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Well i just keep them in a bit of water and lemon juice. But apples is something if possible i do a la minute in the kitchen. 

"Lemon contains ascorbic acid, which not only lowers pH but can also reverse the oxidation reaction through a process chemists call reduction."
 

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I also drizzle them with lemon juice (small dice) or rub them with half a lemon (large pieces), then try to use as quickly as possible. 

If keeping for example half an apple overnight, I rub with lemon juice and place the half apple cut-side down on a plate. 
 

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Some apples oxidize quicker than others.  What I've found out the hard way is that "cooking" apples like Braeburns,  and Galas oxidize very slowly, while Grannys and red delicious oxidize very quickly.

I hate the lemon juice, it works, but I hate it, especially the bottled stuff.  I understand your need to keep diced apples on the mise en place, but I hate the idea of keeping them in water as well.

So, then what?

Well, logically, what about storing them in apple juice?  As long as they are submerged, no  air can enter and oxidize, right?  Apple juice tastes a heckuva lot better than water anyways.

Hope this helps.....
 

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Some species of apples possess a higher water content that will affect their rate of browning - if you've made apple tarts from different kinds of apples.  In the past I've mentioned a pastry book written by a master pastry chef from the Alsace Lorraine area and it is, indeed, a worthwhile read for you pastry and apple wannabees.
 

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I used  to keep my diced raw apples I grapefruit juice. Keeping them in Orange juice  also works but it changes the flavor of the apples .
 
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