Chef Forum banner
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
2,717 Posts
If you have a nonstick skillet, you may find it easier to saute that way and then dump the results into the pot. Certainly it's less intimidating if you can really see what you're doing and control the heat directly.

Your questions:

1. Normally you heat the pan, add oil, then add ingredients. It's quicker, and if there is any trace liquid in the pan, the oil won't spit.

2. Lean out of the way. But seriously: a little spatter is normal. If it's a huge amount, there's something else going on.

3. Usually you're sauteeing to intensify flavor and to dry the ingredients a bit; sometimes, as with rice dishes, you're trying to get the rice evenly coated with the oil. How long depends on heat, ingredient, and everything else. Most ingredients can tolerate a little scorching, so don't worry. However... garlic is an exception, as it turns bitter very quickly. I suggest that there are very few cases where it will change anything if you haven't sauteed the garlic before braising (which is basically what the pots do). So I would suggest that you just don't put in the garlic until you're about to put in liquid and turn on the machine. Otherwise, saute until it smells nice, the colors get bright, and it doesn't look all wet and raw any more.

4. If there's brown stuff stuck to the bottom, then you want to loosen that up by deglazing. Otherwise it may burn. If the bottom of the pan is clean, there's no glaze to de-, if you see what I mean.

5. I don't understand the question. If you saute in the pot, how would you remove the oil? If you saute in a pan, which I think you'll find easier, then if there's excess fat, certainly try to pour it off, as it'll just make the dish fattier. But I feel like I'm not grasping quite what you're asking.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,717 Posts
On the second point: very often a dry pan isn't really as dry as you think. If you heat it with oil in the pan, the little bits of moisture will spit in the oil. If you heat the pan first and then add the oil, this won't happen. So it's a good habit to heat the pan, then add oil, then add ingredients.

As to the other point, sauteeing only needs maybe a tablespoon or so of oil, and often less. So once the ingredients are ready, there shouldn't be any extra oil hanging around to get rid of.

Does that help?
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top