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There is an ongoing theme here...no salt until the end.

As you reduce any salt will become kinda in your face but if this happens just make another small batch and marry the two.

Another pearl here...the darker you get the roux the less thickening power you will get.

mimi
... I've found it interesting that so far its been salt only at the end, or perhaps no salt at all. I'm assuming that FF uses salt but didn't mention it because it is a given. :)

But had I chime in earlier I would have mentioned that I always salt mushroom when sautéing to help drive the water out.

One piece of information missing from this discussion that would drive me to one or another of the three vey valid techniques is when the sauce is to be prepared. Are we talking a home dinner, high-volume diner/cafeteria, or fine dining environment?

And not intending to be offensive... but the sauce in the picture looks like it could be packaged.
 

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If you want a light(er) colored sauce then you need to stay away from the pan drippings (fond) or darker roux. Both will give you a brown sauce. Personally, for a home meal I use the fond and make a brown sauce in the manner described by FF. It will be very flavorful. Totally impress your guests by adding a pinch of fresh herb like thyme (as in your picture) or tarragon perhaps... and at the end a light flurry of minced parsley.

A whiter sauce can be make with a light roux/béchamel technique but not using the pan drippings/fond. It won't have a very intense taste other than the mushroom/herbs you use. There's a time and place for that (think Swedish meatball sauce) but I'd rather a blast of chicken flavor in my sauce.
 
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