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We don't get letter grades around here so this is new to me. Assuming that F is the lowest grade you can possibly get, how do you get an F and still be allowed to operate! I'd probably want to know what you had to do to fail - is it a high number of non-critical violations (unlikely I know). Are some critical violations more "serious" than others? Is it that the establishment didn't correct some critical violations? The average consumer isn't going to know the difference, but no one should be eating somewhere that gets an F ......
 

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In my professional life, not tolerant at all. Outside of work, I am much more tolerant of less than perfect. "F" is way outside of less than perfect though. I consider my self to be adventuresome and a risk taker, not sure I am all that adventuresome though. :~)
 

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I would first want to know what does grades mean.
As a sample, here we could only get a max of a 2 to 3 star rating (out of 5) for our lodge restaurant because we did not have aircon.
So, unless I know, fairly tolerant
 

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First off the restaurant is in San Diego CA. And depending upon the neighborhood I might not give it a second thought...but I might too. It depends on the food they serve and the volume the restaurant has.

I've been at the foodservice industry for a long time. I know more than the average person walking through the door about what is going on in the whole place...I can guess accurately the salaries of the people who work there and the quality of work they are doing.

The score by the health department in my experience, has been highly subjective and varies greatly from inspector to inspector.

The obvious violations of course most kitchens will do. Chemical and cross contaminations are usually not an issue. The one thing that slips through the notice of most places is usually the time of susceptible foods in the danger zone of above 40 but below 130. That time is cumulative and it escapes notice by most busy people. From waitstaff to cooks...no one usually adds the time up or does anything about food left out too long except put it away and pray its fine. Especially with the boss screaming about food cost every day.

Between the chemical sanitizers and etc most places are just fine.

But I don't eat out a lot to begin with. It's difficult for me to get excited about eating out because of my work history. I usually go out just to socialize with friends. Otherwise I just eat at work or home. But sometimes it is nice to have dinner with friends in their home or mine and have an even more relaxed time with preparing a good meal to share. Kids get to run around and go wild and sock feet are very much encouraged. And many hands make cleanup extremely easy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
i live in SD. Gotta know where this is? A very amazing Thai place i like to eat had a “B” out of the blue. Didnt phase me.
Hi Matt. It’s actually in my home kitchen, not a retail food establishment. I believe the card to be genuine but probably never issued. It was a Christmas gift, years ago, from a friend in that side of the industry.

In this thread I was using it as a convo starter, not intending to misrepresent it as a real-world situation. My apologies if that was misunderstood.

I read the Department of Health website listing of restaurant inspections for a hobby. In LA I’ve seen a few “C” grades and that’s where I draw the line and won’t even think about eating there. I did once…

“B” grades can happen from one major violation, mostly vermin or lack of hot water. Next most common violation seems to be holding temps followed by poor maintenance. Often a closure, 1-3 days happens too. I often chuckle to myself when I hear of restaurants that were closed by Department of Health announcing that the are closed for “kitchen renovations” when it’s really vermin. Can’t blame them for trying to save face, I suppose.

The grades, though, are historical, it seems, and what we see is what once was. Presumably the conditions have been corrected already. So I tend to be very tolerant of B-graded establishments because they probably have it all under control once again.
 

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Hi Matt. It’s actually in my home kitchen, not a retail food establishment. I believe the card to be genuine but probably never issued. It was a Christmas gift, years ago, from a friend in that side of the industry.
Thanks for clearing that up as it has been driving me crazy and that is short trip, believe me.
I knew there was a story behind the story or a punchline (à la Paul Harvey) because the grading scale is ABC. Phew!!!
Too funny! :LOL:
 

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Here we have "pass", "caution" and "fail" for the health department inspections and anything less than a pass is subject to corrective actions that must be completed within a specified time frame.
Would I eat at an establishment with less than a pass... well that depends. I'd have to look up online what the infractions were (public health makes the results available) and decide from there.
 
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