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I am hiring a new Head Chef and would like to have the final candidates show off their skills.

I run a golf course that is currently closed ... but I'm not a Chef so I don't know what ingredients I need to include within the box. We operate a busy golf course that includes a daily Bistro restaurant and also a Banquet hall that hosts 30+ Weddings per year.

I am thinking to include beef and/or chicken ... but unsure what cuts of meat. We have all the dry ingredients that would be needed, but hoping for some recommendations on everything else.

Any help is greatly appreciated!

Thanks!
 

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Anyone can cook a decent meal...what makes a good chef is his/her ability to show up on time, pay attention to the details, keep the kitchen clean, keep an eye on inventory, prevent spoilage and waste and theft, maintain a positive (even fun) attitude and prove to be reliable. Quality interviewing is far more helpful than amateur hour CHOPPED competitions IMHO. I could be wrong.
 

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Whole Beef tenderloin, filet being the trickiest cut of beef to cook to temp
Whole Chicken
I would not expect them to cook them whole, quite the contrary, single portions; but especially with weddings and catering, I would like to see breakdown, portioning, usage of product (and scraps) skills. Not to mention all the other things that would be revealed during this type of mystery basket interview, such as cleanliness, organization, ability to deal with pressure, time management, handling of a curveball, etc.
 

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I went through those processes 4 times so far (not for a head chef but for tournaments) 3 of them went like this:
I got told I need to make a certain number of courses (One was just the main, the other two where appetizer, main and dessert) I got a list saying these are the things I can use and per course I had 1-3 ingredients I must use. I have been given a time period where I had to send them my dishes and what I had to use then on the day of testing I got just these ingredients. Everything was looked at precisely, what waste I had, how I used scrap and the product itself. Thats maybe something you could consider.

The fourth one was basically I go in the fridge, choose my ingredients and cook.
 

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I agree with cheflayne.
Personally, I find mystery baskets a waste of time. They don't tell me anything about the candidate. Where did they work before? Can you call that place and ask? References, awards, recipes, tell me more than eating something he cooked from a basket.
 

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Also....
Aside from food, labor is going to be your biggest expense.

And a mystery box isn't going to show you anything about the applicants ability to effectively use his labor budget.

The crew can and will revolt these days under a chef who can cook but is a nightmare to work with. That can mean anything from a good food cost to one that is sky high but the food is inedible.

A chef is an executive in a lot of ways besides being creative. I've known a couple that were all thumbs in the kitchen but actually managed the place well...as well of tons of the reverse.

My last place was tough...but everyone had to produce quality. And on more than one occasion they would all screw up 1,2,3 cookie dough. But I'd catch it and fix it before it got used. I wasn't well liked but I was respected...and often that is enough.
 
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