teas). Actually, I don't understand why more restaurants do not feature non-alcoholic drink menus more often. They are probably even cheaper to produce (which would mean a wide profit margin).

Kuan, I know what you are taking about. I forgot the name, but that contraption works on the science of air pressure. When the flame goes out, the coffee is siphoned back into the receptacle because a vacuum had been created. I had a cup of coffee made in that thing years ago at Ray's Cafe in Philadelphia (it was located on 8th Street south of Race Street). I don't know if it's there still. But it was very good cuppa coffee. I still prefer drip method.
 
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