Chef Forum banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,648 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In another forum there was a discussion of about grain grinders. It seems to me that the protien percentage of flour is very important to the baking of bread. If I grind my own wheat berries, how do I know what the protien content is?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,528 Posts
Discuss assessing the protein content with a cereal chemist/lab technician. I don't think that domestic test kits are on the market presently.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,648 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I do not number any cereal chemist/lab technicians among my friends and aquaintences.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,528 Posts
Okay, Kyle, then contact any of the organic grain mills listed in the back of ARTISAN BAKING ACROSS AMERICA. Ask to speak with their lab technician or cereal chemist to explain the procedure to you. Having taken 4 years of college chemistry, I doubt that it's a procedure cheaply and easily executed let alone done in the home. :D

[ August 21, 2001: Message edited by: kokopuffs ]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,550 Posts
Kokopuffs,

You would be surprised to realize what this guy accomplishes in his easy/bake tiny kitchen...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,528 Posts
Also, Kyle, you'll probably end up with flour at nearly 100% extraction rate unless it's strained through bolts, that is cloth. Will your bolt match that used by a grain mill? Just a heads up. Extraction rate, however, affects protein content very little: plus/minus 0.4% is what the tech at RMFM told me. Yet, extraction rate directly affects ash (read mineral) content.

Next stop, ROCKET SCIENCE 101! :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
799 Posts
It's even simpler than all that--call the mill and ask them to fax you a spec sheet on whatever flour you are interested in. It will have everything on it. As far as grinding your own, I worked at a place where we milled our own whole wheat using hard red spring wheat called Bronze Chief from Montana. You never smelled anything so good as that that flour coming out of that mill. I disremember the name of the farm it came from but will think on it. For a really neat look, wrap up a batard not too tight, proof it upside down, then bake it right side up. We talking rustic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,648 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
TBH - Does THIS look familiar? I think I'll stick with ordering From King Arthur's :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,528 Posts
Kyle, the KA website lists local distributors where you can purchase a 50 lb sac of KA bread flour for around $11.00 (eleven dollars). That's about the going rate for 50lbs of most any flour.

In a place like NYC, I'm certain that you have access to distributors offering a wide variety of flours. As a matter of fact, why not discuss your needs with a local artisan baker who may be able to help you with flour procurement in bulk.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,550 Posts
KyleW,

Try Bouley's...tell them Martha sent you!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,648 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
They closed the Bakery storefront!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,550 Posts
Are you kidding? Are they still operating the restaurant?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,648 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Restaurant, oui - bakery, non.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
799 Posts
That's the place. Stuff cost 15.95 a 50 lb bag, so it's a little more expensive than flour, but there is no comparison even to King Arthur when you grind your own. Of course, we had a 16" Meadows Mills stone burr mill to do it for us. And all this you read about flour needing to be aged.. we got a lot of oven pop on the whole wheat bread, which supposedly flies in the face of conventional wisdom.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top