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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
my artisan bread chef gave me tons of info to read on breads. its very interesting but it is stirring up tons of questions and maybe you guys can help

1- if a recipe calls for dry yeast and i was to use a pre ferment rather then the dry yeast, how do i determine how much of the pre ferment to use?

2- if a recipe calls for fresh yeast and i want to use a pre ferment, how do i decide on how much prefernt to use rather then fresh yeast?

3- if a recipe calls for dry yeast and i want to use fresh yeast, how do i determine how much fresh yeast to use?

thank everyone.
 

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When converting a recipe from dry to fresh yeast, remember to weigh twice as much fresh yeast as you would dry yeast and to do the same when you measure by tablespoons.
 

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I can help you with the third question.

One 1/4-ounce package dry yeast = 1 scant tablespoon dry yeast = One .6-ounce cake compressed, fresh yeast.
 

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Yeast Math
Courtesy of Nick Malgieri's Bread Classes @Peter Kump's New York Cooking School

1 Envelope dry yeast= 2 1/2 TSP by volume
1 Envelope dry yeast= 1/4 OZ by weight
1 Envelope dry yeast= 2/3 OZ compressed yeast in rising power

Therefore, 2 1/2 TSP or 1/4 OZ dry yeast = 2/3 OZ compressed yeast.

1 1/2 env. dry yeast = 1 OZ compressed yeast

Multiply envelopes of dry yeast by 2/3 to determine OZ of compressed yeast.

Multiply OZ of dry yeast by 8/3 to determine OZ of compressed yeast.

Use the inverse fraction to go from compressed to dry.

All referrences to dry yeast are to ACTIVE DRY yeast, not instant dry yeast.

[ July 28, 2001: Message edited by: KyleW ]
 

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Hi all,

Click here for more on fresh vs. dry yeasts

:cool:
 
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