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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I love Tamarind,

I make a ketchup,broth for lobster,green mango and tamirind chutney for venison ETC,
What about you?
 

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I hope so much things work out better this year. I can't wait to meet you and eat at your place! In turn you shall have the pleasure of my company:rolleyes:
We're supposed to go to Calif. this summer but I still like the idea of a trip to Connecticut for you, Mich and my cousin.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Chrose I love your sence of humor!!!You always put a smile on my face :)
Well I would be honored to have youe company.
Any time my friend.

BTW...What do you do with Tamarind ?
cc
 

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I've recently discovered this wonderful fruit. Based on recipes from Hot, Sour, Salty, Sweet I've been learning a bit about southeast Asian cooking.
I've used tamarind pulp in broths for hot pots and some delicious noodle dishes. I think it gives Pad Thai the most genuine flavor.
 

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Make a glaze for roasted cornish game hens (or chicken), with tamarind, brown sugar, and 5 spice powder. Use glaze the last 30 minutes of roasting. Num, Num!
 

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Actually, CC, I mentioned this to you a few weeks ago...
My family, being of Syrian background, uses a lot of tamarind (the condiment is lovingly referred to as 'oo-', kinda like a choking sound. )

It's sometimes used in a sauce for stuffed grape leaves, or mixed into ground lamb as a topping for lahmajean; a sort of meat pizza.

Yum...I have some in my fridge right now...
 

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What does tamarind taste like? Is it something you can omit in a recipe or does it carry all the flavour?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Tamarind has a cooked apricot flavor, with sweet spice notes.

If a recipe calles for tamarind it really would be missed if omited.
If you are in a pinch,soak some dried apricots until soft, then purre. This will mimic the flavor and texture to a certain degree
cc
 

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Thanks CChiu and CC for all the info. I'll have to go sjhop for exotic ingredients and spices. I've decided to get into Indian cooking.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
This is great news Isa,

Indian food is so simply, it's complex.
You will find a whole new world of flavors,textures and aromas.
cc
 

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Isa will do great, I will walk her through the basics! :lips:
 

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Hi Everyone,

Tamarind has a unique taste that you'd miss when taken away. I work for a company that process tamarind for sauces. They are intending to export the product to Europe and the USA. Tamarind is widely used in Asian dishes to impart a sweet and sour note to food. It's a new product that the company, whom I do research and development for, recently introduced.

pastrychef_den
 

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Nice to see you back online Kimmie. :)


I started shopping for Indian and East Asian ingredients CC. I did make dal, loved it, and a chicken dish with 12 cardamom pods and 24 cloves in a yogourt sauce. It was very good and the cloves taste wasn't over powering.
 

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In Italy, we use to use tamarind (called tamarindo) syrup for sodas with a squeeze of lemon....very refreshing!! I have seen int in Asian Markets and aslo as a paste in block form at the Berkeley Bowl Market
chef:
 

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i have a block of tamarind paste that i have owned for a while but am just now gettig ready to figure out how to use (thanks to the inspiration of this duscussion!). does anyone know how long this keeps, opened and unopened?
 

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We have lots of tamarind trees in Barbados and as a kid I would climb them with my cousins to eat em raw. These are usually made into sweet & sour snacks for kids by combining the shelled Tamarinds with Brown Sugar and rolling it into balls. Hence the name Tamarind Balls.

You would have to use the fresh brown sugar found in the Asian markets that that awful stuff that comes in the domino box. Or as a jam or syrup. I cant wait to go back in August to get my fix of this stuff. Thanks for telling me that they taste like apricots. Ive never had an apricot and really miss my Tamarinds and dont know where to find them in this country.:( :cry:

I guess Ill use apricots.:)
 

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Rather than being a fruit, the tamarind is a legume with a large brown pod and many seeds surrounded by a pulpy mass. I do prefer Indian tamarind since it is less bitter.

Jbuder, this is for you:

Break the tamarind into 1/2 teaspoon pieces. Either cover with very hot water in a mixing bowl and let soften for several hours or overnight, or place in a glass bowl, cover with plastic wrap, poke a steam hole in its surface, and microwave on "low" or "defrost" until softened--about 10 minutes.

Mash the softened tamarind with your fingers to release the pulp. Turn it into a sieve set over a glass or stainless steel bowl, and push the pulp through the sieve with your fingers or a rubber spatula. The resulting thick paste is now ready to use.

Store the paste in a closed container, where it will keep for several weeks under refrigeration, or for several months in the freezer.

:p
 

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Where Iam from, Suriname South America my mom used to peel the tamarind and cook it in sugar. Since the fruit/pulp is quite sour in the raw state, after it has been cooked in the sugar it is a blast to eat afterward.
I remember the juice just streaming down my face...

MEMORIES....

Danielle
The syrup we mixed with water and ice for a cool drink in the hot Summer days:p
 

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:)
thanks all for your help. i also found another suggestion for softening the tamarind with hot water for a half hour. kimmie, thanks for the microwave version which will shorten this up considerably! it was a wonderful flavor enhancer in the vietnamese soup i made.
 
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